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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: quatrain

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  • A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning - 1,305 words
    A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Intro to Poetry Oct 10 2000 Interpretation of A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Although that it may seem that the meaning of A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning could be applied to any couple awaiting separation, according to Izaak Walton, a seventeenth-century biographer, John Donne wrote his poem for his wife, Anne Donne, right before his departure for France in 1611 (Damrosch 238). However, even though the poem is not written to an audience, many of us can learn from what Donne is trying to convey to his wife. In the poem, Donne pleads with his lady to accept his departure. He defines and celebrates a love that transcends the physical realm and expresse ...
    Related: mourning, middle ages, true meaning, john donne, greek
  • Because I Could Not Stop For Death, By Emily Dickinson - 1,214 words
    Because I Could Not Stop For Death, By Emily Dickinson 'Because I could not stop for Death - ,' A Poem of Both Marriage and Death When thinking of both marriage and death, the word "eternity" comes to mind. Marriage is looked at as a symbol of eternal love, and death is looked at as a state of eternal rest. Also, Christians consider life after death as an eternal state. In "Because I could not stop for Death - ," Emily Dickinson portrays death by describing an eternal marriage. On the literal level, the speaker remembers a time where she was carried off and eloped with a man called Death and his partner in crime, Immortality. Not realizing that going with Death meant that she would have to l ...
    Related: because i could not stop for death, dickinson, emily, emily dickinson, turning point
  • Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night - 811 words
    Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night This is a poem about the joy and sadness that comes with the flash of burning life soon blown out with nothing more then a sigh. It focuses on the sadness as those we care for go far too gently into that good night. Of those who left before their time. As this poem was written specifically for Thomass dying father it is even more poignant in the emotional weight the words convey. This poem radiates with intensity, in particular, the verse beginning: wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight is simply beautiful poetry. Addressed to the poet's father as he approaches blindness and death. The relevant aspect of the relationship was Thomas's profound re ...
    Related: gentle, good night, good thing, more important, rhyme scheme
  • Explication Of Because I Could Not Stop For Death - 702 words
    Explication Of Because I Could Not Stop For Death The poem "Because I Could Not Stop for Death" by Emily Dickinson expresses the speaker's reflection on death. The poem focuses on the concept of life after death. This poem's setting mirrors the circumstances by which death approaches, and death's ton appears kind and compassionate. It is through the promise of immortality that fear is removed, and death not only becomes acceptable, but welcomed as well. As human beings, we feel that death never comes at a convenient or opportune time. When Dickinson says, "Because I could not stop for Death," she causes the reader to ask why she could not stop. The obvious answer is that she was so wrapped u ...
    Related: because i could not stop for death, explication, life after death, human beings, emily dickinson
  • Imagery - 2,411 words
    ... ading of a poem, examining the work for meter. Meter is a regular pattern of unstressed and stressed syllables in a line or lines of poetry. BLANK VERSE A Blank Verse is a poem written in unrhymed iambic pentameter. Consider the following from The Ball Poem by John Berryman: What is the boy now, who has lost his ball, What, what is he to do? I saw it go Merrily bouncing, down the street, and then Merrily over-there it is in the water! COUPLET A Couplet is a stanza of two lines, usually rhyming. The following by Andrew Marvell is an example of a rhymed couplet: Had we but world enough and time, This coyness, lady, were no crime. QUATRAIN Quatrain is a four-line stanza which may be rhymed ...
    Related: imagery, step approach, rhyme scheme, john donne, venetian
  • John Donne - 784 words
    John Donne As a young poet, John Donne often utilized metaphors of spiritual bond in many of his Songs and Sonnets in order to explain fleshly love. Once he renounced Catholicism and converted to the Anglican faith (circa 1597), Donne donned a more devotional style of verse, such as in his Holy Sonnets (circa 1609-1610), finding parallels to divine love in the carnal union. In many ways, however, his love poems and his religious poems are quite similar, for they both address his personaes deep-seated fear of isolation by women and God, respectively. For example, in "Song," Donnes speaker tells an unknown person (presumably male) that if he would "Ride ten thousand days and nights" he would r ...
    Related: donne, john donne, roman catholicism, divine love, conversion
  • John Keats - 1,172 words
    John Keats While reading a poem the skills applied in its creation are often easily overlooked. However, it is the unsurpassed mastership of these skills what makes this particular poet the most deserving recipient of this year's prestigious POTY award. John Keats possesses unparallel poetic craftsmanship. Three of his poems: "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer," "When I have fears...," and "Ode to Autumn" reveal his genius ness at the art of poetry. The first poem: "On First Looking..." displays Keats's mastership at one of the most difficult forms of poetry: the sonnet. What makes a sonnet such a difficult form of poetry is the fact that in each line there are five accented and five una ...
    Related: john keats, keats, norton anthology, breathe, discovering
  • Leda And The Swan - 1,406 words
    Leda And The Swan Yeats's 'Leda and the Swan': Psycho-Sexual Therapy in Action W.B. Yeats's heavily anthologized poem, Leda and the Swan, can be read in endless ways: as a political poem, a poem influenced by Nietzsche's idea of Will to Power, a poem of knowledge ultimately achieved through violence. Is the poem simply referr ing to a myth? Is it addressing historical determinism? Critical methodologies attempt to address these issues and more in their treatments of Leda and the Swan. However, to understand fully the poem and its implications, a formal close reading of th e text must be combined with supplementary biographical information to inform a final psychoanalytic reading of the poem. ...
    Related: leda, leda and the swan, swan, first half, the girl
  • Poem Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night By Dylan Thomas - 1,195 words
    Poem Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night By Dylan Thomas This poem, in the form of a villanelle, is about the universal subject of death. As line sixteen suggests, the speaker is not only talking about death to us, but to his father as well: "And you, my father, there on the sad height," (l. 16) The speaker does not want his father to accept death passively. He wishes his father would fight death just as the types of men he mentions in stanzas two to five have done. For instance in stanza two, the men want to continue living until their words influence people - if they die without doing this then they would have been useless in life. As further proof - in stanza four the wild men have chas ...
    Related: dylan, dylan thomas, gentle, good night, poem
  • Robert Browning - 1,694 words
    Robert Browning The creation of a plausible character within literature is one of the most difficult challenges to a writer, and development to a level at which the reader identifies with them can take a long time. However, through the masterful use of poetic devices and language Browning is able to create two living and breathing characters in sixty or less lines. When one examines these works one has to that they are quite the achievements for they not only display the personas of two distinct men but also when compared show large differences while dealing with essentially the same subject. A brief examination of the structural aspects of "Porphyrias Lover" is needed before further analysi ...
    Related: browning, robert browning, my last duchess, more important, removing
  • Sir Phillip Sidneys Sonnet 47 From Astrophil And Stella - 929 words
    Sir Phillip Sidney's Sonnet # 47 From Astrophil And Stella Sir Phillip Sidney's Sonnet # 47 from Astrophil and Stella The sonnet is a short concise form of writing and it takes a great mind to master it. By mastering it, I mean to be able to say so much in what seems like so little space. Sir Phillip Sidney comes as close to mastering it as anyone else in his time or any other does. As the opening line says, this is about a betrayal. Strangely enough, the last line of the sonnet ends with a word that is the very essence of betrayal. The sonnet ends with the word, lie. This would cause one to expect to get an explanation of the betrayal between the first and last lines. This appears to be a s ...
    Related: phillip, sonnet, stella, true love, road ahead
  • Sonnet 29 - 357 words
    Sonnet 29 Despite popular belief, William Shakespeare was considered a great poet before a great playwright. He accomplished writing at least 154 sonnets and other poems of love. In this paper, I will analyze one of his greatest sonnets. One of the most famous of his sonnets is number XXIX. This sonnet is one long sentence, but it still follows the usual Shakespearean pattern of three quatrains (four line sections) and a couplet. It also follows the traditional rhyme scheme for Shakespearian sonnets: ababcdcdefefgg. The first quatrain tells how the narrator is feeling. From reading these four lines, you sense his loneliness and sense of abandonment by fate, G-d, love, and other men. I believ ...
    Related: sonnet, the narrator, rhyme scheme, william shakespeare, disgrace
  • Sonnet 3 - 1,561 words
    Sonnet 3 Look in thy glass and tell the face thou viewest Now is the time that face should form another, Whose fresh repair if now thou not renewest, Thou dost beguile the world, unbless some mother. For where is she so fair whose uneared womb Disdains the tillage of thy husbandry? Or who is he so fond will be the tomb Of his self-love, to stop posterity? Thou art thy mother's glass , and she in thee Calls back the lovely April of her prime; So thou through windows of thine age shalt see, Despite of wrinkles, this thy golden time. But if thou live rememb'red not to be, Die single, and thine image dies with thee. Analysis Shakespeare's "Sonnet No. Three" was written in A B A B, iambic pentame ...
    Related: sonnet, men and women, burden, reminding
  • Sonnet 64 - 1,162 words
    Sonnet 64 Derived from the early Petrarchan form, William Shakespeare's sonnets maintain an iambic pentameter however implore an uncharacteristic rhyme scheme and have a final couplet with such strength that the whole character of the form is changed creating a clear thought division between the twelfth and thirteenth line. Shakespeare's style unique sonnet style became, in his time, the predominate English form. However, some poems such as John Keats' On First Looking into Chapman's Homer retained the classic Italian form.(Crowell pg 945) Shakespeare's Sonnet Sixty-Fourhold's true to the classic Shakespearean sonnet form, having three quatrains and a finalizing couplet. Utilizing the techni ...
    Related: sonnet, dylan thomas, natural world, rhyme scheme, manifest
  • Sonnet 73 - 432 words
    Sonnet 73 Poetry is a common medium for people to express love. Sonnets are almost always about love. William Shakespeare's "Sonnet 73" is no exception. Senti-ments of love along with those of against and death are expressed through the use of figurative language. The poem is organized in such a way that, as it progresses, the reader feels the author approaching death as the use of carefully chosen meta-phors that give "Sonnet 73" such powerful imagery. In the beginning of the poem the author uses the metaphor of autumn to stand for his progression in years. Just like the leaves change and fall from the trees, the author has changed and lost his youth. The author next states a compari-son of ...
    Related: sonnet, sonnet 73, figurative language, william shakespeare, sunset
  • Sonnet 73 Analysis - 433 words
    Sonnet 73 Analysis Poetry is a common medium for people to express love. Sonnets are almost always about love. William Shakespeare's Sonnet 73 is no exception. Senti-ments of love along with those of against and death are expressed through the use of figurative language. The poem is organized in such a way that, as it progresses, the reader feels the author approaching death as the use of carefully chosen meta-phors that give Sonnet 73 such powerful imagery. In the beginning of the poem the author uses the metaphor of autumn to stand for his progression in years. Just like the leaves change and fall from the trees, the author has changed and lost his youth. The author next states a compari-s ...
    Related: sonnet, sonnet 73, william shakespeare, love poem, approaching
  • Sonnet Definition - 516 words
    Sonnet Definition A sonnet is a fourteen-line poem in iambic pentameter with a carefully patterned rhyme scheme. Other strict, short poetic forms occur in English poetry (the sestina, the villanelle, and the haiku, for example), but none has been used so successfully by so many different poets. The Italian, or Petrarchan sonnet, named after Francesco Petrarch (1304-1374), the Italian poet, was introduced into English poetry in the early 16th century by Sir Thomas Wyatt (1503-1542). Its fourteen lines break into an octave (or octet), which usually rhymes abbaabba, but which may sometimes be abbacddc or even (rarely) abababab; and a sestet, which may rhyme xyzxyz or xyxyxy, or any of the multi ...
    Related: sonnet, shakespearean sonnets, thomas wyatt, english poetry, poets
  • This Sonnet Demonstrates Shakespeares Great Ability Of Playing With Words According To Him A Person Is Tonguetied When He Has - 513 words
    This sonnet demonstrates Shakespeare's great ability of playing with words. According to him a person is tongue-tied when he has either too much or too little to say. He illustrates his idea by giving an example of an unperfect actor who forgets his lines on stage and more curiously, some fierce thing whose heart is weakened by the weight of his own strength. This use of paradox adds intensity to the sonnet and lays the foundation for the following quatrain. The first quatrain is like the silence before a storm; the way it is presented suggests that there is more to come. The actor and the beast are summoned to serve only as analogues to Shakespeare's double-edged analytical presentation in ...
    Related: sonnet, portray, actor
  • To Earthward By Robert Frost - 417 words
    To Earthward By Robert Frost English IV AP February 2000 To Earthward Robert Frost's To Earthward is an intimate lyric in which an old man reflects upon his passionate experiences with love as a youth and the lack of such experiences in his old age. Through diction, imagery and structure, the tone of the speaker changes from one of gentle nostalgia to resentment toward the ephemeral nature of love. The entire poem, which consists of eight quatrains, adheres to a structure of six syllables in the first three lines of a quatrain and four syllables in the last line. Also throughout the colloquial piece are external rhymes, which are sometimes imperfect, but are used to keep the steady rhythm. T ...
    Related: frost, robert frost, vibrant, steady
  • Uncle Sams Song - 371 words
    Uncle Sam`s Song Uncle Sam's song, "I Don't Ever Wanna See You Again" is a song about a guy who gets his heart broken by his girlfriend. In this song Uncle Sam is singing directly to a girl who was once the love of his life. He tells her that he never wants to see her again because she was a secret lover of his best friend. This song is a lot like a ballad in many ways. It uses a refrain, which is called the chorus in the lyrics. The line, "I dont ever wanna see you again," is used repeatedly through out the song. Lines two and four rhyme, which is the basic format for the quatrains. It is about disappointed love and jealousy which most early ballads were written about. "I Dont Ever Wanna Se ...
    Related: sams, song, uncle, uncle sam, the girl
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