Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: radio

  • 866 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>
  • How George Carlins Filthy Words Gave The Government The Power To Regulate What We Hear On The Radio - 1,202 words
    How George Carlin's "Filthy Words" Gave the Government the Power to Regulate What We Hear on the Radio ARTS How George Carlin's "Filthy Words" Gave the Government the Power to Regulate What We Hear on the Radio The FCC v. Pacifica Foundation: GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS ON RADIO BROADCASTING In 1978 a radio station owned by Pacifica Foundation Broadcasting out of New York City was doing a program on contemporary attitudes toward the use of language. This broadcast occurred on a mid-afternoon weekday. Immediately before the broadcast the station announced a disclaimer telling listeners that the program would include "sensitive language which might be regarded as offensive to some."(Gunther, 1991) ...
    Related: government regulate, radio, radio broadcasting, radio station, regulate
  • How George Carlins Filthy Words Gave The Government The Power To Regulate What We Hear On The Radio - 1,210 words
    ... oups who do not share its mores to conform to it's way of thinking, acting, and speaking."(Gunther, 1991) Therefore, the Supreme Court looked upon Carlin's monologue as indecent but not obscene. The FCC was given the power to regulate the airwaves and prohibit broadcasters from promoting "indecent" material over the radio. After the Pacifica case the FCC has also extended the ban of indecent as well as obscene materials to 24 hours per day. Because of the 24 hour ban the previous "law of nuisance" allowing for indecent material to be "channeled" at certain times of the day was abolished. To promote strong regulation against indecent material the FCC has the authority to issue fines on br ...
    Related: government regulate, radio, regulate, state university, freedom of speech
  • Instant Global Radio, Or Web Radio, Is The Latest Manifestation Of The Internets Multimedia Successor, The World Wide Web Imp - 959 words
    Instant global radio, or Web radio, is the latest manifestation of the Internets multimedia successor, the World Wide Web. Improved technology and content are turning Web radio into a mass medium. (Hickman 30) The Web radio concept is mainly underlined by the concept of Webcasting, or broadcasting station content over the Internet. Online users who visit the Web pages of Webcasting stations can find archived and live audio covering news, business, sports, and many different types of music. (Thomas 38) Although the most prominent reason for the increase in Web radio activity is advancement in related technology, there are multiple other reasons. The key has been the development of software th ...
    Related: instant, latest, manifestation, multimedia, world wide, world wide web
  • Radio - 629 words
    Radio HISTORY Towards the end of the 19th century scientists were attempting to send messages over distances without wires. They were not searching for a means of mass-communication, but simply exploring the possibility of using electromagnetic waves in order to communicate between two fixed points. There in no single inventor of radio, it came from several international developments. The pioneers of radio studied the work of a British physicist James Clerk Maxwell, who published his theory of electromagnetic waves in 1873. It was the German physicist Heinrich Rudolf Hertz who first generated such waves electrically. Although, the waves he came up with were unable to travel large distances. ...
    Related: radio, radio station, general electric company, consumer goods, keen
  • Radio And Television - 723 words
    Radio And Television The Development of Radio and Television Radio is a part of most people's everyday lives, but more so is television. Television virtually emerged from radio, which set the foundation down for what is known today as the main source of mass media and communication. The reason being that almost all households in developed nations has a television. With such a norm it is often overlooked as to the controversy caused by the T.V which is almost literally the addition of pictures to radio. Many interesting things happened with the emergence of the television from the radio. The radio is one of the, if not most, important elements in the development of mass media. The emergence o ...
    Related: radio, television, television programming, development process, real world
  • Radio Programming - 459 words
    Radio Programming Radio Programming: Both and Art and a Science Ideally, radio programming should be more of an art than a science. It should be about what people want to hear and what the disc jockeys want to play. Station managers should strive to create quality programs, similar to like they did in the old days, before television was around. Radio is used much differently today than it was in the past. When it was first invented, families used to gather around the radio and listen to programs, similar to how families today watch television programs. Most of the programs on the radio did not feature music, like most do today. Today, radio is mostly turned on to hear news and news informati ...
    Related: programming, radio, computer system, cd player, songs
  • Radio Station Research - 1,211 words
    Radio Station Research Radio Station Research Table of Contents Introduction 2 Scope of the Study 3 Methods Used 3 Results 5 Age 5 Time of Day 6 Location 8 Recommendations 10 Target Format 10 Target Location 11 Bibliography 12 Introduction Music is a general love of almost every college student. Many develop their personalities, profiles, and various other tastes based on their listening choices. In general, many college students acquire the same spectrum of listening values. If a radio station, one that wishes to target the college student population, can discover the musical preferences of the general population of students, they will be able to grow within the specific market. Since the t ...
    Related: radio, radio station, station, standard deviation, peer pressure
  • Radio Station Research - 1,159 words
    ... time of day the person listened mostly. The following results appeared (based on the mean of the students ratings):  Morning (5am-11am)- 2.23  Afternoon (11am-5pm)- 2.60  Evening (5pm-11pm)- 2.61  Late Night (11pm-5am)- 2.56 A heavy dose of morning listeners was revealed from the survey. While afternoon, evening, and late night was approximately the same, morning showed to be the most appealing. Thus, the radio should concentrate on heavy advertising in the morning. Also, the amount of time the student listens to the radio per day was viewed. The data was separated into four categories, less than one hour, one to three hours, three to five ...
    Related: radio, radio station, station, rock music, college students
  • Radio: Early History - 1,282 words
    Radio: Early History Presentation Dialogue SOLAR ENERGY. All life on Earth depends on energy from the sun. Solar energy is the source of energy for photosynthesis. It provides the warmth necessary for plants and animals to survive. The heat from the sun causes water on the Earth's surface to evaporate and form clouds that eventually provide fresh rainwater. Solar energy is the result of thermonuclear fusion reactions deep within the sun. These reactions produce so much energy that they keep the surface temperature of the sun at about 10,300B0F (5,700B0C). Even though solar energy is the largest source of energy received by the Earth, its intensity at the Earth's surface is actually very low ...
    Related: early history, history, falls short, continental united states, mirror
  • Radio: Early History - 1,286 words
    ... itive amount of electricity. Electric ranges use 1500 watts or more per burner, so bottled propane or natural gas is a popular alternative to electricity for cooking. A microwave oven has about the same power draw, but since food cooks more quickly, the amount of kilowatt hours used may not be large. Propane and wood are better alternatives for space heating. Good passive solar design and proper insulation can reduce the need for heat. Evaporative cooling is a more reasonable load, and in locations with low humidity, the results are almost as good. One plus for cooling - th e largest amount of solar energy is usually available when the temperature is the highest. Lighting Lighting requir ...
    Related: early history, history, microwave oven, solar energy, washing
  • Radio: Making Waves In America - 1,446 words
    Radio: Making Waves In America Radio-wave technology is one of the most important technologies used by man. It has forever changed the United States and the world, and will continue to do so in the future. Radio has been a communications medium, a recreational device, and many other things to us. When British physicist James Clerk Maxwell published his theory of electromagnetic waves in 1873, he probably never could have envisioned the sorts of things that would come of such a principle. His theory mainly had to do with light waves, but fifteen years later, a German physicist named Heinrich Hertz was able to electrically generate Maxwells rays in his lab. The discovery of these amazing prope ...
    Related: america, information service, san jose, global positioning system, pittsburgh
  • Talk Radio - 413 words
    Talk Radio In Talk Radio, Oliver Stone brings together all venues of filmmaking to capture the story he wants to tell. With tremendous collaboration from the DP, the production designer, the writer, and the performers, Stone calculated a tight, moving film in high style. Beginning with the script, Stone and Bogosian formed a laborious respect in the nature of the piece. They each understood the underlying theme that Barry repeats over and over again. If you dont like it, why dont you turn it off? (sic) They went after the build up of Barrys paranoia and need for voice/attention, knowing all along he would have to die for the film to mean anything. We start the film off in the clutches of its ...
    Related: radio, radio station, talk radio, oliver stone, real world
  • The History Of Radio - 1,495 words
    The History of Radio In 1844, Samuel Morse successfully demonstrated an invention known as the telegraph. The telegraph, which Morse invented in 1832, consisted of a current charged wire, location points (A and B), and a current breaker, which could be used to send dashes and dots. These dashes and dots could be successfully understood at the other end of the cable, thus introducing the world to Morse code. Thirty-two years later, a man by the name of Alexander Graham Bell introduced a device that would come to be known as the telephone. With Grahams device, people could actually talk to each other by using a series of connecting lines placed between the sender and receiver. At the time, the ...
    Related: history, radio, radio broadcasting, radio industry, corporate america
  • 100 Years Of History - 1,781 words
    ... dium, Henry Hank Aaron, breaks the record set by Babe Ruth, and hits his 715 Th home run, the 40-year old Brave hit it off of Dodgers pitcher Al Downing. On August 8 Richard Nixon, faced with impeachment, became the first president to quit, he announced his quitting, in Washington, D.C. 1975 On January 12, the stunning Steeler defense held Tarkenton and to Vikings to a standstill in New Orleans, where the Pittsburgh Steelers went on to win their first Super bowl 16-6 over the Minnesota Vikings. On July 17-19 the American Apollo 8, with Thomas P Stafford, Vance D Brand, and Donald K Slayton, hooked up with the Soyuz 19, Aleksei A Leonov and Valeri N Kubasov. On April 29 the Vietnam war en ...
    Related: history, states history, united states history, michael jordan, bill clinton
  • 1984 Televisions Vs Telescreens - 1,437 words
    1984 Televisions Vs Telescreens 1984 Televisions Vs Telescreens TV rots the senses in the head! It kills the imagination dead! It clogs and clutters up the mind! It makes a child so dull and blind. He can no longer understand a fantasy, A fairyland! His brain becomes as soft as cheese! His powers of thinking rust and freeze! An excerpt from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, By Roald Dahl, 1964 When George Orwells epic novel 1984 was published in 1949 it opened the publics imagination to a future world where privacy and freedom had no meaning. The year 1984 has come and gone and we generally believe ourselves to still live in "The Land of the Free;" however, as we now move into the 21st Cent ...
    Related: 1984, american television, television programming, violence on television, negative consequences
  • 60s Music Influence On Our Society - 1,930 words
    60'S Music Influence On Our Society Sixties Music and How it Reflected the Changing Times Chris Montaigne Professor Shao Rhetoric II The 1960's in the United States was a decade marred by social unrest, civil rights injustice, and violence both home and abroad. These were some of the factors that lead to a cultural revolution. The revolution attempted to diverge the fabric of American society. Teenagers were living dangerously and breaking away from the ideals that their parents held. In the process they created their own society (Burns 1990). They were young and had the nerve to believe that they could change the world. Their leaders had lofty goals as well. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had d ...
    Related: american society, folk music, music, popular music, rock music, woodstock music
  • The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today's Adolescence - 1,423 words
    "The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today'S Adolescence" "The psychological and physical aspects of drug abuse in today's adolescence" Unfortunately the abuse of illegal drugs is not uncommon in today's adolescent communities. Many teenagers today use illicit drugs as a way to deal with everyday pressures such as school, after school jobs, sports activities, domestic violence and peer pressure. Adolescence has been found to be a period of weakening bonds with parents and strengthening bonds with peers (Flay, 1994). Numerous states have experienced an increase in drug related deaths (http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/stats). More than 1 in 10 of today's youth aged 12-17 were curre ...
    Related: abuse, adolescence, drug abuse, drug addiction, drug problem, gateway drug, psychological
  • A Lesson From Oliver - 5,155 words
    A Lesson From Oliver by David Jorgensen Like any other morning I was up at four, the day Oliver met with his violent death. At four in the morning the grass is wet. Now, it's still wet at 6 a.m. and even at seven, and these tend to be the hours of choice for most people wishing to appreciate the phenomenon of grass wetness. But it's a tragedy of economics that, when work starts at 5 a.m., one is not afforded the same time-options for grass appreciation as members of the sane world. Nor was this tragedy confined to my having to appreciate the wet grass while in a metabolic state more suited to hibernation. Four a.m. was my only chance to absorb all of northern Ontario's summer morning treasur ...
    Related: lesson, oliver, decision making, prime minister, initiated
  • A Lesson From Oliver - 5,261 words
    ... had little wish to draw him into this conversation. I decided to change the subject quickly. "Coincidentally, yes sir. Why I'm calling, though, is to inquire about the number of outboard motors that have gone missing since last week." "Pardon me?" The tone of his voice took a sudden sinister turn that sent a twinge through my bladder. Like the rookie I was, I had made some as yet unrecognized blunder. I felt the strong urge to conclude the interview immediately, but it was too late. He knew my name. He knew my brother's name. He knew why I'd called. He knew everything. I'd have to bluff past my own ignorance. "Well, I was wondering if the police suspected some kind of theft ring being i ...
    Related: lesson, oliver, crime scene, media coverage, nash
  • A Literary Critique Of C S Lewis - 1,048 words
    A Literary Critique of C. S. Lewis A Literary Critique of C. S. Lewis: The Case for Christianity, The World's Last Night and Problem with Pain I. Introduction II. Brief Biographical Information III. The Case for Christianity - Right and Wrong as a Clue to the Meaning of the Universe IV. The Problem with Pain - Divine Omnipotence V. The World's Last Night - The Efficacy of Prayer VI. Conclusion A Critique of C. S. Lewis "A Relativist said, 'The world does not exist, England does not exist, Oxford does not exist and I am confident that I do not Exist!' When Lewis was asked to reply, he stood up and said, 'How am I to talk to a man who's not there?'" - C. S. Lewis: A Biography Clive Staples Lew ...
    Related: c. s. lewis, critique, lewis, literature and language, world war i
  • 866 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • >>>