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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: bantam books

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  • Abnormal Psychology - 1,142 words
    ... buting cause or consequence of beingantisocial. People that are both antisocial and alcoholic are prone toviolent behavior. Not every antisocial becomes a criminal. An antisocialpersons disorder peaks between the ages of 24 and 44 and drops offsharply after that. After the age of 30 the sociopath fights less andperforms less crime but the illness can persist into the ages of between 60and 70 but after 30 are less likely to be in trouble with the law. In asociopaths in their thirties will continue to have problems such as unstablerelationships, substance abuse, impulsiveness, poor temper control andfailure to honor financial obligations. In our population 3% men haveAnti-Social Personalit ...
    Related: abnormal, abnormal psychology, psychology, antisocial personality disorder, anti-social personality disorder
  • Alaskan Aviation - 1,481 words
    ... made a timed distance run with a stopwatch and compass, and dropped bombs on an unseen target. This became known as dead reckoning bombing or "DR" runs. Eareckson also began using time-delayed fuses on his bombs that prevented the bombs from exploding under the low flying aircraft that had just dropped its ordnance (Garfield 106). His experiences in Alaska were to contribute significantly to the air war in the Pacific. Having flown in the worst weather imaginable, Col. Eareckson was more than capable of handling a few enemy fighters. Another unique aspect of the war in Alaska was the Lend -Lease program. The Lend- Lease program was established to send supplies and equipment to the embat ...
    Related: alaskan, aviation, international airport, ozone layer, elmer
  • Analysis Of Huckleberry Finn, The Red Badge Of Courage, And The Catcher And The Rye - 1,559 words
    Analysis Of Huckleberry Finn, The Red Badge Of Courage, And The Catcher And The Rye Teenagers everywhere have experienced an emotional bond with the characters Huckleberry Fin, Henry Fleming, and Holden Caulfield while reading The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Red Badge of Courage, and The Catcher in the Rye. Hucks adventure down the Mississippi, Henrys challenging experience in the Civil War, and Holdens weekend of self examination in New York City present various views of the transition of the adolescent into adulthood. All three characters evolve from nave, innocent children to adult men, sharing their experiences, personal interactions, and emotions thus relating to the readers own ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, badge, catcher, catcher in the rye, huckleberry, huckleberry finn, red badge of courage
  • Anger: Sin Or Virtue - 986 words
    ... ded that an increase in rage occurs as "a sequence of provocations, each triggering an excitatory reaction that dissipates slowly (Goleman, 61)." I believe that this is an important area of study for this topic because we are ultimately trying to find that which makes us happy. This makes me also consider the idea of suppression to be an unwarranted. The approach to the problem that seems most reasonable to me is that of forgiveness. Once an "unjust" act has been committed the agent must review and assess the act. The main goal in this assessment is to come to an understanding or at least a conclusion that lacks anger. This is the ultimate end. As I see it anger is ever present. To attem ...
    Related: virtue, bantam books, nicomachean ethics, current situation, forgiveness
  • Black Holes: Infinity And Beyond - 1,439 words
    Black Holes: Infinity and Beyond If theories of their existence are true, black holes are the most powerful force in the known physical universe. Many people are familiar with the term black hole, but few people actually know anything about them. A black hole forms as a result of a massive star running out of fuel to burn (Chaisson, 193). Once the star is no longer exerting outward force by burning off gases, it begins to collapse under its own intense, inward gravity (Chaisson, 193). It is like slowly letting the air out of a balloon. Once the star is compacted to a certain size, while its mass, or weight, remains the same, its gravity becomes so powerful that nothing can escape it (Hawking ...
    Related: black hole, black holes, infinity, human life, theoretical physics
  • Charles Manson - 1,319 words
    ... girls to care for the man so that the "Family" could might stay there as long as they wished. Mr. Spahn soon grew desperately afraid of Manson and only allowed him to stay because he enjoyed the attention he got from the girls who cooked and cleaned for him. It was at this ranch that Manson seriously started developing his cult. Mansons following grew and many more people were recruited in the "Family." He started preaching to his followers in bizarre ways. He would have the group take acid trips then listen to him as he spun twisted stories that put ideas into their heads. Charles would reenact the Crucifixion of Christ, trying to instill upon his followers minds that he was Jesus Chri ...
    Related: charles manson, manson, jesus christ, bantam books, penalty
  • Charles Manson: Methods To The Madness - 1,869 words
    Charles Manson: Methods To The Madness On the morning of August 9, 1969, three LAPD officers arrived at 10050 Cielo Drive (Bugliosi 7). The scene that awaited them was horrendous. In the driveway, in a parked car, the body of Steven Parent was found. He was shot four times and stabbed once. Laying about eighteen or twenty feet past the front door of the house, Voytek Frykowski had been shot twice, beaten over the head with a blunt object thirteen times, and stabbed fifty-one times. Also discovered on the lawn was coffee heiress Abigail Folger, stabbed twenty-eight times. Inside the home, in the living room, were the bodies of Jay Sebring and Sharon Tate. Sebring, a hair stylist, had been sta ...
    Related: charles manson, madness, saint joseph, highest level, eager
  • Christian Antisemitism - 1,287 words
    ... hern France; he wrote that Jews are "more perfidious and faithless than demons." (20) Persecution of Jews continued right into the Reformation and became more vicious. Identification of Jews with Satan became increasingly explicit. Erasmus (1466-1536), the Dutch philosopher and theologian, wrote, "If it is the part of a good Christian to detest the Jews, then we are all good Christians." (21) Lest one should place all this anti-Semitism at the door of the Catholic Church, no less a Protestant hero than Martin Luther denounced Jews as children of the devil. In 1542 Luther published Against the Jews and Their Lies, a 200-page rant which includes the following: Know, O adored Christ, and ma ...
    Related: antisemitism, christian, christian faith, chicago press, black people
  • Cults Each Year, Hundreds Of North Americans Join One Of The Increasing, Estimated 3000 Unorthodox Religions That Exist Acros - 1,057 words
    ... ill sing for some thirty minutes.5 This tranquil, peaceful setting, purposely contrasts with that of the world outside of the compound. In order for a cult member to be adequately convinced of a cults merits they must see how much more pleasant life will be inside the compound. Cults, like the Hare Krishna, remind members how chaotic the outside world is, and maintain impeccable order inside their compounds to maintain purity. The details of life are closely regulated by the Spiritual Master. He insists that each devotee take two showers daily, and take a cup of warm milk before retiring; these customs are scrupulously followed. Devotees live an idyllic rural, communal, devotional, and v ...
    Related: social status, book company, men and women, porter, poison
  • Damsels In Address - 1,335 words
    Damsels In Address It is clearly evident that many fairy tales of childhood tend to shape the reader. Certain moral codes and ideals are tightly woven into the text of many fairy tales, promoting or denoting a characters actions. In the Grimms fairy tales Cinderella, Brier Rose, and Rapunzel, the heroines of these tales exhibit strong behavioral codes, thus providing opportunity for the young female reader to relate to the damsel, or to model herself to behave in a similar fashion. In accordance with Marcia R. Liebermans essay, " Some Day My Prince Will Come: Female Acculturation Through the Fairy Tale," I agree with the assertion that positive traits in fairy tale indicate reward, while the ...
    Related: damsel in distress, young people, fairy tale, fairy godmother, lesser
  • Destructive Generation: Second Thoughts The 60s: Years Of Hope Comparison - 762 words
    Destructive Generation: Second Thoughts & The 60s: Years of Hope - Comparison The preface to Peter Collier and David Horowitz's Destructive Generation: Second Thoughts About the Sixties and the introduction to Todd Gitlin's The Sixties: Years of Hope, Days of Rage both try to explain the authors' reasons for writing their books. Both books, based on nostalgia, deal with the good and the bad which have come out of the sixties. However, while Collier and Horowitz describe the sixties more as a time of destruction, Gitlin places more emphasis on the spirited atmosphere which led to the destruction. This destruction they all refer to includes the diminished placement of trust in America, the ris ...
    Related: comparison, destructive, black panther party, works cited, genet
  • Emma - 640 words
    Emma Emma Austen, Jane. Emma. New York: Bantam Books, 1981. Emma takes place in Hartfield, which is a part of Highbury, England. Highbury was a large and populous village, but Hartfield was much quieter and secluded. The story is in a time where you only married people of your own social status. Therefore, the story probably takes place in the Eighteenth century but there is no direct reference to the time at which the story takes place. It was a romantic time where women were concerned with marrying their true loves, but only if they were of their same class. The importance of the village in which Emma lives is that to entertain herself she engages herself in matchmaking activities. The mai ...
    Related: emma, emma woodhouse, eighteenth century, self image, match
  • Hamlets Madness - 1,211 words
    ... o'er me with your wings, you heavenly guards! What would your gracious figure?" The queen, oblivious to Hamlet's hallucinations, cries out: "Alas, he's mad!" (III.iv.107-109). The queen is now convinced of Hamlet's psychosis, as she has what appears to be solid evidence that Hamlet is hallucinating and talking to himself. After Hamlet kills Polonius, he will not tell anyone where the body is. Instead, he assumes the role of a "madman" once again, speaking in a grotesque and ironic manner. The king asks him, "Now Hamlet, where's Polonius?" Hamlet replies with a sarcastic remark: "At supper." He continues, "Not where he eats, but where 'a is eaten." (IV.iii.16-19) Hamlet is clearly disresp ...
    Related: hamlet prince of denmark, madness, ophelia hamlet, polonius hamlet, state university
  • I Recently Read The Book Bonfire Of The Vanities By Tom Wolfe Mr Wolfe Holds A - 786 words
    I recently read the book Bonfire of the Vanities by Tom Wolfe. Mr. Wolfe holds a doctorate in American Studies from Yale University and is the author of many non fiction books such as The Right Stuff, In Our Time, and Clutter and Vine. Bonfire of the Vanities was his first fiction work. This book was published by Bantam Books Inc. and was copyrighted in 1987. I believe the theme of this book to be true to oneself and trust no one but oneself. It is show many times in this book that people will go below their morals simply for personal advancement. It is also shown that human nature allows for many changes of heart, in short, double crossing. The main character in this book is Sherman McCoy. ...
    Related: wolfe, african american, time passes, higgins clark, betrayed
  • Mark Twain As Philosopher - 1,135 words
    ... true murder story, letting an innocent man go free (Twain 147). Twain wrote a better closing for Tom than he ever had in real life, because in real life murder was a part of everyday life. Huck's life is also similar to Twain's, but not in such a direct way. Twain, and many of his main characters (Paul 1175), including Tom, are fatherless. Huck, and assumedly his real-life counterpart's father is a "filthy," abusive drunk and is often absent (Twain 17, 27). Huck is a dirt-poor boy who is practical for the sake of survival. Huck sees things in such a straightforward manner--as opposed to the soft-focus way of both Twain as a child and Tom-- that the coming of age is very abrupt. Huck also ...
    Related: mark, mark twain, philosopher, twain, tom sawyer
  • Maya Angelou - 1,574 words
    Maya Angelou She was born under the name Marguerite Johnson, but her brother Baily renamed her Maya. Her parents, Baily and Vivian Baxter Johnson, got divorced when she was very young. Maya grew up in a very racist town. There were many problems in her life, in which she describes in her autobiographical novel "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings". At the age of 16, she became pregnant, while experimenting if her sexual preference was males or females. She had to get numerous jobs to support herself and her son, Clyde, who was later known as Guy. In 1952, she married a man named Tosh Angelos, but due to his atheist ideals, which grew to be unacceptable to Mayas religion, the marriage soon ended. ...
    Related: angelou, angelou maya, maya, pulitzer prize, president bill
  • Networking And Telecommunication Management - 1,370 words
    Networking and Telecommunication Management "The AT&T long-distance networks crashes and millions of calls go unanswered. A computer hacker reprograms a switching station and calls to a Florida probation office are shunted to a New York phone-sex hotline. An illegal computer bulletin board publishes a pilfered BellSouth document on the 911 emergency system, which made it available to anyone who dials up". The above incidents are described in Bruce Sterlings book "The Hacker Crackdown, Law and Disorder on the Electronic Frontier, copyrighted in 1992. Bruce Sterling authored this book which seeks to explain the "people of cyberspace". Bruce Sterling digs into the bizarre world of electronic co ...
    Related: management, networking, telecommunication, luther king, computer security
  • One Day In The Life Of Ivan Denisovich Is A Story About A Man, Ivan Denisovich Shukhov, Who Is In A Russian Siberian Prisonla - 988 words
    One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich is a story about a man, Ivan Denisovich Shukhov, who is in a Russian Siberian prison/labor camp for expression of anti-Stalinistic ideas. The story describes the events of a single day in this man's life and his struggle to survive. I feel that the main theme of this book is survival. However, Ivan shows the reader that survival on your own isn't always possible. You can only provide so much for yourself on your own. People must work as a team, helping one another, in order to get things accomplished, overcome challenges, and survive. Shukhov withstands the conditions of the camp while it would be easy to give in to despair (Des Pres 49). When he arrive ...
    Related: denisovich, ivan, ivan denisovich, one day in the life of ivan denisovich, russian, siberian
  • Optical Illusions - 1,825 words
    Optical Illusions My research paper is about the anatomy of an optical illusion. Optical Illusions are relevant to aviation in that the main guidance system of most aircraft on most flights is the pilot's eyes. Everyone, including pilots, is susceptible to an optical illusion. The hazards of optical illusions are many considering that at any time during the flight they can cause a healthy and experienced pilot to become confused, delusional and generally disoriented with obvious possible consequences. This is why we must study and be aware of optical illusions so that we may be better prepared should we encounter one at a critical time. To better illustrate the origins of optical illusions I ...
    Related: optical, optical illusions, most effective, massachusetts institute, cruise
  • Repeat After Methe Taming Of The Shrew - 1,373 words
    Repeat After Me-The Taming Of The Shrew Repeat After Me As she screams at her father Katherine says "What will you not suffer me? Nay now I see She is your treasure, she must have a husband; I must dance barefoot on her wedding day, And for your love to her lead apes in hell" (Shakespeare 35). Katherine knows that her father favors Bianca because she is a goody two shoes of daughter. Kate expresses her feelings of having to be married off first because nobody in town wants her as a wife. Kate does not believe that she should be offered as a wife and then backed up with a dowry. She is quite opinionated about this, with no fear of who knows or not. Katherine's views and beliefs of marriage an ...
    Related: repeat, shrew, taming, taming of the shrew, bantam books
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