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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: baroque

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  • Baroque Art - 637 words
    Baroque Art During the Baroque period, new ideas and views of society and of religion spurred up. To express these new ideas many artists used the ideas of past artists to further expand their own motives. " If I have seen further (than you and Descartes), it is by standing upon the shoulders of Giants." Sir Isaac Newton, 1676 The artists of the baroque period were using past ideals as a ladder to the prevalent and the gallant. Four pieces of art that exceplified the usage of the great minds of the past were; The Rape of the Sabine Women by Nicholas Poussin, The east faade of the Louvre Palace, The View of Delft by Jan Vermeer and The Palace of Versailles. The magnificent artwork of Nicholas ...
    Related: baroque, baroque art, baroque period, king louis xiv, finance minister
  • Baroque Period - 1,490 words
    Baroque Period The Baroque Period The Baroque Art began in Italy between the sixteen hundreds and the seventeen hundreds. Classicism of the High Renaissance has been replenished during the Baroque period. During the Baroque period of art, the exploration of the fundamental components of the human nature and the realm of senses and emotions were very crucial. The Baroque era was very vast and dynamic, radiant and colorful, dramatic and intense, passionate and ardent, and sensual and overpowered by emotions. The superficial form of light was fascinated during this period due to the thoughts of godlike sun or the truth of the Holy Spirit. The Baroque naturalism maintains the religious themes in ...
    Related: baroque, baroque art, baroque period, human nature, breast feeding
  • Baroque Style - 658 words
    Baroque Style Baroque Style The Baroque style was a style in which the art and artists of the time focused upon details, and intricate designs. During this time the portraits began to portray modern life, and artists turned their backs on classical tradition. Buildings were more elaborate and ornately decorated. These works of art created history and altered the progress of Western Civilization. The progress has been an uneven one. Regression and progress often alternated, and shifts in direction often occurred. Art, architecture, literature, and historical events shaped the ideas of the era we know today. Architecture such as the palace of Versailles, and artists like Caravaggio, Rembrandt, ...
    Related: baroque, baroque period, francisco goya, divine intervention, transition
  • Difference Between Italian And French Baroque Architecture - 999 words
    Difference Between Italian And French Baroque Architecture Difference Between Italian And French Baroque Architecture Baroque is the name given to the art of the 17th century. But the baroque style, like all other styles in the history of art, began gradually. It started in the latter part of the 16th century and continued to be used well into the 18th century. Baroque can be defied as the florid, ornate style characterizing fine arts in Europe from the middle 16th to middle 18th centuries. The main characteristic of the baroque architecture is movement. Architects wanted their buildings to be exciting and to give the impression of activity. They did this by making dramatic contrasts of ligh ...
    Related: architecture, baroque, baroque period, italian, fine arts
  • On Baroque - 938 words
    On Baroque The Baroque is a style of art that embraces both formal and theatrical themes. It is a style that attempts to capture strong emotions from the viewer. Whether it is the striking contrast of light and dark, the strong diagonals used, or the story being told, Baroque has a way with the viewer where every emotion is heightened and pulled to the fullest. However, although the concept of Baroque pieces are generally similar, in Holland and Italy there are striking dissimilarities due to economical, political, and religious differences. In Holland during the seventeenth century, there was no monarchy or aristocracy. The middle class was started to become very prevalent and started to wa ...
    Related: baroque, baroque art, baroque period, roman catholic, real life
  • The Baroque Has Been Called A Theatrical Style, One That Deals In Spectacle, Grandeur, And Dramatic Contrast Test These Conce - 521 words
    The baroque has been called a theatrical style, one that deals in spectacle, grandeur, and dramatic contrast. Test these concepts in an essay that discusses the baroque as an expression of the Catholic Reformation, Protestant devotionalism, the Scientific Revolution, and the Age of Absolutism. Define your general statements with specific examples. The following essay will discuss the baroque period and how the Catholic Reformation, Protestant devotionalism, and the Scientific Revolution influenced it. The Baroque period generally refers to the years 1600 to1750. Classicism of the Renaissance has been replenished during the Baroque period. During the Baroque artistic period, the exploration o ...
    Related: baroque, baroque art, baroque period, contrast, theatrical
  • A Critique Of Two Concerts - 1,695 words
    A Critique Of Two Concerts Music is one of the most unique performing arts due to the way it has evolved. Styles and melodies considered unfit in one era are displayed prominently in another. The two concerts previewed in this report have two different and distinct techniques. The first performance that I attended was a symphonic concert playing a mix of contemporary and early 20th century works at Carnegie Hall. The second performance was an organ recital highlighted by the by the live performance of Bach's most well known pieces. Hopefully this term paper will objectively and subjectively critique and compare the two performances. An orchestra is a collection of a variety of instruments us ...
    Related: critique, baroque music, small group, renaissance music, horrific
  • A Dangerous Game Of Love - 1,307 words
    A Dangerous Game Of Love Would you like to play a game? This game involves passion, deceit, lies, and love. I viewed two movies that share the same painful theme; Cruel Intentions and Dangerous Liaisons. They both bring to life a set of characters that play with emotions like they are nothing but a mere child's game. I chose to introduce you to the infamous Viconte Valmont and the spoiled Sebastian Valmont. Not only are their names similar, but so were their motives. I liked Sebastian more because of his clench on reality. He portrayed a villain well, but at the same time proved that he too could have feelings. Viconte had feelings also, but it was much harder for him to reveal it. I felt a ...
    Related: dangerous game, true love, social issues, early baroque, reserve
  • A Reflection On Paul Hindemith - 1,231 words
    A Reflection On Paul Hindemith Paul Hindemith was revolutionary and a musical genius. Many people who lived around the same time saw him as nothing more than an untalented noisemaker. Granted, these people didnt have all of the various forms of music that we have today, but untalented would not be a word I would use to describe Paul Hindemith. He helped begin the last great change in classical music from the Romantic Era, which was very tonal and diatonic, to 20th Century Modern Music, which is extremely atonal. Diatonic means within in the key. In other words, everything sounds nice and pretty. There are no weird noises, no funny pitches. Atonal itself is defined as the avoidance of the tra ...
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  • April Robinson - 1,165 words
    ... uncil. On a few occasions Bach left to visit his son in Potsdam. Upon returning he would find the council quite upset with him, but would refuse to explain himself. He almost quit, but a close friend persuaded him not to. Bach got into some trouble while he was at Leipzig. He went on many out of town trips and left one of his students in charge each time. When the school board got upset and asked him about it he refused to justify himself. He would have been thrown out except for the help of a friend who had ties and had some strings pulled to keep Bach employed. After this friend left Bach quit. Bach composed many of his pieces for the specific groups that were to perform them. Thus he ...
    Related: robinson, oxford university, sebastian bach, university press, chorale
  • Art Imitating Life Imitating Art - 1,038 words
    Art Imitating Life Imitating Art The late 1950s saw a new movement in the art world this became known as "pop art" due to the fact that the artists in this movement with this movement manly Andy Warhol and Roy Lichensten of the unites states as well as David Hockney and Derek Boshier of Great Britain, used elements of popular culture as main sources of their work. A good example of this is Warhole's screen prints of Marilyn Manroe, where he took a famous icon of the time and used a mass production technique to make her into a work of art. Lichenstine looked at a different element of popular culture / youth culture- comic books. He used this style of painting and drawing to create a comic str ...
    Related: everyday life, andy warhol, great britain, hippie movement, branch
  • Austria - 1,042 words
    Austria Austria Austria is the republic in central Europe. It is about 360 miles long and has an area of about 32,378 square miles. Vienna is the countrys capital and largest city. Austria is predominantly a mountainous country, with an average elevation of about 3000 feet. Most of the land falls within the eastern part of the Alps. In general the major mountain ranges of Austria run in an eastern-western direction and are separated from one another by large valleys. The northernmost line of ranges includes the North Tirol Alps and the Salzburg Alps. Among the central range is the Hohe Tauern, which tops in the Grossglockner, the highest elevation in the country. The Pasterze Glacier, one of ...
    Related: austria, the awakening, southern germany, amadeus mozart, eastern
  • Baccio Della Porta - 1,766 words
    Baccio Della Porta Even the average person with little or no background in art may have heard the names Leonardo da Vinci, Michaelangelo, or Raphael. Not only because they are the most famous and noteworthy painters, sculptors, draughtsmen, designers, and inventors of the high renaissance, but also because of the countless stories and movies, fact and fiction which included these men and at least mentioned their importance, relevance, and influences on today'7s world. Many children have grown up already knowing these names, and perhaps that they were artists however simplistic that may be, after the explosion of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles in the late eighties. Perhaps there is one high ...
    Related: della, porta, high renaissance, body language, joining
  • Barqoue And Modern Flute In Composition - 1,436 words
    Barqoue And Modern Flute In Composition A comparative study of the use of the barqoue and modern flute in composition, with specific reference to - Sonata IV for flute and continuo by J.S Bach, and Sonata for flute and piano by Hindemith The baroque, or transverse flute is of great interest to me, mainly because of my own flute playing experience. Since listening to a concert which included both a modern orchestra and a baroque orchestra playing together in a specially written composition, and separately, I have considered the baroque flute a much softer and more beautiful instrument, in construction and sound. It is because of this interest that I have decided to carry out my investigation ...
    Related: composition, flute, female voice, comparative study, paragraph
  • Blues Music - 1,248 words
    ... the seventh, and sometimes the fifth scale-degrees were lowered a half step, producing a scale resembling the minor scale. (Machlis 578) There are many nuances of melody and rhythm in the blues that are difficult, if not impossible to write in conventional notation. (Salzman 18) But the blue notes are not really minor notes in a major context. In practice they may come almost anywhere. (Machlis 578) Before the field cry, with its bending of notes, it had not occurred to musicians to explore the area of the blue tonalities on their instruments. (Tanner 38) The early blues singers would sing these bent notes, microtonal shadings, or blue notes, and the early instrumentalists attempted to ...
    Related: blues, blues music, dance music, music, black experience
  • Caravaggio, Death Of St Matthew - 1,496 words
    Caravaggio, Death Of St. Matthew Caravaggio, Death of St. Matthew Michelangelo de Caravaggio is one of the most renowned and popular artists of the Baroque Period. In fact, many paintings from this period, as well as after have been described as Caravagesque. Caravaggios works are some of the most popular in Italy, as well as around the world, and have been put into there own stylistic group. In his painting, the Martyrdom of St. Matthew, there contains certain characteristics that make the painting easily recognizable to a connoisseur of fine paintings. This paper will discuss some background of this artists life, the content of the work, some ideas that it portrays and contains, and a visu ...
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  • Catherine The Great - 1,177 words
    Catherine The Great Throughout history, Russia has been viewed as a regressive cluster of barely civilized people on the verge of barbarism. In the eighteenth century, ideas of science and secularism grasped hold of Europe, and Russian Czars, realizing how behind Muscovite culture was, sought out this knowledge, attempting to imbed it into Russian society. Catherine II was one of these Czars. She listened to both the ideas of the philosophers and the problems of her people and strove to enlighten Russia by codifying the laws, establishing an elected government, funding hospitals, and forming a functioning school board. Her attempts, however, were met with only partial success. Her reforms re ...
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  • Citizen Kane - 1,168 words
    Citizen Kane The classic masterpiece, Citizen Kane (1941), is probably the world's most famous and highly rated film, with its many remarkable scenes, cinematic and narrative techniques and innovations. The director, star, and producer were all the same individual - Orson Welles (in his film debut at age 25), who collaborated with Herman J. Mankiewicz on the script and with Gregg Toland as cinematographer. Within the maze of its own aesthetic, Citizen Kane develops two interesting themes. The first concerns the debasement of the private personality of the public figure, and the second deals with the crushing weight of materialism. Taken together, these two themes comprise the bitter irony of ...
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  • Claudio Monteverdi: His Life And Contributions - 1,046 words
    Claudio Monteverdi: His Life And Contributions A comparison of two major Baroque composers: Claudio Monteverdi and Domenico Scarlatti The purpose of this paper is to analyze two psalms by Claudio Giovanni Antonio Monteverdi (1567-1643) and Giovanni Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757) and compare and contrast the two pieces to find out how music changed throughout the Baroque period. While historians grouped music of the Baroque period together based on certain characteristics, the music did not remain the same throughout the period, as it would not for any other musical time period. Composers from different points in the Baroque period were chosen, but the things the two composers had in common w ...
    Related: claudio, claudio monteverdi, compare and contrast, baroque period, contrast
  • Construction And Playing - 934 words
    Construction and Playing The main parts of the violin are the front, also called the belly, top, or soundboard, usually made of well-seasoned spruce; the back, usually made of well-seasoned maple; and the ribs, neck, fingerboard, pegbox, scroll, bridge, tailpiece, and f-holes, or soundholes (see illustration). The front, back, and ribs are joined together to form a hollow sound box. The sound box contains the sound post, a thin, dowel-like stick of wood wedged inside underneath the right side of the bridge and connecting the front and back of the violin; and the bass-bar, a long strip of wood glued to the inside of the front under the left side of the bridge. The sound post and bass-bar are ...
    Related: construction, king louis, johann sebastian bach, early music, ensemble
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