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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: restraint

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  • Difference Between Judicial Activism And Judicial Restraint - 831 words
    Difference Between Judicial Activism And Judicial Restraint Our American judiciary branch of the federal government has contributed and molded our American beliefs in this great nation. This branch of government is respected because of the code of conduct that the judges, no matter how conservative or liberal. The language of the court as well as the uniform of the cloaks that judges wear has most probably contributed towards this widespread respect. Throughout the history of the United States, I noticed a pattern of "cause and effect" that our judiciary branch had practiced. I noticed that the judicial branch usually restrain themselves from involving in critical civil policy, but will be a ...
    Related: activism, judicial, judicial activism, judicial branch, judicial restraint, restraint
  • Societys Restraint To Social Reform - 1,785 words
    Societys Restraint to Social Reform Of the many chatted words in the social reform vocabulary of Canadians today, the term workfare seems to stimulate much debate and emotion. Along with the notions of self-sufficiency, employability enhancement, and work disincentives, it is the concept of workfare that causes the most tension between it's government and business supporters and it's anti-poverty and social justice critics. In actuality, workfare is a contraction of the concept of "working for welfare" which basically refers to the requirement that recipients perform unpaid work as a condition of receiving social assistance. Recent debates on the subject of welfare are far from unique. They ...
    Related: reform, restraint, social assistance, social contract, social justice, social policy, social reform
  • 1776 Vs 1789 - 1,691 words
    1776 vs 1789 The American and French Revolutions both occurred in the eighteenth century; subverting the existing government and opening the way for capitalism and constitutionalism. Because of these similarities, the two revolutions are often assumed to be essentially eastern and western versions of each other. However, the two are fundamentally different in their reason, their rise, progress, termination, and in the events that followed, even to the present. The American Revolution was not primarily fought for independence. Independence was an almost accidental by-product of the Americans attempt to rebel against and remove unfair taxes levied on them by British Parliament. Through propaga ...
    Related: working class, middle class, great britain, master, propaganda
  • 1968 Life - 1,242 words
    1968 Life Analysis of Life for 1968 The year 1968 was a time of war, civil rights movements, and riots. Many big events took place during 1968. Many lives were changed by these events. Out if the 1960s, 1968 stands out the most. In January of 1968 the United States thought that the Vietnam War was coming to a close, but President Johnson made a statement that changed the direction of Vietnam. President Johnson said the South Vietnamese could not win. This caused the South Vietnamese could not win. This caused the South Vietnamese to launch the Tet Offensive. This shocked the United States, and caused the war to linger on for several more years. The Tet Offensive spread from the cities of Mek ...
    Related: life magazine, thornton wilder, popular music, summer olympics, entertainment
  • 1994 Baseball Strike - 1,626 words
    ... 94, the owners declared the cancellation of the World Series for the first time since 1904 (Atlantic Unbound). In mid-October, President Bill Clinton announced the appointment of William J. Usery, Jr., to mediate the dispute. The President could not have chosen a more able representative. Usery was Secretary of Labor in the Ford administration and before that was director of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. Although 70 years old, Usery had remained active after his Government service by privately mediating some of the Nations biggest industrial disputes in recent years. He had the experience to identify common ground and the tenacity to move the parties in that direction, ...
    Related: baseball, strike, labor law, labor review, director
  • A Man With A Vision, With An Awareness Of The Good That Lives In People, With An Ability Of Dreaming Dreams Of Beauty For Tho - 631 words
    A man with a vision, with an awareness of the good that lives in people, with an ability of dreaming dreams of beauty for those he met along his way, this is John Bosco. St. John Bosco (1815-1888) was born to poor parents in Recchi, Italy, the Piedmont area of northern Italy. When John was two, his father died prematurely. As a boy, John lived on a farm with his family doing the only thing they knew how, farming. Poverty and a lack of formal education in the home did not stop the growth of John Bosco as a person. His mother was for real, realizing the importance of God in life. This friendship with God became powerful and slowly John prepared for the priesthood. In 1841 at the age of 26, Joh ...
    Related: awareness, dreaming, dreams, formal education, pope pius
  • A Place Worth Fighting For - 294 words
    A Place Worth Fighting For A Place Worth Fighting For Colin Chisholm's emotive plea for restraint in the development of the Squaw Valley ski area is particularly poignant and compelling. The power of the piece is found in his dramatic and impassioned scene setting. He cleverly intertwines the imagery of the valley with endearing anecdotes of the time he and his family spent there establishing a subconscious link between the two main focuses of the piece. By the time Chisholm begins to develop the conflict in the story, the relationship between the valley and his family has been established. He wants the reader to associate the fate of the forest with that of his mother and father. On page 79 ...
    Related: meadow, environmentalism, link
  • Anarchy - 1,645 words
    Anarchy Anarchism seems to be defined many ways by many different sources. Most dictionary definitions define anarchism as the absence of government. A leading modern dictionary, Webster's Third International Dictionary, defines anarchism briefly but accurately as, "a political theory opposed to all forms of government and governmental restraint and advocating voluntary cooperation and free association of individuals and groups in order to satisfy their needs." Other dictionaries describe anarchism with similar definitions. The Britannica-Webster dictionary defines the word anarchism as, "a political theory that holds all government authority to be unnecessary and undesirable and advocates a ...
    Related: anarchy, william godwin, working class, utopian society, empower
  • Antitrust Legislation - 1,392 words
    Anti-Trust Legislation As many people have noticed, recently there has been a huge focus in the media on Bill Gates, and his huge Microsoft Corporation. This past Friday, May 22, 1998, a federal judge combined two lawsuits and set a trial date for September 8, 1998. This trial date will address a government request for a preliminary injunction concerning Windows 98 as well as broader issues. The Sherman Anti-trust Act was passed in 1890. Then in 1914 the Clayton Act was passed to help with Anti-trust Cases. Anti-trust Lawsuits are few and far between, but recently cases against Microsoft are stacking up all around the world. In 1890 the Sherman Anti-trust Act was passed, but it was not until ...
    Related: antitrust, legislation, computer industry, public opinion, trial
  • Approaches To Environmental Ethics And Kants Principle - 1,026 words
    ... sent state of world hunger. First, the Commission claims there is a "moral obligation to overcome hunger, based on two universal values - respect for human dignity and social justice." (396) In the hierarchy of human needs, food is one of the most basic of all, along with air, water and shelter. If these fundamental requirements for life are not met, then higher level needs seem almost to be luxuries and unimportant. Unless all governments of the world actively strive to see that hunger is a tragedy of the past, "the principle that human life is sacred, which forms the very basis of human society, will gradually but relentlessly erode." (397) The Commission believes the US would be the s ...
    Related: approaches, environmental, environmental ethics, ethics, moral obligation
  • Areican And French Revolution Revised - 1,374 words
    ... largest country in Europe, France might never have recovered. Now contrast all of this with the American Revolution, more correctly called the War for Independence. The American Revolution was different because, as Irving Kristol has pointed out, it was a mild and relatively bloodless revolution. A war was fought to be sure, and soldiers died in that war. But . . . there was none of the butchery which we have come to accept as a natural concomitant of revolutionary warfare. . . . There was no 'revolutionary justice'; there was no reign of terror; there were no bloodthirsty proclamations by the Continental Congress." The American Revolution was essentially a conservative movement, fought ...
    Related: american revolution, french monarchy, french revolution, john adams, church and state
  • Avoidant Personality Disorder - 1,134 words
    Avoidant Personality Disorder From the moment a person is born, his or her personality begins to take shape. In infancy, childhood, and later adolescence, the individual explores a multitude of behaviors. Of all the behaviors, or personalities, the person experiences, one of them will stick with them until the day they die. Unfortunately, each specific personality also contain a personality disorder. Personality disorders can result in anxiety attacks, depression, and to a certain level, suicide. One of the most unique personality disorders is the Avoidant Personality Disorder. The DSM-IV (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) describes Avoidant Personality Disorder as: a persuasive patter ...
    Related: disorder, personality, personality disorder, self esteem, social situations
  • Baccio Della Porta - 1,766 words
    Baccio Della Porta Even the average person with little or no background in art may have heard the names Leonardo da Vinci, Michaelangelo, or Raphael. Not only because they are the most famous and noteworthy painters, sculptors, draughtsmen, designers, and inventors of the high renaissance, but also because of the countless stories and movies, fact and fiction which included these men and at least mentioned their importance, relevance, and influences on today'7s world. Many children have grown up already knowing these names, and perhaps that they were artists however simplistic that may be, after the explosion of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles in the late eighties. Perhaps there is one high ...
    Related: della, porta, high renaissance, body language, joining
  • Bird Imagery In Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man - 873 words
    Bird Imagery In Portrait Of The Artist As A Young Man Bird Imagery in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man The works of twentieth-century Irish writer James Joyce resound vividly with a unique humanity and genius. His novel, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, published in 1916, is a convincing journey through the inner mind and spirit of Stephen Dedalus. Portrayed with incredible fluency and realism, imagery guides the reader through the swift current of growth tangible in the juvenile hero. Above all heavy imagery in the novel is the recurring bird motif. Joyce uses birds to ultimately relate Stephen to the Daedelus myth of the hawklike man; however, these images also exemplify Ste ...
    Related: artist, bird, imagery, portrait, portrait of the artist as a young man
  • Booker T Washington - 1,451 words
    Booker T. Washington Booker T. Washington Booker Taliaferro Washington was the foremost black educators of the 19th and 20th centuries. He also had a major influence on southern race relations and was a dominant figure in black affairs from 1895 until his death in 1915. Booker T. Washington was born into slavery in 1858. As a slave Booker did not have a last name and chose Washington, his stepfather's name. After the Civil War Booker, his brother, and his mother moved to Malden, West Virginia were they went to live with his stepfather, whom they had only seen a few times. When they arrived in Walden, Washington was no more than 10 years old. However, he immediately went to work with his step ...
    Related: booker, booker t washington, booker t. washington, taliaferro washington, andrew carnegie
  • Boston Massacre - 1,870 words
    Boston Massacre In my report I will be discussing the Boston Massacre. I will be looking at the Boston Massacre from three different perspectives. These perspectives are the Boston colonists and Samuel Adams, Tom Hutchinson, Lieutenant Governor and Acting Governor in 1770, and Captain Preston and his troops. I will also hold some depositions from people who were actually close or at the massacre. I will be show the differences on how all three felt about the situation. Due to great burden from the different acts that brought many unwanted taxes from the British government, the minds of the Boston citizens were greatly irritated. Some individuals were so irritated that they were abusive in th ...
    Related: boston, boston massacre, massacre, different ways, commanding officer
  • Brave New World - 1,693 words
    Brave New World The novel Brave New World is like no other in fantasy and satire. It predicts a future overpowered by technology where the people have no religion. Has Huxley written about a degrading way of life or has he discovered the key to a perfect world that should be called Utopia? This essay will show that upon close analysis the way of life in the novel is justifiable and all the precautions that are taken are needed to preserve their lifestyle. This essay will also show that however different and easily looked upon, as horrible as their lives seem to be, in actuality it is better than ours. The first argument that would contradict the fact that Brave New World is a Utopia is the g ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, historical facts, helmholtz watson, possesses
  • Brave New World - 791 words
    Brave New World Sometimes very advanced societies overlook the necessities of the individual. In the book Brave New World, Aldous Huxley creates two distinct societies: the Savages and the Fordians. The Fordians are technologically sophisticated, unlike the Savages. However, it is obvious that, overall, the Savages have more practical abilities, have more, complicated, ideals, and are much more advanced emotionally, which all help the individual to grow. The Savage Reservation provides more opportunities for personal growth than does the Fordian society. Throughout the story, it is shown how the Fordian society is much more advanced technologically than the Savage Reservation. Because the Re ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, world aldous huxley, more practical, john the savage
  • Brave New World By Huxley - 476 words
    Brave New World By Huxley In Aldous Huxleys "Brave New World" the setting is set many years into the future. This future describes a world where science and technology have been allowed to progress unchecked. There are no moral or spiritual obligations and the good of society is placed above individuality and freedom. Lenina Crown is a perfect example of this society and all that it represents. Lenina Crown is a model example of how unchecked technology can destroy humanity. If you allow every desire to be satisfied with no work or effort it teaches people that they are entitled to privileges and should not have to work for them. With only physical wants considered the moral, emotional, and ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, huxley, science and technology, more important
  • Business And Technology - 1,828 words
    Business And Technology Agricultural Cooperatives and Grain Export Issues I. Introduction It is the contention of this paper that although one might be encouraged to locate a nexus of interrelationships between agricultural cooperatives in America and current, significant issues in grain exports. It is more likely however, that the crucial relationships involve a meta-organization of individual farms of various sizes, agricultural co-ops, various corporations related to agriculture, and United States government departments and organizations; all of which act and react to international grain export challenges. The effects of normal supply and demand fluctuations, new markets opening, and a my ...
    Related: american technology, technology, product quality, bibliography references, export
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