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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: reasonable doubt

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  • 12 Angry Men - 345 words
    12 Angry Men As Thomas A. Kempis says, "Such as every man is inwardly so he judgeth outwardly."" In other words, how someone feels inside reflects his or her thoughts and opinions. This is true in the play Twelve Angry Men by Reginald Rose. In Twelve Angry Men, a boy is accused of murdering his father, and it is the job of the twelve members of the jury to decide his fate. Jurors eight and ten have strong feelings towards the boy that affect their votes. Juror eight is a calm, thoughtful man who fights to see that justice is carried out. Eight is the first to state that they should at least review the facts of the case before they send him off to die. He also points out holes in the old mans ...
    Related: angry, twelve angry, human life, reasonable doubt, mans
  • 12 Angry Men - 801 words
    12 Angry Men Every person may have his own way of defining the term "reasonable doubt." In the play "Twelve Angry Men", by Reginald Rose, one juror, number Eight, stands alone against 11 others to convince them that the boy is not guilty. He looks beyond the given testimonies in order to give the boy a fair trial, though this is more then the others think the boy deserves. If the jury finds a "reasonable doubt", it must declare an innocent verdict. A young man stands accused of fatally stabbing his father, and his fate now lies in the hands of his "peers:" 12 men from all walks of life, each with his own agenda, fears and personal demons. At first, based on their conversation, it seems that ...
    Related: angry, twelve angry, reasonable doubt, reginald rose, cars
  • 12 Angry Men - 885 words
    12 Angry Men Thank you Ladies and Gentlemen for all your time and service. I believe my client is innocent of these charges and you must keep in mind that if you have a reasonable doubt in your mind that this boy is innocent then u must vote not guilty and save his life. Keep in mind if you are doubtful and you vote"guilty" this boys life will be taken away from him and you will always wonder. Ladies and gentlemen how can you be so sure this kid is a killer? The eyewitness couldnt have seen the murderer perfectly. Think about it; she didnt have her glasses on and it was through the windows of a passing El-train. How could she have been so sure it was the boy under those conditions? She could ...
    Related: angry, reasonable doubt, make sense, late night, smart
  • 12 Angry Men - 830 words
    12 Angry Men Many movies start with promising premises that end up only partially fulfilled, but 12 ANGRY MEN never disappoints. The rich drama with minimalist sets occurs almost completely within the confines of a jury room. The incredibly strong ensemble cast for the jury includes: Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb, Ed Begley, E.G. Marshall, Jack Warden, Jack Klugman, Edward Binns, Joseph Sweeney, Martin Balsam, George Voskovec, John Fiedler and Robert Webber. To further minimize distractions, we never learn most of the jurors' names. We know them by their opinions, backgrounds and weaknesses. They have their juror numbers, and that is considered sufficient labeling. As the story opens, a bored jud ...
    Related: angry, reasonable doubt, capital murder, academy award, banker
  • 12 Angry Men - 861 words
    12 Angry Men Twelve Angry Men Leaders are defined by two separate characteristics; those who are appointed as the leader and those with no special title that emerge as influential. In the movie Twelve Angry Men, Henry Fonda portrays a character that gains respect by others for emerging as a leader. Along with holding leadership abilities, his actions also resulted in classic communication techniques. At the beginning of the movie, it may seem that Fonda is displaying deviant behavior. The scene opens with the jurors casting guilty votes to determine a thoughtless verdict. All eleven jurors, except one (Fonda) voted guilty. As a viewer watching this movie, you have to give the character consi ...
    Related: angry, twelve angry, leadership style, deviant behavior, tension
  • 12 Angry Men - 419 words
    12 Angry Men Every man put on trial is considered innocent until proven guilty. In 12 Angry Men this theory can almost be considered false to the jurors involved in this murder case. But one man can be credited with sticking to the innocent until proven guilty theory that most likely saved a man's life. This juror must show 11 other jurors that he can prove with enough valid evidence that this boy is be wrongfully accused of killing his father. Reginald Rose shows us how that one mans integrity can prove to make a big difference in a kid's life. Juror #8 can be credited with saving someone's life. Under intense and hostile scrutiny juror #8 is the only juror to vote not guilty on the stabbin ...
    Related: angry, the courtroom, reginald rose, reasonable doubt, integrity
  • 12 Angry Men - 485 words
    12 Angry Men A persons surroundings can influence him. In 12 Angry Men by Reginald Rose a young mans life is held by twelve men with contrasting views. After hearing, the case the jurors go into deliberations. Eleven of the 12 are convinced that the boy murdered his father. However, Juror # 8 a caring man, who wishes to talk about why the other jurors think that the boy is guilty, clashes with Juror # 3, a sadistic man who would pull the switch himself to end the boys life. Early on, it's not revealed why #3 feels so strongly about putting the boy to death. He is just so dead set on killing him though. But because of Juror # 8, the others must now go over the whole case again to review the f ...
    Related: angry, reasonable doubt, reginald rose, contrasting views, sadistic
  • Accomplice Liabilty - 2,666 words
    Accomplice Liabilty Questions Presented 1. Whether a person in Alaska can be charged as an accomplice to an unintentional crime, when Alaskan courts required that one must have the specific intent to promote or facilitate the offense? 2. Whether the mother was the legal cause of her children's death, when she permitted the father to take the children in his car when he was drunk? Statement of the Case The appellant, Elaine Benis, was indicted in the County of Norchester, on one count of manslaughter, pursuant to A.S. 11.41.120. (R. at 1.) She was also indicted for one count of accessory to manslaughter, pursuant to A.S. 11.41.120 and A.S. 11.16.110. (R. at 1). After the presentation of the p ...
    Related: oxford dictionary, drunk driving, supreme court, traffic, commission
  • An American Tragedy - 1,103 words
    An American Tragedy An American Tragedy Where were you November 22, 1963? Any and every American old enough to mourn, to feel sorrow, remembers where they were and what they were doing when they received the news that President John F. Kennedy had been murdered. The event had an effect on the entire nation. Men and women, Democrats and Republicans, adults and children mourned the loss of their fallen leader. President Johnson, the Warren Commission, and every fascinated watcher-on in the world would closely scrutinize that day and the following events. The facts of the day are still hotly contested. Politicians have made their careers on the case. Conspiracy theorists have had a field day wr ...
    Related: american, american government, american people, tragedy, texas governor
  • Capital Puinishment - 1,606 words
    Capital Puinishment Capital Punishment is an Unlawful and Ineffective Deterrent to Murder The United States is one of the few countries left in the world to practice the savage and immoral punishment of death. Retentionists argue that the consequence of death prevents people from committing the crime of murder. It is proven that the death penalty does not deter persons from committing murder, nor does it serve as an example of the consequences of capital crimes to society. Furthermore, it is impossible to guarantee that the criminal justice system will not discriminate against or execute the innocent. Above all, the methods of execution are horrifying and barbaric, as well as the devaluing o ...
    Related: capital punishment, supreme court, national coalition, criminal behavior, coalition
  • Capitol Punishment - 1,811 words
    Capitol Punishment Capital Punishment The Argument Against the Death Penalty The feeling of the condemned man was indescribable, as he was minutes away from being executed by an unjust decision. The verdict of his case was guilty on the grounds of circumstantial evidence. When in all reality, he was guilty because he was black, poor and socially unacceptable. His case never stood a chance, it was over before it started. The judge and jury sentence the man to die in the electric chair. The condemned man sat in the chair sweating profusely, waiting for a someone to wake him from this nightmare. A certain death awaited this young mans future. He could not believe that a country like ours upheld ...
    Related: capital punishment, capitol, capitol punishment, punishment, eighth amendment
  • Death Penalty - 4,935 words
    ... Whenever the word death penalty comes up, extremists from both sides start yelling out their arguments. One side says deterrence, the other side says there's a potential of executing an innocent man; one says justice, retribution, and punishment; the other side says execution is murder. However, all the arguments aside, the best way and the only way to truly make a rational. Decision about capital punishment is to examine the purpose of our criminal justice system. Once the purpose of the criminal justice system is established, one must find out the purpose of capital punishment. This paper will show that the purpose of capital punishment is consistent with and embodies the purpose of t ...
    Related: death penalty, death row, death sentence, penalty, penal system
  • Euthanasia In The United States - 1,840 words
    Euthanasia In The United States Euthanasia in the United States Every year two million people die in North America. Chronic illness, such as cancer or heart disease, accounts for two of every three deaths. It is estimated that approximately seventy percent of these people die after a decision is made to forgo life-sustaining treatment (Choice in Dying). In America and all around the world, the ongoing debate is whether patients should have the opportunity to implement this critical alternative of euthanasia. Although controversial, it is imperative that United States citizens are not denied this right to a humane death. Groups in opposition to euthanasia say that patients who yearn to make t ...
    Related: euthanasia, united states citizens, reasonable doubt, human factor, liberty
  • Great Expectations And Sincere Feelings - 1,509 words
    Great Expectations And Sincere Feelings Websters dictionary defines love in many different ways, "A feeling of intense desire and attraction toward a person with whom one is disposed to make a pair; the emotion of sex and romance. To have a feeling of intense desire and attraction toward (a person) (Webster, love)". In Great Expectations, Pip is going through maturity, and is always undergoing maturity. We find that Pip is always longing for friends, family, and for love. Love can be a number of things to different people. Love is an emotion, where there is no wrong definition, for it suits each and every person differently, however some characteristics are the same amongst everybody. Pip th ...
    Related: great expectations, good thing, merriam webster, miss havisham, loving
  • Hate Crimes - 1,181 words
    Hate Crimes Homosexual people make up ten percent of the population; that means if you are sitting in a classroom of thirty, then more than likely three of those people are gay. However, this overwhelmingly large minority group continues to be one of the least protected by the government as well as most heavily targeted by discrimination and hate crimes. Regardless of the powerful shift in public opinion on homosexuality during the last twenty years and the outcry for more government intervention in the case of hate crimes and other such atrocities, the laws have remained invariable. A hate crime is an act of aggression against an individual's actual or perceived race, ethnicity, religions, ...
    Related: crime statistics, hate crime, hate crimes, public opinion, freedom of speech
  • In The Novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, By Harper Lee, The Author Comments On - 327 words
    In the novel, To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, the author comments on life. Specifically, Harper Lee comments on racism and true courage. Racism is the first subject that the author comments on. It is obvious from her writing that she feels racism is that it is wrong. This is displayed in several ways. The best example of racism is the trial of Tom Robinson. Tom received a guilty verdict even though he was innocent. The white jury convicted him for the sole reason that he is black. Another example of racism is that fact the black children were not educated. Only the white children of Maycomb were granted the right to go to school. Another example of racism is the way people acted at Cal ...
    Related: harper, harper lee, to kill a mockingbird, atticus finch, reasonable doubt
  • International Military Tribunal For The Far East - 1,075 words
    International Military Tribunal For The Far East The International Military Tribunal for the Far East Before assembling here today the Members of the Tribunal signed a joint affirmation to administer justice according to law, without fear, favor or affection. We fully appreciate the great responsibility resting upon us. There has been no more important criminal trial in all history. Certainly we are not a Senate or a House of Peers met for the impeachment of a Verrus or a Hastings, but a court of our respective countries. On the other hand the accused before us were no mere provincial governors, but for more than a decade were the leaders of Japan at the height of her power and prosperity. T ...
    Related: international law, tribunal, new zealand, more important, seemingly
  • Jfk Assassination Witnesses In The Motorcade - 1,298 words
    ... second and third shots right after the other (WC IV 146). Mr. Connally doesnt recall the second shot but heard the first and third. He described them as being rifle shots (WC IV 129). Due to the rapidity of the shots, his first impression at the scene was that there were either multiple gunmen or a lone gunman with an automatic rifle (Conspiracy 19). Agent Sorrels also believes that the second and third shots were fired very close together (WC VII 332). At least closer than the first and second shots. Several other witnesses in the motorcade also believed that the last two shots came almost one on top of the other. According to the Warren Report, it was the third shot that hit President ...
    Related: assassination, witnesses, american public, true story, visiting
  • Journey Through My Mind - 1,151 words
    Journey Through My Mind Human beings are very inquisitive creatures by nature. Since the dawn of mankind, the basis for existence has been relentlessly sought. Everyone has differing views and everyone is right according to him or herself. So, what does that mean? Why do people believe the things they do? My Agnostic religion is a very large part of who I am, and that is why I have decided to focus my paper on this aspect of my life. Unlike the majority of the people on this earth (estimated at somewhere around 95% I believe), I do not necessarily believe in God or a higher creature. I was not raised to worship an invisible, omnipotent being and I believe this is the main reason I think the ...
    Related: reasonable doubt, belief system, people believe, history, label
  • Justice Whites Interpretation Of Tennessee State Law - 976 words
    Justice WhiteS Interpretation Of Tennessee State Law CONCURRING OPINION: We concur with Justice White's interpretation of Tennessee State law. However, we propose that more restrictive standards should be used by policemen when dealing with imminently dangerous circumstances. The necessity standard that White proposes for governing the use of lethal force strikes the right balance in regulating violence. He insists that the police act reasonably by evaluating whether the felon's interest in life outweighs the state's interest in seizing the felon by lethal force. Because we honor the supreme value of human life, lethal force should only be used when there is a reasonable belief that the felo ...
    Related: interpretation, tennessee, self defense, benefit analysis, unreasonable
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