Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: religious practices

  • 43 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • Americas Culture - 471 words
    America's Culture America's Culture Adaptation and adoption from one culture to the next is prevalent within any culture and country. When examining the effects of this, finding its original root is key. Oftentimes a country will adapt an aspect of another culture, however it won't be preserved and practiced identically given only a few years to be fostered in its new civilization. America in itself is a prime example. During our germination we were known as the melting pot of every heritage - each immigrant internally packed his or her previously known culture. Although that was over two-hundred years ago, our country really hasn't changed much in relation to mixing a little of this and a l ...
    Related: american culture, americas, american history, religious practices, history
  • Archetyple Heros - 416 words
    Archetyple Heros In literature, the term archetype refers to a pattern or model of an action, a character type, or an image that recurs enough in life and literature to be considered universal. Medival heroes and modern ones share many characteristics; however, their approaches to dangers are quite different. First, the medival hero is thought to be brave. He goes out questing in search to set bad to good, rescue damsels in distress, and instore the chivalric code Might for Right. Next, the hero is often aided by the supernatural. He has the use of magical powers, wizardly weapons, and unearthly people. Sometimes in these stories, the supernatural being such as wizards, psychics, aurgers, an ...
    Related: famous women, james bond, religious practices, ordinary, rescue
  • Black Americans - 1,275 words
    Black Americans Black Americans are those persons in the United States who trace their ancestry to members of the Negroid race in Africa. They have at various times in United States history been referred to as African, coloured, Negro, Afro-American, and African-American, as well as black. The black population of the United States has grown from three-quarters of a million in 1790 to nearly 30 million in 1990. As a percentage of the total population, blacks declined from 19.3 in 1790 to 9.7 in 1930. A modest percentage increase has occurred since that time. Over the past 300 and more years in the United States, considerable racial mixture has taken place between persons of African descent an ...
    Related: african american, afro american, american revolution, black african, united states history
  • Chasidim And Old Order Amish: A Comparison - 1,765 words
    Chasidim And Old Order Amish: A Comparison Chasidim and Old Order Amish: A Comparison The two groups to be examined are the Chasidim and the Old Order Amish. We will begin with a brief look at the history of each group. The Chasidim, or Hasidim, as more commonly known, are a cult within the tradition of Judaism. The word Hasid derives from the Hebrew word for pious. Hasidism dates back to the early eighteenth century and originated in central and Eastern Europe. Its founder was a man named Israel ben Eliezer (c.1700-1760). He is otherwise known as the Baal Shem Tov. In Hebrew Baal Shem means, master of the [good] name. It is a title given to men who are endowed with mystical powers. Accordin ...
    Related: comparison, social control, eastern europe, mental retardation, psychological
  • Christianity In Ancient Rome - 979 words
    Christianity in Ancient Rome The way the Romans viewed Christianity is slightly different from the general theory. The Romans did not spend all their time hunting down Christians in order to crucify them or throw them to the lions. When Christianity first started in the Roman Empire, it was viewed as another sect of Judaism. There was no differentiating between the Jews and the Christians in the eyes of the Roman government. The Christians were seen simply as a more radical group of Jews. They were also not completely trusted because of their monotheistic belief and non-acceptance of the Roman gods. Not much was even known about them by the Romans because of their mostly secretive ways. This ...
    Related: ancient rome, christianity, rome, roman empire, general theory
  • Comparitive Philosophies And Religions - 1,983 words
    Comparitive Philosophies And Religions Life in ancient times was full of risks and uncertainty for those people living there. Much trust was put in the unknown, but as civilizations progressed, there was a feeling of need to understand the unknown and the meanings of life. Within this paper I will discuss three important issues that deal with the progress of life in relation to the civilizations of the Mesopotamians, Egyptians, Hebrews and Greeks. In ancient civilizations concepts of the afterlife were based on myth. Glamorous stories about gods and goddesses from the past were the motivation for ancient people to live their lives. In Mesopotamian culture, every day was controlled by the god ...
    Related: comparitive, greek religion, ancient civilizations, european history, codes
  • Confucius - 1,197 words
    ... i, that the people would correct their behavior by their own initiative. In the Analects, Confucius said, Lead the people with legal measures and regulate them by punishment, and they will avoid wrongdoing but will have no sense of honor and shame. Lead them with the power of virtuous example and regulate them by the rules of li, and they will have a sense of shame and will thus rectify themselves. (Analects 2.3) Confucius sought to create an environment in which people would naturally be harmonious and thus virtuous. He believed that harmony was an unavoidable result of li, because li was a perfect reflection of cosmic order. From a Confucian perspective, any land that acted according t ...
    Related: confucius, chinese society, social life, chinese civilization, buddhism
  • Cultural Relativism: Is Truth Defined By Our Culture Or Our Culture By Truth - 1,597 words
    Cultural Relativism: Is Truth Defined By Our Culture Or Our Culture By Truth? In his article "Cultural relativism and cultural values", Melville Herkovits defines the principle of cultural relativism as "judgements are based on experience, and experience is interpreted by each individual in terms of his own enculturation" (26). This is the basic premise of cultural relativism, that beliefs, values, and morals are all based on one's culture. Therefore, since morality is based on society and different societies have different views of right and wrong, there can be no moral absolutes. Since there are no absolutes, under this view of cultural relativism all moral views determined by one's cultur ...
    Related: african culture, american culture, cultural relativism, cultural values, western culture
  • Fossils Categorized As Archaic Homo Sapiens - 554 words
    Fossils Categorized As Archaic Homo Sapiens STUDY GUIDE 9 1.Describe general characteristics of fossils categorized as Archaic homo sapiens, their temporal and geographic range. Exclude Neandertals. Discuss some of the problems associated with the understanding of this fossil taxon. (a) Increased cranial capacity (b) Appear more similar to modern humans (c) Reduced face, less prognathic, greater frontal lobe (d) Thick cranial bones, no chin Archaic fossils have been found in Europe, Africa and Asia. Problems arise because there is very little fossil record and they are too young to date with pot/argon and too old to date with radiocarbon. 2.Over time neandertals have been considered both ext ...
    Related: archaic, fossils, homo, homo erectus, homo sapiens, sapiens
  • Hindu Caste System - 882 words
    Hindu Caste System At first appearance, the Hindu class structure and the social laws pertaining to religious rights based on one's class seem to be prejudicial, demeaning and exclusive to the point of abuse. The lowest Varna, the Shudra, is not even allowed to hear or study the Vedas based solely on their inescapable station in life as servants to the higher three classes. However, when one looks at their class system from a purely religious standpoint, you discover that the class system is not abusive in itself, and that the abuse that may take place comes from aspects of humanity outside their religious practices. Sanatanadharma breaks down society into four classes (Varnas), and the unto ...
    Related: caste, caste system, hindu, hindu caste, business people
  • In The Following Assignment, I Will Discuss The Issue Of Native Sovereignty In Canada, And Address The Question Can Native So - 1,257 words
    In the following assignment, I will discuss the issue of native sovereignty in Canada, and address the question; "Can native sovereignty coexist with Canadian sovereignty?" To answer this question I will summarize two articles that discuss the issue. The first by John A. Olthius and Roger Townshend entitled "The Case for Native Sovereignty", and the second, by Thomas Flanagan, entitled "Native Sovereignty: Does Anyone Really want an Aboriginal Archipelago?" I will be taking the position against the coexistence of native sovereignty with Canadian sovereignty. These two articles will help me support my position on the issue. Olthius and Townshend are in favour of native sovereignty within Cana ...
    Related: native, native people, sovereignty, aboriginal people, european nations
  • Indians And Tribe Gambling - 1,385 words
    Indians And Tribe Gambling Indian tribes existed as sovereign governments long before European settlers arrived in North America. Treaties signed with European nations and later the United States in exchange for land guaranteed the tribes continued recognition and treatment as sovereign nations. Historically, state governments have been hostile to the concept of recognizing and dealing with tribes as sovereign governments. The United States negotiated numerous treaties which they continuously violated in pursuit of the Indians' lands and assets, and ultimately to impose their will on Indian tribes and people as they seen fit. These actions by the United States reinforce the colonialism theor ...
    Related: american indians, gambling, indian affairs, indian children, indian gaming, indian reservations, indian territory
  • Jewish Societies - 446 words
    Jewish Societies Until the late 18th century, The Jewish societies all over the world were treated unfairly. Hatred and discrimination were used against because of their religious practices. Jews who live in predominately Christian or Muslim territories were forced to covert to the religion of that area. If Jews did not obey their, then they we either ordered to leave or they would be persecuted. Before the French Revolution, Jewish, culture and beliefs were not accepted in most European nations. Jews did not even have rights and were not treated equal. The French Revolution was one that had a great effect on Jews, because over a period of time Jews who resided in France were treated as equa ...
    Related: jewish, jewish life, jewish religion, french society, european nations
  • Joshua And The Shepherd - 1,303 words
    Joshua and the Shepherd Copyright 1990 by Joseph Girzone Published by Simon & Schuster Inc. The book Joshua and The Shepherd is a novel, in which the author creates a model for the Catholic Church. The author, Joseph Girzone, presents the reader with many changes that could be made to the Catholic Church. He writes on the possible impact of these changes and the attempts that certain Church members take to block them. In reading this book you will quickly ascertain that the author is very vivid in painting a picture in you minds eye of the incidence he is describing. In the first paragraph, of the book, he goes into a description of the beautiful day that the story starts on. Throughout the ...
    Related: joshua, shepherd, christian life, religious practices, jesus
  • Juvenile Delinquency And Religion - 1,338 words
    Juvenile Delinquency And Religion Over the years, countless efforts have been made to find a comprehensive explanation for delinquency. The results of these efforts have offered possible reasons as being both biological and social. It is still debatable as to what forces have the greatest influence on youth crime, but it is undoubted that several factors clearly make an impact. The direct relationships a child has with concrete social elements, like his family and friends, are likely to give some intimation of his involvement in crime. However, it must be noted that there are more abstract contexts for socialization that also exist as potential explanations for a childs behavior. The most pr ...
    Related: civil religion, delinquency, juvenile, juvenile delinquency, religion
  • Martin Luther Lived From 14831546 Luther Was Born On November 10, 1483 In Eisleben In The Province Of Saxony His Protestant V - 1,218 words
    Martin Luther lived from 1483-1546. Luther was born on November 10, 1483 in Eisleben in the province of Saxony. His protestant view of Christianity started what was called the Protestant Reformation in Germany. Luther's intentions were to reform the medieval Roman Catholic Church. But firm resistance from the church towards Luther's challenge made way to a permanent division in the structure of Western Christianity. Luther lived in Mansfield and was the son of a miner. He later went on to study at Eisenbach and Magdeburg. After studying at these institutions he moved on to study at the University of Erfurt. Luther started out studying law, but then went on to enter the religious life. He wen ...
    Related: luther, martin, martin luther, protestant, protestant reformation, province
  • Mexico - 378 words
    Mexico The Aztecs The Aztecs were the native American people who dominated northern Mxico at the time of the Spanish conquest led by Hernan Cortes in the early 16th century. According to their own legends, they originated from a place called Aztlan, somewhere in north or northwest Mexico. At that time the Aztecs (who referred to themselves as the Mexica or Tenochca) were a small, nomadic, Nahuatl-speaking aggregation of tribal peoples living on the margins of civilized Mesoamerica. In the 12th century they embarked on a period of wandering and in the 13th century settled in the central basin of Mxico. Continually dislodged by the small city-states that fought one another in shifting alliance ...
    Related: mexico, mexico city, hernan cortes, religious practices, amerindian
  • Mores Utopia - 927 words
    More's Utopia In Thomas More`s book Utopia, there is a great deal of irony in the way the people of this mystical place live and prosper. Much of what the people of today`s society assume to be universal truths of life are completely opposite from the Utopian perspective of the way things should be done. Some of these differences include the way they protect themselves from other nations, their economy, their system of land rights, and the nature of their relationships and marriages. In all of these areas Utopians differ greatly from the norm of western society. These differences serve as a commentary on the world which westerns take for granted. In the book Utopia, More uses irony to demons ...
    Related: thomas more, utopia, negative aspects, western world, strict
  • Native American Civilizations Thrived In The Western Hemisphere Before Europeans Discovered The New World These Civilizations - 411 words
    Native American civilizations thrived in the Western Hemisphere before Europeans discovered the "New World." These civilizations had many similarities and contributed much to the development of the Latin American culture today. Each civilization was a part from each other, however they had accomplished almost the something and had ideas that were alike but they were so far apart its a astounding of what they came up with. The environment is very important to a civilization. The Mayas lived in a tropical rain forest where they were surrounded by plant life and tree. The Incas however lived in a more dry, grassy, mountainous environment. But the Aztecs settled in a watery area, actually their ...
    Related: american, american culture, europeans, hemisphere, latin american, latin american culture, native
  • Religion: Confessions - 704 words
    Religion: Confessions confession "Forgive me Father, for I have sinned." This simple phrase from Roman Catholic dogma conjures up images of famous Hollywood confessions and dramatizations, but the real root of the phrase has a much more obscure past. Not only found in modern Catholicism, the confession of sin, along with the confession of faith, can be seen in religious practices throughout the world. The simplest definition Webster gave the confession of sin is "a written or oral statement acknowledging guilt, made by one who has been accused or charged with an offense" (Bookshelf). However, Webster also recognizes the less thought of definition of the confession of faith as "an avowal of b ...
    Related: first century, yom kippur, religious practices, confession, personality
  • 43 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3