Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: rationalism

  • 47 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • A Comparison Of Coleridge's Rationalism To Wordsworth's Liberalism - 1,720 words
    A Comparison Of Coleridge'S Rationalism To Wordsworth'S Liberalism All friendships grow and nurture each other through time. The friendship between Coleridge and Wordsworth allowed for a special relationship of both criticism and admiration to develop. As their friendship matured, they would play important roles in each other's works, culminating in their joint publication of Lyrical Ballads, which is said to mark the beginning of the Romantic period and be a combination of their best works. Despite their basic differences in poetic styles and philosophical beliefs, they would help each other create numerous works renown for their depth and creativity. Coleridge was a reserved dreamer, a tru ...
    Related: comparison, liberalism, rationalism, young boy, samuel taylor coleridge
  • A Postmodern Age - 1,423 words
    A Post-Modern Age? A Post-Modern Age? Introduction: Post-Modernism can be described as a particular style of thought. It is a concept that correlates the emergence of new features and types of social life and economic order in a culture; often called modernization, post-industrial, consumer, media, or multinational capitalistic societies. In Modernity, we have the sense or idea that the present is discontinuous with the past, that through a process of social, technological, and cultural change (either through improvement, that is, progress, or through decline) life in the present is fundamentally different from life in the past. This sense or idea as a world view contrasts with what is commo ...
    Related: postmodern, american market, european history, post modern, depot
  • A Universal Perspective On Belief: - 1,897 words
    A Universal Perspective On Belief: A Universal Perspective on Belief: A Response to Pragmatic and Cartesian Approaches to Epistemology By Britta Rempel (*note to reader:I hope this gives all of you struggling with some concepts in Intro to Philosophy a clearer view on how to approach your own paper, please do not plagerise) The approaches given by Pierce and Nagel to the epistemological questions of doubt and belief, though diverse in that they are strictly pragmatist and Cartesian, contain a similar underlying principle. They both serve to show that belief cannot come from any source that appeals to one's feelings or purposes, experiences or impressions. Beliefs must arise from a non-person ...
    Related: fetal alcohol syndrome, alcohol syndrome, illegal drug, empiricism, stability
  • Aesthetics - 714 words
    Aesthetics 1.To try to explain how and why aesthetics is understood, as a philosophical endeavor should first start with what I think and feel through my learning experiences what is art. Art for me is what is pure about the art form and what makes it beautiful. Beauty in art is what enhances individual senses to makes us feel all our senses are united as one. When these traits come together you are in presence of a work of art in my mind and the definition of aesthetics in art. I feel that the reason aesthetics is understood as a philosophical endeavor is because we as a society need to put a label on or problems to help develop a strategy that will help conquer these problems. So to start ...
    Related: real world, different approaches, written language, metaphysics, conquer
  • Challenger - 2,357 words
    ... ere scrutinized. "Mr. OConnor - who flew on the shuttle Atlantis three months before Challenger was destroyed - said his next mission wasnt until 1991." (Price, p1) But there more to the effects than the investigations; there were also many emotional issues that had to be faced. "For the Challenger mission, Robert B. Sieck was Director of shuttle operations at Floridas Kennedy Space Center - a position he still holds. He is also 57, balding and soft spoken. On the wall of his second floor office is a formal portrait of the Challenger Crew, autographed by the seven members. ! There is also a quote from Teddy Roosevelt that he hung after the explosion. It says " the credit belongs to the m ...
    Related: challenger, shuttle challenger, space shuttle, modern physics, stars
  • Compromise Is The Key - 491 words
    Compromise Is The Key Compromise is the Key Laws are designed to protect all citizens, even though they are not clear when it comes to deciding on what happens to couples' embryos. The judge, in the fact pattern case, is torn because the parents want different decisions. He also has to remember that he will be setting a legal precedent for which other cases will be based on. The decision will be ridiculed no matter the outcome. The embryos should not be destroyed because every living thing has the right to life, there are numerous loving couples who can not have children on their own, and children are still desired by one parent. An embryo is the young of something in an early stage of devel ...
    Related: compromise, right to life, adoptive, deciding
  • Descartes On First Philosophy - 717 words
    Descartes On First Philosophy Rene Descartes Meditations in the First Philosophy is a skeptics speculation on certain inalienable truths. Descartes meditations are based on the epistemological theory of rationalism: that is if someone truly knows something then they could not possibly be mistaken. He provides solid arguments for what his six meditations stand for, and how he obtained a clear and distinct perception of "innate" ideas. In Meditations he comes to terms with three certainties: the existence of the mind as the thing that thinks, the body as an extension, and God as the supreme being. He attests that he came to these conclusions by doubting all that had been taught to him in his f ...
    Related: descartes, descartes meditations, first philosophy, modern philosophy, philosophy, rene descartes
  • Discourse Analysis - 1,627 words
    Discourse Analysis DISCOURSE ANALYSIS This discourse analysis attempts to answer several questions regarding Chairman Hyde's speech against the president. Firstly an attempt has been made to uncover some of the more prevalent themes and discourses in the hope that they will give some kind of enlightenment of American society and culture. Secondly, this analysis describes the many ways in which Chairman Hyde attempts to persuade his audience of his cause. The portrayed image of President Clinton is then focused on, and finally there is a discussion relating to the various social codes implied within Hyde's speech. It has been found that many of these areas overlap to a greater or lesser degre ...
    Related: discourse, american culture, equal justice, higher level, heroism
  • Enlightenment Of 18th Century - 905 words
    Enlightenment Of 18th Century The Enlightenment is a name given by historians to an intellectual movement that was predominant in the Western world during the 18th century. Strongly influenced by the rise of modern science and by the aftermath of the long religious conflict that followed the Reformation, the thinkers of the Enlightenment (called philosophers in France) were committed to secular views based on reason or human understanding only, which they hoped would provide a basis for beneficial changes affecting every area of life and thought. The more extreme and radical philosophes--Denis Diderot, Claude Adrien Helvetius, Baron d'Holbach, the Marquis de Condorcet, and Julien Offroy de L ...
    Related: enlightenment, jeremy bentham, modern social, human understanding, jean
  • Existentialism - 846 words
    Existentialism When the word "existentialism" is mentioned, what comes to mind? Lack of faith? Secular beliefs? It is a belief in living life. Could it be any simpler than that? Existentialists believe in free will, making choices, and living with those consequences. This is not some kind of weird "hippy" philosophy; it makes sense. Existentialistic thought is predominately a 20th century revelation. As a philosophy, it states that man possesses free will over his fate and the direction he wants his life to take. Those who follow this believe they are in a world that does not always make sense, a world that is filled with uncertainty where well-intended actions can become obscure and chaotic ...
    Related: existentialism, free will, oxford university, higher power, guilt
  • For A Genuine Empiricist The Phrase God Exists Is Meaningless - 1,528 words
    ... ng of the question, a few key concepts must first be established. What is meant by the term Empiricism? To an empiricist, the occurrence of consciousness is simply the product of experience. It is assumed that all human knowledge is acquired from experience and observation alone. It is believed that we are born with an empty slate; it is through sense perception that our knowledge begins to form and shape our mind. Empiricism is against the idea of spontaneous or a priori thought (knowledge that is independent of all particular experience). They believe in a posteriori knowledge, which is derives from experience alone. The belief opposing Empiricism is that of Rationalism. In this philos ...
    Related: genuine, meaningless, phrase, concerning human, gods existence
  • Henri Bergson - 753 words
    Henri Bergson Henri Bergson was a modern philosopher who merged empiricism with a bit of rationalism to become part of a new empiricism that held room for intuition and movement with a flux through time. He essentially refused sciences claim to explain the universe in mechanical conditions; instead he considered life an unending creation, a matter of change and time unlike something static. In Henri Bergsons (originally?) dualistic realm there existed the distinctive modes of consciousness or knowing: analysis and intuition. Intuition consists of an internal grasping of an object, consequently capturing its very essence or heart. Analysis is basically an external or relative way to understan ...
    Related: bergson, henri, henri bergson, human experience, scientific process
  • Henri Bergsonanalysis And Intuition - 759 words
    Henri Bergson-Analysis And Intuition Analysis and Intuition Henri Bergson was a modern philosopher who merged empiricism with a bit of rationalism to become part of a new empiricism that held room for intuition and movement with a flux through time. He essentially refused sciences claim to explain the universe in mechanical conditions; instead he considered life an unending creation, a matter of change and time unlike something static. In Henri Bergsons (originally?) dualistic realm there existed the distinctive modes of consciousness or knowing: analysis and intuition. Intuition consists of an internal grasping of an object, consequently capturing its very essence or heart. Analysis is basi ...
    Related: henri, henri bergson, intuition, scientific process, human experience
  • Ideas Of The Parthenon - 1,433 words
    Ideas Of The Parthenon Ideas of the Parthenon The Greek people of the 5th century BC created a culture that was deeply rooted in philosophy and the arts. Their endless search for their place in the grand scheme of the universe and in nature around them influenced everything in their lives especially their love of the arts. Their drama, sculpture, and even architecture are all shining examples of the ideas that were so dominant in the minds of the Greek people. What could be considered the crown jewel of Greek architecture, the Parthenon, is one such of these examples. It brings into form the three principal ideas of humanism, rationalism, and idealism of the 5th century Greek people through ...
    Related: parthenon, goddess athena, human body, greek architecture, protagoras
  • Identify And Discuss The Elements Of Romanticism As Given Expression In John Keats Poem Lamia And William Wordsworths Excerpt - 302 words
    Identify and discuss the elements of Romanticism as given expression in John Keats' poem Lamia and William Wordsworth's excerpt from The Excursion. The term 'romanticism' is used to describe the aesthetic movement during the period from about 1776-1834. It was a revolutionary movement because it focused on ideals which in stark contrast to the 'Classical' movement, The Enlightenment, which preceded it. More importantly however is the fact that it reflected the social climate of the period which with the development of the French Revolution was in itself revolutionary. Rationalism, empiricism, materialism and mechanism were the central were the central philosophies of The Enlightenment and wa ...
    Related: excerpt, john keats, keats, poem, romanticism, william wordsworth
  • John Keats Romantism - 305 words
    John Keat`s Romantism Identify and discuss the elements of Romanticism as given expression in John Keats' poem Lamia and William Wordsworth's excerpt from The Excursion. The term'romanticism' is used to describe the aesthetic movement during the period from about 1776-1834. It was a revolutionary movement because it focused on ideals which in stark contrast to the 'Classical' movement, The Enlightenment, which preceded it. More importantly however is the fact that it reflected the social climate of the period which with the development of the French Revolution was in itself revolutionary. Rationalism, empiricism, materialism and mechanism were the central were the central philosophies of The ...
    Related: john keats, keats, divine powers, william wordsworth, literature
  • Kant - 1,618 words
    Kant How does one label Kant as a philosopher? Is he a rationalist or an empiricist? Kant makes a distinction between appearances and things in themselves. He also says that things in themselves exist, and that we have no knowledge of things in themselves. This could be labeled CLOSE TO NONSENSE, but we know Kant better than that. No matter how many laps on the track of metaphysics Kant takes us through, he is still widely held as one of the greatest modern philosophers of our time. Let us explore the schools of rationalism and empiricism and compare his views with that of other rationalists and empiricists (mainly Hume), and see where he ends up on the finish line towards the nature of huma ...
    Related: kant, finish line, innate ideas, primary sources, ideology
  • Literary Paper Just Lather Thats All - 662 words
    Literary Paper Just Lather That's All Hernando Tllez, Just Lather, Thats All, is written informally and in the first person. The story is written with somewhat of a slanted point of view, as seen through the barbers eyes. The story includes many conflicts between different sides and imagery and symbols are used to communicate unspoken works and feelings between the barber and Captain Torres. But most importantly, Tllez uses imagery and symbols when describing Captain Torres and also with the shaving cream and razor blade. Tllez uses animalistic features and actions when describing Captain Torres. He said nothing when he entered (p.428). When an animal first enters a room is as if they creep ...
    Related: fort worth, works cited, point of view, vein, barber
  • Locke - 1,273 words
    ... to truths which are valid only in the field of consciousness. Is it possible to break through this iron ring of phenomenalism and attain knowledge of external beings, essences existing outside the realm of the mind? In order to affirm the existence of external things we need demonstration, since things are not known immediately. Locke admitted this fact explicitly: It is evident the mind knows not things immediately, but only by intervention of the ideas it has of them. (Essay, IV, iv, 2.) Locke believed that he could break the ring of subjectivism in which he had isolated himself, and demonstrate the existence of the three beings that constitute the object of traditional metaphysics: na ...
    Related: locke, existence of god, thomas hobbes, cause and effect, intervention
  • Locke Berkeley And Hume - 1,377 words
    Locke Berkeley And Hume Enlightenment began with an unparalleled confidence in human reason. The new science's success in making clear the natural world through Locke, Berkeley, and Hume affected the efforts of philosophy in two ways. The first is by locating the basis of human knowledge in the human mind and its encounter with the physical world. Second is by directing philosophy's attention to an analysis of the mind that was capable of such cognitive success. John Locke set the tone for enlightenment by affirming the foundational principle of empiricism: There is nothing in the intellect that was not previously in the senses. Locke could not accept the Cartesian rationalist belief in inna ...
    Related: berkeley, david hume, hume, john locke, locke
  • 47 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3