Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: relevance

  • 194 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • Emersons Essay Selfreliance, Though Written In 1841, Still Hold Quite A Bit Of Relevance In Our World Conformity Is A Huge Pr - 550 words
    Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance", though written in 1841, still hold quite a bit of relevance in our world. Conformity is a huge problem in modern society. For unlike Levi's Jeans, the world has not been original for a long time. Some people are scared to be themselves, some people are unaware of conforming, and others are fully aware of their unoriginality and just don't care. Anyway you cut it, there are a lot of people who look exactly alike today. We are all different in some fashion, but many feel they are too original. They stick out. Right from the first stages of pre-elementary education to the latter stages of one's deteriorating life, those who are different are mocked, ridiculed an ...
    Related: conformity, relevance, postal service, secondary school, explosives
  • Examine Critically The Dramatic Structure And Relevance Of The Cassandra Scene In The Agamemnon - 1,240 words
    Examine Critically The Dramatic Structure And Relevance Of The Cassandra Scene In The Agamemnon Examine critically the dramatic structure and relevance of the Cassandra scene in the Agamemnon. BY SARAH SIKKES. Cassandra, was a daughter of Hecuba and King Priam, the rulers of Troy during the Trojan War according to Homer's Iliad. Cassandra was a beautiful young woman, blessed with the gift of prophecy by Apollo, who was infatuated with her. Unfortunately, she shunned Apollo at the last minute and he added a twist to her gift; Cassandra was doomed to tell the truth, but never to be believed. I promised consent to Apollo but broke my word... and ever since that fault I could persuade no one. [A ...
    Related: agamemnon, critically, dramatic structure, examine, relevance
  • History Of Unions And Their Relevance In Todays Society - 1,475 words
    History of Unions and Their Relevance in Today's Society $115 Designer Cosmetic Collection From Cosmetique -- Only $1! History of Unions and Their Relevance in Today's Society Following the lead of Britain from where many of the original settlers came, workers in various occupations banded together to form unions. Ship writers, boat builders, tailors, bakers and carpenters were among the first craft unions form in Australia before 1848. By forming an association workers could obtain better wages and working conditions. However the employers wanted the highest profit margins so wished to keep wages low and spend little money on the working environment. The law of supply and demand in the labo ...
    Related: history, relevance, union members, union membership, workers union
  • Physics Relevance - 321 words
    Physics Relevance By One aspect of physics in my life is gravity. Whenever I loose my balance, whether I'm on a bike, walking, or trying to stand on one leg, I will fall down. This is because every mass is attracted to every other mass, so my body is attracted to the earth, and the earth is attracted to my body, only not as much, because my body has a much smaller mass than the earth. This is also why when I drop something; it falls down, instead of just floating there like it would in space. This is very important in my life, because if I am not careful or if I start ignoring this aspect of physics I will fall, and end up with a bunch of bruises. This is also why when picking something up, ...
    Related: physics, relevance, wouldn, harder
  • Who Is Friedrich Nietzsche Can A Man Born In 1844 Really Tell Us Anything Of Relevance In The Twentyfirst Century To Simply S - 544 words
    Who is Friedrich Nietzsche? Can a man born in 1844 really tell us anything of relevance in the twenty-first century? To simply say Nietzsche was a German philosopher would be an injustice... let's stay clear of labels, I'll simply describe Nietzsche as a man with an incredible metal penetration of situations covering all walks of life... Friedrich Nietzsche challenged the foundations of traditional morality and Christianity. He believed in life, creativity, health, and the realities of the world we live in, rather than those situated in a world beyond. Central to Nietzsche's philosophy is the idea of life-affirmation, which involves an honest questioning of all doctrines which drain life's e ...
    Related: first century, friedrich, friedrich nietzsche, nietzsche, relevance, twenty-first century
  • William Blakes Relevance To The Modern World - 745 words
    William BlakeS Relevance To The Modern World William Blakes Relevance to the Modern World William Blake, who lived in the latter half of the eighteenth century and the early part of the nineteenth, was a profoundly stirring poet who was, in large part, responsible for bringing about the Romantic movement in poetry; was able to achieve remarkable results with the simplest means; and was one of several poets of the time who restored rich musicality to the language (Appelbaum v). His research and introspection into the human mind and soul has resulted in his being called the Columbus of the psyche, and because no language existed at the time to describe what he discovered on his voyages, he cre ...
    Related: modern world, relevance, western world, william blake, the narrator
  • 13 Were The Elizabethans More Bloodthirsty Or Tolerant Of - 1,288 words
    13. Were the Elizabethans more bloodthirsty or tolerant of violence on stage than we are? In addition to the visible bloodletting, there is endless discussion of past gory deeds. Offstage violence is even brought into view in the form of a severed head. It's almost as though such over-exposure is designed to make it ordinary. At the same time, consider the basic topic of the play, the usurpation of the crown of England and its consequences. These are dramatic events. They can support the highly charged atmosphere of bloody actions on stage as well as off. By witnessing Clarence's murder, which has been carefully set up, we develop a greater revulsion for its instigator. And even though we ar ...
    Related: term paper, children play, queen elizabeth, historic, victorious
  • A Streetcar Named Desire - 1,095 words
    A Streetcar Named Desire While it can be argued that all of the characters in Tennese Williams' play, A Streetcar Named Desire are living in an illusion, I do not think that all the characters are living an unreal existence, however some are, in particular Blanche, Stella and Stanley. Blanch, to some extent, is living in her own fantasy world plagued with delusions and outbursts. It is quite obvious that she is living an illusion. Stella is living an unreal existence in regards to the way in which she likes to pretend she is living in a happy home. Stanley is also, however to a much lesser extent, living an unreal existence. He is very self-centered and towards the end he seems to be living ...
    Related: named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire, upper class
  • Adjustment Disorder With Depressed Mood - 1,468 words
    Adjustment Disorder With Depressed Mood Running Head: ADJUSTMENT DISORDER WITH DEPRESSED MOOD CAUSE Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, Cause and Affect Abstract Research was conducted to investigate Adjustment Disorder with Depressed Mood, and some causes, affects, and treatment approaches. Not all individuals manifest or demonstrate the same depressive symptoms, which can make it difficult for clinicians to diagnose and treat. The American Psychiatric Association has categorized various depressive disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV, 1994). Researchers have investigated the validity of the DSM diagnostic criteria over the year ...
    Related: adjustment, depressed, disorder, mood, treating depression
  • Affirmative Action - 1,082 words
    Affirmative Action There are many issues in todays society that have two solid sides to them, sides, or positions, that cannot be proven absolutely wrong or right. Issues such as capital punishment, abortion, labor unions, animal rights and the list goes on and on. But one issue of this sort haunts our schools, our industries, and the subject, or core, of the issue has haunted our country for the last century. The subject of race, and the issue of affirmative action. In the case of affirmative action, like other controversial issues, each side is strongly supported and neither side can be proven right or proven wrong. The supporters claim it is the best way to ensure equal opportunity in the ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, equal opportunity, general public, hiring
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,375 words
    Air Traffic Strike The Pressures of PATCO: Strikes and Stress in the 1980s By Rebecca Pels -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- Note on electronic format: you can access any citation by clicking on the note number. In order to leave citations and return to the main text of the document, press the Back key on your viewer. -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- On August 3, 1981 almost 13,000 air traffic controllers went on strike after months of negotiations with the federal government. During the contract talks, Robert Poli, president of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Association (PATCO), explained the union's th ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, aviation safety
  • America Sports Construction Boom - 1,760 words
    ... have escape clauses that allow the team to move if attendance falls too low or if the facility is not in state-of-the-art condition. Other teams have provisions requiring them to pay tens of millions of dollars if they vacate a facility prior to lease expiration, but these provisions also come with qualifying covenants. Of course, all clubs legally must carry out the terms of their lease, but with or without these safeguard provisions, teams generally have not viewed their lease terms as binding. Rather, teams claim that breach of contract by the city or stadium authority releases them from their obligations. Almost always these provisions do not prevent a team from moving. Some leases g ...
    Related: america, boom, construction, professional sports, sports, sports facilities
  • American Beauty - 1,481 words
    American Beauty American Beauty tells the story of one man's search for happiness. The film introduces the audience to Lester Burnham, an ordinary- looking married man and father in his forties. Lester is in a loveless marriage. Lester's wife, Carolyn, is so wrapped-up in her real estate career that Lester often claims that Carolyn doesn't even acknowledge him. Furthermore, Lester's daughter, Jane, is completely distant, often claiming how pathetic she thinks her father is. Moreover, Lester has dedicated fourteen years to his occupation, and suddenly, he is in danger of losing his job due to downsizing. All of these factors dramatically effect Lester and culminate into feelings of desperatio ...
    Related: american, american beauty, the narrator, compare and contrast, plenty
  • Americans With Disabilities Act - 816 words
    Americans With Disabilities Act On July 26, 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act was signed into law intended to make the American society more accessible to people with disabilities. The general purpose of this legislation is to extend the prohibition against discrimination on the basis of race, sex, religion, and national origin to persons with disabilities. This further protects individuals with disabilities in recruitment, preemployment screening, hiring, promotions, layoffs and terminations, and any other term, condition, or privilege of employment. Private employers, state and local governments, employment agencies, and labor unions are covered in the act. In addition, the ADA app ...
    Related: american society, americans with disabilities act of 1990, public transportation, employee rights, hiring
  • An Analytical Essay Explaining Why Arthur Miller Wrote The Crucible - 740 words
    An Analytical Essay Explaining Why Arthur Miller Wrote The Crucible Authors often have underlying reasons for giving their stories certain themes or settings. Arthur Miller's masterpiece, The Crucible, is a work of art inspired by actual events as a response to political and moral issues. Set in Salem, Massachusetts in 1692, The Crucible proves to have its roots in events of the 1950's and 1960's, such as the activities of the House Un-American Committee and the "Red Scare." Though the play provides an accurate account of the Salem witch trials, its real achievement lies in the many important issues of Miller's time that it deals with. Throughout The Crucible, Miller is concerned with consci ...
    Related: analytical, arthur, arthur miller, crucible, explaining, miller, the crucible
  • Analysis Of The Right To Bear Arms, Warren E Burger - 938 words
    Analysis of "The Right to Bear Arms," (Warren E. Burger) The right to bear arms is a constitutional guarantee, and is not open for discussion; however the United States Government has used its power to limit and regulate this guarantee. Our government has been attacking this right for years, and like a covert terrorist organization, it denies its action. Pretending that they just want to limit the right to bear arms is their blanket of protection. They will slowly move from under that protection only when the nation is ready to accept the loss of this right and when it doesn't appear to be huge a movement to give up that right. At some point in the future, the right to bear arms will be so l ...
    Related: bear, bear arms, burger, chief justice warren, justice warren, right to bear arms, warren
  • Analysis Of The Underlying Social Psychology - 1,123 words
    Analysis of the underlying social psychology of the Holocaust March 9, 2000 The hate and prejudice that began the Holocaust went hand in hand with a political agenda that was fueled by the frustration aggression theory.(1) Hitler blamed the Jews for the loss of World War I and thus, instead of targeting political aspects of the Jewish community, he displaced his aggression towards ALL Jews, even the helpless. This, combined with religious anti-Semitism prejudice that had been present in Germany for 1500 years and the theory of eugenics, was the political and instrumental center of Hitler's political campaign.(5) He used a system of 'elimination of freedom', which he felt was necessary in the ...
    Related: psychology, social psychology, underlying, cognitive dissonance, jewish community
  • Anger: Sin Or Virtue - 986 words
    ... ded that an increase in rage occurs as "a sequence of provocations, each triggering an excitatory reaction that dissipates slowly (Goleman, 61)." I believe that this is an important area of study for this topic because we are ultimately trying to find that which makes us happy. This makes me also consider the idea of suppression to be an unwarranted. The approach to the problem that seems most reasonable to me is that of forgiveness. Once an "unjust" act has been committed the agent must review and assess the act. The main goal in this assessment is to come to an understanding or at least a conclusion that lacks anger. This is the ultimate end. As I see it anger is ever present. To attem ...
    Related: virtue, bantam books, nicomachean ethics, current situation, forgiveness
  • Aristotle B 384 D 322 Bc, Was A Greek Philosopher, Logician, - 1,556 words
    Aristotle (b. 384 - d. 322 BC), was a Greek philosopher, logician, and scientist. Along with his teacher Plato, Aristotle is generally regarded as one of the most influential ancient thinkers in a number of philosophical fields, including political theory. Aristotle was born in Stagira in northern Greece, and his father was a court physician to the king of Macedon. As a young man he studied in Plato's Academy in Athens. After Plato's death he left Athens to conduct philosophical and biological research in Asia Minor and Lesbos, and he was then invited by King Philip II of Macedon to tutor his young son, Alexander the Great. Soon after Alexander succeeded his father, consolidated the conquest ...
    Related: aristotle, classical greek, greek, greek philosopher, human beings
  • Attentional Capture - 1,886 words
    Attentional Capture ABSTRACT: How likely are subjects to notice something salient and potentially relevant that they do not expect? Recently, several new paradigms exploring this question have found that, quite often, unexpected objects fail to capture attention. This, phenomenon known as 'inattentional blindness' has been brought forth by Simon (2000) who raised the intriguing possibility that salient stimuli, including the appearance of new objects, might not always capture attention in the real world. For example, a driver may fail to notice another car when trying to turn. With regards to this, in the context of driver attention, this (draft) proposal predicts that intattentional blindne ...
    Related: capture, recent studies, real world, background information, partially
  • 194 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>