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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: reactionary

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  • A Postmodern Age - 1,398 words
    ... t is the idea that areas of existence and culture can be separated from, that is abstracted out of, other areas of existence and culture. In addition, we tend to form social groups that are largely based on abstractions (corporations, nations, economic classes, religious preferences, race (which is really an abstract rather than a physical or biological category or relationship), sexual preferences, etc.). As a result, membership in social groups tends to be unstable and transitory as one can easily move between social groups. This, again, creates a high sense of anxiety and tension; this anxiety results, on the one hand, in attempts within these abstract groups to define and redefine th ...
    Related: postmodern, social life, media images, popular culture, ties
  • Adrienne Rich - 1,719 words
    Adrienne Rich "What I know, I know through making poems" Passion, Politics and the Body in the Poetry of Adrienne Rich Liz Yorke, Nottingham Trent University, England This paper is largely extracted from my book Adrienne Rich, which is to be published by Sage in October this year...What I have tried to do for the paper is to track one thread explored by the book, which I feel runs through the whole span of Rich's thought, a thread which links desire, passion, and the body - to politics, to activism, and to the writing of poetry. Writing poetry, above all, involves a willingness to let the unconscious speak - a willingness to listen within for the whispers that tell of what we know, even thou ...
    Related: adrienne, adrienne rich, natural order, unconscious mind, feminism
  • Birth Of A Nation: The Suppression Of A People - 1,772 words
    Birth of a Nation: The Suppression of a People Birth of a Nation: The Suppression of a People America is believed to be founded as the first state founded on the notion that democracy is for all people, however this is far from the truth. Not only did it take almost two hundred years till the American government grants full opportunities to African American, they even accepted the slavery of these peoples for almost half of that time. A republic government, such as the American government, is based on the idea that all people can have an equal represented fairly and have an equal vote. This is very hard to accomplish when groups of people living within that republic are discriminated against ...
    Related: american people, colored people, suppression, point of view, new brunswick
  • British Imperialism In Africa - 790 words
    British Imperialism in Africa British Imperialism in Africa The motives of Britain's imperialist activities in Africa from 1869 to 1912 were strategic and defensive. While other motives did exist, such as to colonize, to search for new markets and materials, to attain revenge and world prestige, to convert natives to Christianity, and to spread the English style of orderly government, the main motives evident in many events of the period showed attempts to safeguard the country and protect former land holdings. As its free trade and influential relationship with Africa was threatened, Britain began to turn trade agreements into stronger and more formal protectorates and even colonies. Britai ...
    Related: africa, british, british empire, british imperialism, east africa, imperialism, south africa
  • Calvin - 1,935 words
    ... of its ecclesiastical princes, abandoned the city, which received ../cathen/12495a.htm teachers from Berne in 1519 and from Fribourg in 1526. In 1527 the arms of Savoy were torn down; in 1530 the Catholic party underwent defeat, and Geneva became independent. It had two councils, but the final verdict on public measures rested with the people. These appointed Farel, a convert of Le Fevre, as their preacher in 1534. A discussion between the two Churches from 30 May to 24 June, 1535 ended in victory for the ../cathen/12495a.htm. The altars were desecrated, the sacred images broken, the Mass done away with. Bernese troops entered and the Gospel was accepted, 21 May, 1536. This implied perse ...
    Related: calvin, supreme power, church and state, open letter, defence
  • Catherine The Great - 1,069 words
    Catherine The Great CATHERINE THE GREAT EMPRESS OF ALL RUSSIA Catherine II (a.k.a. Catherine the Great) Catherine II, or Catherine the Great, empress of all Russia, did much to continue the process of Westernization reforms began by Peter the Great. Catherine was devoted to art, literature, science, and politics. Many people say she had a great gift and was a great leader, thus she was awarded with the name "the Great" She helped develop schools, hospitals, and many other organizations for the country. She was a shrewd leader and autocrat and helped to continue and further reforms made by Peter the Great, finally making Russia a permanent European power. Originally named Sophie Frederick Aug ...
    Related: catherine, catherine the great, peter the great, orthodox church, western europe
  • Causes For Germanies Entry To Ww - 1,236 words
    Causes For Germanies Entry To Ww1 Germanies Entry into World War 1 November 25, 2000 World War One was caused solely by the aggression of one country and its allies. It was made possible by the political, military and economical environments inside the aggressor country. These all contributed to the initiation of the First World War by the then mayor European power, Germany. To the credit of the Prussians, Germany had the largest (except for Russia), best equipped and best-trained army of Europe. With their innovative use of the heavy machine gun (the Maxim gun) in protected pillboxes the German quickly had an edge in over the other European armies. To use this military might in an effective ...
    Related: entry, important role, twentieth century, german government, machine
  • Christopher Hill: The Class Strugle Of The English Revolution - 1,044 words
    Christopher Hill: The Class Strugle Of The English Revolution As a prolific historian and scholar of 17th century England, Christopher Hill has taken a unique historical perspective on the Civil War and its manifestations. He perceives the revolution as being a bourgeois insurrection . He also believes that this is the reason for the shaping of England since that time. In 1913 R. G Usher wrote: The English Revolution of 1640 is as much an enigma today as it was to Charles. It is a riddle, which has to be solved. No one has tried to solve it because all assumed it was solved be repeating the Grand Remonstrance. Every Englishman born since 1800 has...been born into a view of English history. C ...
    Related: christopher, english revolution, french revolution, industrial revolution, lower class, middle class
  • Decline Of The American Empire - 2,325 words
    Decline of the American Empire In any era there are different protagonists, playing the same game on a similar board. Like a game of monopoly, there are nations competing to become the foremost leaders of their time. They amass great wealth, powerful armies, and political sway. When the influence and might of these countries transcends the confines of their boundaries, so that they become a presence throughout the world, they become empires. At times, it seems as though one of these empires wins the game, becoming the undisputed superpower in the world. Today, there is one such nation that has outlived all of its rivals in the great game, it is the United States of America. This vast empire ...
    Related: american, american civilization, american culture, american democracy, american economic, american economy, american empire
  • Emily Dickinson - 1,611 words
    Emily Dickinson Throughout the history of literature, it has often been said that "the poet is the poetry" (Tate, Reactionary 9); that a poets life and experiences greatly influence the style and the content of their writing, some more than others. Emily Dickinson is one of the most renowned poets of her time, recognized for the amount of genuine, emotional insight into life, death, and love she was able to show through her poetry. Many believe her lifestyle and solitude brought her to that point in her writing. During Emily Dickinsons life, she suffered many experiences that eventually sent her into seclusion, and those events, along with her reclusiveness, had a great impact on her poetry. ...
    Related: dickinson, emily, emily dickinson, american history, real world
  • Explorting Masculine And Feminie Roles - 2,356 words
    Explorting Masculine And Feminie Roles EXPLORING THE MASCULINE AND FEMININE IN ISABEL ALLENDE'S THE HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS By Jodi Denny Old Dominion University Copyright (c) 1997 Jodi Denny This document may not be reprinted without the permission of the author. For permission, contact: Isabel Allende's novel The House of the Spirits is woven with dichotomy. Opposing forces are juxtaposed: rich and poor, good and evil, political left and right, birth and death, and the forces that will be explored in this paper, the masculine and feminine. The masculine and feminine are equal in importance to the world of the novel, indeed, the existence of one depends on the existence of the other. The dang ...
    Related: masculine, good and evil, poor people, salvador allende, shelter
  • French Revolution - 1,118 words
    French Revolution French Revolution French Revolution, cataclysmic political and social upheaval, extending from 1789 to 1799. The revolution resulted, among other things, in the overthrow of the monarchy in France and in the establishment of the First Republic. It was generated by a vast complex of causes and produced an equally vast complex of consequences. For more than a century before the accession of King Louis XVI in 1774, the French government experienced periodic economic crises resulting from wars, royal mismanagement, and increased indebtedness. Attempts at reform accomplished little because of opposition from reactionary members of the nobility and clergy. As the financial crisis ...
    Related: french army, french government, french revolution, provisional government, louis xvi
  • Freud - 2,304 words
    Freud Sigmund Freud was the first of six children to be born into his middle class, Jewish family. His father was a wool merchant, and was the provider for the family. From the time Freud was a child, he pondered theories in math, science, and philosophy, but in his teens, he took a deep interest in what he later called psychoanalysis. He wanted to discover how a persons mind works, so he began to explore the conscious and unconscious parts of ones psyche. Freuds parents and siblings were directly involved in allowing him to pursue this unexplored area of psychology. He was given his own room so that he could study his books in silence, and was only disturbed when it was time to eat. Freud e ...
    Related: freud, sigmund freud, stuart mill, cultural norms, disagree
  • From The Dream To The Womb - 1,418 words
    ... nce. But in Fitzgerald's secular narratives of desire, the impetus of lyric promise is decisively disintegrated by the world's crude bathos and despoliation; and the Dream lacks sanctuary beyond the sphere that resists it. Lyricism, proceeding thus to frustration, must always revert to nostalgia, to elegy: Can't repeat the past? . . . Why of course you can! (111). In the tragic chiming of these three tones - lyric promise, its failure, elegy - is composed all Fitzgerald's work. In Gatsby they are found from the outset in the opening meditation, where romantic readiness issues only in a foul dust [that] floated in the wake of his dreams, but where, in retrospect, [o]nly [dead] Gatsby was ...
    Related: american dream, dream, womb, early life, f scott fitzgerald
  • History Of Music - 1,244 words
    ... ary landmarks in the evolution of the plainchant and music as a whole was the advent of polyphony. Polyphony is the singing (or playing) of two separate melodies at the same time while still maintaining a pleasing sound. Polyphony was first used in France, with the first in very basic notation. Soon, polyphony was developed into elaborate forms in two main centres: Paris and St. Martial de Limoges. By this time, better methods of musical notion existed and so the manuscripts that remain are more familiar to modern understanding. The first experiments in polyphony were called organum. In these, a second voice (or voices) followed the chant melody at an interval of a fourth or fifth above ...
    Related: chamber music, history, music, sebastian bach, explore nature
  • Internet Hate Groups - 1,022 words
    ... in the absence of evidence to the contrary, we presume that governmental regulation of the content of speech is more likely to interfere with the free exchange of ideas than to encourage it. The interest in encouraging freedom of expression in a democratic society outweighs any theoretical but unproven benefit of censorship." -- Justice John Paul Stevens, writing for the majority .(CIEC, para 5) As a society, we've gotten quite accustomed to having our information spoon-fed to us without questioning it. We don't know how to tell good information from bad. Our own ignorance is really the enemy here, not the Nazi revisionists and certainly not the Internet. Are We Protected? There are laws ...
    Related: hate crimes, hate groups, internet sites, media awareness, freedom of expression
  • Jonathan Kozol, Savage Inequalities - 1,027 words
    ... ney on the education of these students is presently a futile endeavor. Also, any reform, which does not include such added spending, will be a tragic failure. In all six cities, a ringing matter in each school comprises of missing and damaged textbooks, supplemental materials and normal building necessities such as clean classrooms and bathrooms needed to give the students a reasonable chance to be successful. Kozol gives statistical data, which shows the more money spent on educating children; the more successful will be that education (Kozol 158). The school system, he demonstrates, is a system of separate and unequal education: Behind the good statistics of the richest districts lies ...
    Related: jonathan, jonathan kozol, savage, savage inequalities, school system
  • Joseph Mccarthy - 1,212 words
    Joseph McCarthy Throughout the early 1950s, the nation was deeply engrossed in fears of a Communist takeover. At a time when Americas fears were at their very height, Joseph McCarthy, a Republican Senator from Wisconsin pushed Americas fears to an extreme. As a ploy to get himself re-elected, and to make America hate Communism as much as he did, the Senator devised a devious scheme. McCarthy, while giving a speech, held up a piece of paper and exclaimed, I have here a list of 57 known Communists who are currently employed by the U.S. State Department (Fried, 89). A few days later, McCarthy raised the number of people on the list from 57 to 205. The reaction to McCarthys announcement was abso ...
    Related: joseph, joseph mccarthy, arthur miller, state department, reactionary
  • Julius Caesar - 237 words
    Julius Caesar Born in Rome on July 12 or 13, 100 BC, Caesar belonged to the prestigious Julian clan; yet from early childhood he knew controversy. His uncle by marriage was Gaius Marius, leader of the Populares. This party supported agrarian reform and was opposed by the reactionary Optimates, a senatorial faction. Marius was seven times consul (chief magistrate), and the last year he held office, just before his death in 86 BC, he exacted a terrifying toll on the Optimates. At the same time he saw to it that young Caesar was appointed flamen dialis, one of an archaic priesthood with no power. This identified him with his uncle's extremist politics, and his marriage in 84 BC to Cornelia, the ...
    Related: caesar, julius, julius caesar, early childhood, last year
  • Julius Caesar - 973 words
    Julius Caesar Life of Julius Caesar was a strong leader for the Romans who changed the course of the history of the Greek - Roman world decisively and irreversibly. With his courage and strength he created a strong empire. What happened during his early political career? How did he become such a strong dictator of the Roman Empire? What events led up to the making of the first triumvirate? How did he rise over the other two in the triumvirate and why did he choose to take over? What happened during his reign as dictator of Rome? What events led up to the assassination of Caesar? What happened after he was killed? Caesar was a major part of the Roman Empire because of his strength and his str ...
    Related: caesar, julius, julius caesar, roman empire, greek / roman
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