Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: recent studies

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  • A Magazine Is Not A Mirror Have You Ever Seen Anyone In A Magazine That Looked Even Vaguely Like You Looking Back Most Magazi - 691 words
    A magazine is not a mirror. Have you ever seen anyone in a magazine that looked even vaguely like you looking back? Most magazines are made to sell a fantasy of what we're supposed to be. They reflect what society deems to be a standard, however unattainable that standard is. That doesn't mean you should cancel your subscription. Women need to remember that it's just ink on the paper. Whatever standards you set for yourself: how much you weigh, how hard you work out, or how many times you make it to the gym should be your standards, not someone else's. Magazines portray unrealistic images and women need to learn to accept themselves. Women are now risking their health for the sake of beauty. ...
    Related: magazine, mirror, average american, modern society, dress
  • Adolescence Is A Time Of Storm And Strife - 1,781 words
    Adolescence Is A Time Of Storm And Strife : : Introduction : : Adolescence is a time of storm and strife. Adolescence is a period of time between childhood and adulthood. This is the age when one can either make something of his life or destroy it all, this is the time when a person makes those friends who changes the how he looks at life and how he faces it. An adolescent's main goal these days is to fit in and not be different from their peers. In this paper I will explore the probabilities of the following grievances experienced by the adolescent youth which are drugs, suicide, and homelessness. : : Body of the Essay : : Adolescence is the developmental stage between childhood and adultho ...
    Related: adolescence, storm, primary care, outdoor recreation, people's
  • Adult Illiteracy - 3,413 words
    Adult Illiteracy Learning to read is like learning to drive a car. You take lessons and learn the mechanics and the rules of the road. After a few weeks you have learned how to drive, how to stop, how to shift gears, how to park, and how to signal. You have also learned to stop at a red light and understand road signs. When you are ready, you take a road test, and if you pass, you can drive. Phonics-first works the same way. The child learns the mechanics of reading, and when he's through, he can read. Look and say works differently. The child is taught to read before he has learned the mechanics the sounds of the letters. It is like learning to drive by starting your car and driving ahead. ...
    Related: adult, adult literacy, illiteracy, attention deficit, young people
  • Advances In Medical Technology - 917 words
    Advances In Medical Technology Advances in medical technology have done a great deal to produce miraculous cures and recoveries. In some circumstances however, these advances have created problems for the elderly. More aggressive technology approaches are used to extend the life of the elderly. On the whole the elderly, as well as others, welcome that development -- even if they fear some of its consequences. With these advances it has become possible to keep people in a vegetative state for almost unlimited periods of time. Moreover, there are situations in which neither the patient nor the family has the ability to bring such unhappy circumstances to an end. For this reason, advance direct ...
    Related: medical care, medical practice, medical record, medical technology, medical treatment, technology, technology advances
  • Affirmative Action - 970 words
    Affirmative Action Few social policy issues have served as a better gauge of racial and ethnic divisions among the American people than affirmative action. Affirmative action is a term referring to laws and social policies intended to alleviate discrimination that limits opportunities for a variety of groups in various social institutions. Supporters and opponents of affirmative action are passionate about their beliefs, and attack the opposing viewpoints relentlessly. Advocates believe it overcomes discrimination, gives qualified minorities a chance to compete on equal footing with whites, and provides them with the same opportunities. Opponents charge that affirmative action places unskill ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, minority groups, men and women, roger
  • Aids - 1,140 words
    ... rom a few days to several weeks and is associated with fever, sweats, exhaustion, loss of appetite, nausea, headaches, soar throat, diarrhea, swollen glands, and a rash on the torso. Some of the symptoms of the acute illness may result from HIV-1 invasion of the central nervous system. In some cases the clinical findings have correlated with the presence of HIV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid. Symptoms disappear along with the rash and other sings of acute viral disease. When the blood test for HIV-1 antibodies become available, researchers demonstrated the lymphadenopathy was a frequent consequence of infection with the virus. Scientist do not know what causes the wasting syndrome, but som ...
    Related: aids, immune system, human immunodeficiency, recent studies, regulation
  • Alcoholosm - 1,165 words
    ... ven a small head size. Furthermore, FAS children may develop hearing problems, heart defects and physical and behavioural problems. Researchers have also found that some children who were exposed to alcohol during fetal development show only some of the characteristics of FAS, these children are diagnosed as having fetal alcohol effects (FAE). However, both FAS and FAE individuals may have some degree of brain damage (Brent, 1991). Clearly, in addition to physiological, social, and psychological factors which all play a role in contributing to alcoholism, recent studies reveal that there may be a genetic predisposition to alcoholism. More specifically, medical research indicates that alc ...
    Related: natural history, university press, york oxford university press, science, abnormal
  • Alternative Medicine - 1,013 words
    Alternative Medicine Alternative Medicine by Joe Grodjesk Sociology Of Medicine Professor Buban May 5, 2001 Alternative Medicine Throughout recorded history, people of various cultures have relied on what Western medical practitioners today call alternative medicine. The term alternative medicine covers a broad range of healing philosophies, approaches, and therapies. It generally describes those treatments and health care practices that are outside mainstream Western health care. People use these treatments and therapies in a variety of ways. Alternative therapies used alone are often referred to as alternative; when used in combination with other alternative therapies, or in addition to co ...
    Related: alternative medicine, chinese medicine, environmental medicine, herbal medicine, medicine, oriental medicine
  • Alzheimer's: Is There A Cure - 999 words
    Alzheimer'S: Is There A Cure? Alzheimer's: Is there a cure? In February of 2000, I lost my grandmother to Alzheimer's disease. She was diagnosed with the disease just less than two years prior to her death. Throughout that time, I watched changes in my grandmother that made her seem like an entirely different woman to me. She gradually began losing her short-term memory and we began to see signs of her long-term memory degrading too. It began to get harder and harder to take her out into public without being afraid of what would happen next. Her emotions would fluctuate with the changing of each minute it seemed. Physically she became weaker and weaker and would often scare us with falling w ...
    Related: cure, elderly people, food and drug administration, long-term memory, lowering
  • Alzheimers - 1,205 words
    Alzheimers Disease Alzheimers Disease is a progressive, degenerative disease that attacks the brain and results in impaired memory, thinking and behavior (Internet). It is a degenerative disease affecting nerve cells of the frontal and temporal lobes of the cerebrum of the brain. The disease is the major cause of presenile dementia (i.e., the loss of mental faculties not associated with advanced age) and is thought to be the largest single cause of senile dementia as well (Britannica, 306). It causes the connections between cells to become ineffective and the cells themselves to shutdown and eventually die (Davies, 1). Alzheimers is a progressive, irreversible, fatal neurologic disorder that ...
    Related: alois alzheimer, alzheimers disease, warning signs, mental illness, paranoia
  • Antibiotics - 1,650 words
    Antibiotics Antibiotics have played a major role in our society thanks to Sir Alexander Fleming's careful observations in 1928. Without it, many lives would be in danger due to infectious diseases. Antibiotics are chemical substances produced by various species of microorganisms and other living systems that are capable in small concentrations of inhibiting the growth of or killing bacteria and other microorganisms. These organisms can be bacteria, viruses, fungi, or animals called protozoa. A particular group of these agents is made up of drugs called antibiotics, from the Greek word anti ("against") and bios ("life"). Some antibiotics are produced from living organisms such as bacteria, fu ...
    Related: medical profession, half lives, printing office, concentration, permanent
  • Attentional Capture - 1,886 words
    Attentional Capture ABSTRACT: How likely are subjects to notice something salient and potentially relevant that they do not expect? Recently, several new paradigms exploring this question have found that, quite often, unexpected objects fail to capture attention. This, phenomenon known as 'inattentional blindness' has been brought forth by Simon (2000) who raised the intriguing possibility that salient stimuli, including the appearance of new objects, might not always capture attention in the real world. For example, a driver may fail to notice another car when trying to turn. With regards to this, in the context of driver attention, this (draft) proposal predicts that intattentional blindne ...
    Related: capture, recent studies, real world, background information, partially
  • Bowfishing - 1,158 words
    Bowfishing Not many people know about a sport called bowfishing. When people think of bowfishing, they think that you must lose a lot of arrows because the archer has no way of retrieving his or her arrow after launching it off its rest. This is a very big misconception in a very misunderstood and mysterious sport. As most people dont understand about bowfishing, then dont know that most bowfisherman rely on the darkness of night to cover them as the approach their prey. A specially rigged bowfishing boat with archer aboard the pvc platform, as the floodlights gaze onto the waters edge, the archer draws back his arrow and settles its sights on the unsuspecting Asian carp, the archer releases ...
    Related: recent studies, great land, life support, launching, aluminum
  • Bowlbys Deprivation - 1,480 words
    Bowlby's Deprivation In his hypothesis, Bowlby believed that an infants failure to attach to a primary caregiver would have long term effects. This essay will attempt to evaluate Bowlbys deprivation hypothesis. Firstly, the terms attachment and deprivation will be defined. Following that, a full definition of the hypothesis will be made, and then an attempt will be made to describe and understand the studies and period of history that lead to Bowlbys ideas and the influence they generated. A full evaluation will be made of his deprivation hypothesis, including detailed criticisms of his theory. Finally, conclusions will be drawn to show if Bowlbys deprivation hypothesis can still retain any ...
    Related: deprivation, world health, mental health, human behaviour, criticism
  • Cannabis Hemp Marijuana - 2,195 words
    ... lity is strong enough that we must try. Ultimately, the world has no other rational environmental choice but to give up fossil fuel. ENERGY SECURITY At this point, we can tell OPEC goodbye forever. The national balance of payments deficit is cast by the wayside and your personal energy bills can by cut by at least 50%, and perhaps as much as 90% with biomass from hemp and recycled waste. No more elderly or poor people freezing to death or living in misery in the winter. If introduced to Third World nations, hemp biomass could drastically cut our overseas aid and reasons for war, while raising the quality of life there by quantum leaps. The world's economy will/should boom as it never has ...
    Related: cannabis, hemp, marijuana, marijuana prohibition, u.s. government
  • Catcher In The Rye - 1,012 words
    Catcher In The Rye The Impossible Job: Catcher in the Rye Recent studies show that depression is common among teenagers. Although the research may be new, it is not a new disease that has occupied teenagers. In the novel Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, the main character Holden Caufield is a depressed young man searching for good in the world; scenes in this story push Holden over the edge until he has an epiphany that eventually causes him to have a breakdown. Holden's constant inquiry about the location of the ducks in Central Park and his conversation with Sunny, instead of sexual intercourse, signify a lost boy in desperate need of help. Holden interrogates two taxi cab drivers abou ...
    Related: catcher, catcher in the rye, mother nature, j. d. salinger, phoebe
  • Changing Job Roles - 3,019 words
    ... ust be able to motivate people to accomplish aggressive objectives within defined time constraints. Extensive travel within the European region as well as to the US is expected. European language skills, in particular German, will be a distinct advantage. Remuneration and Benefits Manager Coupled with being a good communicator, you will have excellent analytical skills, in addition to a demonstrable strategic perspective in relation to the development and implementation of policies. The models identified by Tyson and Fell have also be found in Irish organisations (Shivanath, 1986; Monks, 1992/3). Monks, from a study of 97 Irish organisations, identified four types of personnel practice: ...
    Related: business environment, current practices, poor management, developer, retaining
  • Childhood Depression - 758 words
    Childhood Depression Childhood Depression In recent years, we have heard of depression and the affects of the disorder, and what medications and theories help to prevent depression in adults. Many people are not aware that not only is depression diagnosed in adults, recently studies show that depression is diagnosed in adolescents. Not only adults become depressed. Children and teenagers also may have depression. Depression is defined as an illness when it persists. Childhood depression is one of the most overlooked disorders. Depression probably exists in about 5 percent of children in the general population. Children under stress, who experience loss, or who have, learning or conduct disor ...
    Related: major depression, single parent, panic attacks, verbal abuse, advise
  • Cocaine Abuse - 909 words
    Cocaine Abuse It is used in offices, parties, on street corners, in homes, and even in schools. With so much widespread abuse, cocaine is in extreme demand. Cocaine abuse has risen 118% since 1990, and continues to rise. Cocaine addiction is easy to understand-- it [cocaine] produces a good feeling, so naturally people would tend to want more of it. The question now though, is how does it produce these feelings, and why is the addiction so strong. By taking a look at cocaine from its entrance into the body, to the end of it's high, and the side effects it produces, the answers to these questions will become clear. When a user takes cocaine the user experiences pleasure beyond what a person u ...
    Related: abuse, cocaine, cocaine addiction, limbic system, side effects
  • Conflict Management - 1,290 words
    Conflict Management Organizational Behavior But we cannot avoid conflict, conflict with society, other individuals and with oneself. Conflicts may be sources of defeat, lost life and a limitation of our potentiality, but they may also lead to a greater depth of living and the birth of more far-reaching unites, which flourish in the tensions that engender them. -Karl Jaspers The amount of entropy in corporate America has increased substantially because of two basic reasons. The first involves the immigration of a large and continuous population of ethnic, migrant workers from different corners of the world. These knowledge workers are products of varying, and at times diametrically opposing e ...
    Related: conflict management, management, south vietnam, middle class, asia
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