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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: quasars

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  • Quasars - 1,856 words
    Quasars Since their discovery, the nature of quasars has been one of the most intriguing and baffling problems as evidenced by the following quotations: the problem of understanding quasi-stellar objects is one of the most important and fascinating tasks in all physics - G.Burbidge and Hoyle. The quasar continues to rank both as one of the most baffling objects in the universe and one most capable of inspiring heated argument - Morrison. The redshift problem is one of the most critical problems in astronomy today - G. Burbidge. Quasars still remain the profoundest mystery in the heavens - Hazard and Mitton. The conventional interpretation of the spectral lines observed in quasars is based on ...
    Related: quasars, milky way galaxy, early stages, hubble telescope, camera
  • Quasars - 212 words
    Quasars Stephen Ferruzza Astronomy project #3 Quasars Theories of how quasars are created is based on the idea that the universe is expanding. Amoung astronomers, the popular consensus is that the earth is in an expanding univerise and the laws of physics will hold true beyond our planet. Some astronomers belive that at the beginning of the universe was a time when many galixies would be visible to the naked eye because the universe was more condesed than it is at the present day. In the centers of many galixes would be radiant objects that looked like stars but seemed brighter than all the stars in its galixiy. Astronomers call these objects quasars andbelive their presence to be more plent ...
    Related: quasars, years away, hubble telescope, massive, formation
  • Quasars And Active Galaxies - 1,270 words
    Quasars And Active Galaxies Amy A. Zeleznik Peter Anderson GSC 158 11 November 1999 Quasars and Active Galaxies The astronomical world is full of phenomena beyond the average person's imagination. The technical tools and analytical methods astronomers use are very complex. The enormous numbers and distances are mind boggling. Theories behind astronomical phenomena are based on yet another theory. In order to understand the concept of quasars and active galaxies, one must first have a feel for the astronomical numbers involved. Secondly, a basic knowledge of the tools of the trade, and finally, a working knowledge of astronomical jargon. Once there is a working knowledge of the aforementioned ...
    Related: quasars, stephen hawking, years away, large numbers, technical
  • Black Holes - 1,163 words
    Black Holes Peters 1 Ron Peters Dr. James R. Pierce CP English 2 20 April 2000 Black Holes A Black hole is a theorized celestial body whose surface gravity is so strong that nothing, including light, can escape from within it's surface. Gravity is the key to a black hole's immense power. The black hole's strong gravity keeps captured material from escaping. For example, if Earth were the same mass it is now but had only one-fourth its present radius, the escape velocity of someone standing on its surface would be twice what it is now. Black holes have a power far greater than our minds can imagine. This report will go into further discussion on these massive holes in space. Now, though, astr ...
    Related: black hole, black holes, albert einstein, hubble space, traveling
  • Black Holes - 1,218 words
    ... stence. The singularity, to some scientists, is nature's way of saying that the present physical laws we are using are not adequate to cope with the situation-perhaps we have missed the proper application of some existing laws or, in the extreme, because new laws are needed. Other scientists are just as certain that once we have a black hole, the singularity is ruled out; they indicate that as it takes an infinite time to reach the gravitational radius and as the universe spans a finite time, the black hole simply does not have enough time to go to a singularity. Perhaps an example will serve to illustrate what happens in space-time that could give rise to a singularity. Picture a thin s ...
    Related: black hole, black holes, stephen hawking, space time continuum, possesses
  • Black Holes - 1,762 words
    ... lack Holes by Table of Contents I. What are black holes? II. Where do they come from? III. Interesting facts about black holes. IV. How are they discovered? A. X-ray Emissions B. Exotic Energy Sources C. Star speeds D. Masers E. The Baseline Array F. Hubble Telescope G. Satellites V. Quasi-Stellar Relations VI. Locations A. M87 B. Milky Way C. Andromeda D. ?????? E. NGC 6240 F. A0620-00 What are black holes? Black holes are the remains of a massive star that has collapsed and shrunk to a tiny point in space. They have all of the gravity of the star concentrated into that point. Black holes are difficult to see because they cannot be seen. They cannot be seen because they are spinning fas ...
    Related: black hole, black holes, washington times, angeles times, ronald
  • Blackholes - 1,846 words
    Blackholes Black holes are objects so dense that not even light can escape their gravity, and since nothing can travel faster than light, nothing can escape from inside a black hole . Loosely speaking, a black hole is a region of space that has so much mass concentrated in it that there is no way for a nearby object to escape its gravitational pull. Since our best theory of gravity at the moment is Einstein's general theory of relativity, we have to delve into some results of this theory to understand black holes in detail, by thinking about gravity under fairly simple circumstances. Suppose that you are standing on the surface of a planet. You throw a rock straight up into the air. Assuming ...
    Related: theory of relativity, black hole, black holes, absorption, faster
  • Blackholes - 1,808 words
    ... inclination i of the system, and several important things can be calculated. The mass function f(M) = M2^3 sin i / (M1 +M2)^2 gives a relation between the masses of the two bodies, and the semi-major axis a1=AM2/(M1+M2)^2 sin i (where A is the separation of the centers of mass) gives the size of the orbit, which can also be related to the rotational velocities of the stars. A spectroscopic binary with no visible companion would be a candidate for a black hole, and if the dim star's mass is determined to be greater than that of the visible star, it would be a promising candidate. However, this method consists of many uncertainties. Although there were no hard cases for black holes any sci ...
    Related: black holes, general relativity, electromagnetic radiation, electromagnetic, companion
  • Jocelyn Susan Bell Burnell - 468 words
    Jocelyn (Susan) Bell Burnell Jocelyn (Susan)Bell Burnell An important woman in the contribution of science is Jocelyn Bell Burnell. She is a British astronomer that discovered pulsars, which is a tiny, very dense, rapidly rotating neutron star that appear to emit radiation in pulses. Jocelyn was born in 1943 in Belfast, Northern Ireland. She was raised near the Armagh Observatory, which obviously impacted her life She graduated from Glasgow University in 1965 with a B.S. degree in Physics, and in 1968 she received a Ph.D. in radio astronomy from the University of Cambridge in 1968. Jocelyn began her studies by conducting experiments of gamma-ray astronomy at the University of Southampton. Fr ...
    Related: bell, jocelyn, susan, electromagnetic spectrum, milky way galaxy
  • Origins And Bibliography Of The Big Bang Theory - 1,935 words
    Origins and Bibliography of the Big Bang Theory ORIGINS: Background & Bibliography ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Assembled for the PHILOsophy Conference of: Computer Connection PO Box 382 BBS (609) 784-9404 Voorhees, NJ 08043 by T.A. Hare Nov. 13, 1985 Topic: Areas of interaction between philosophy, science, andreligion. Part I - Big Bang (Astronomy) Part II - Unified Field (Particle Physics) Part III - Evolution (Biology). Part IV - Theologic interaction - - - - Part II - Unified Field Theory of Particle Physics: ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ And God said, "Let there be an expanse between the waters to separate water from water." (Gen. 1:6) And God said, "Let the water unde ...
    Related: bang, bang theory, big bang theory, field theory, general theory, theory of relativity
  • Origins And Bibliography Of The Big Bang Theory - 2,022 words
    ... to all the laws of physics, such as electromagnetism. In any freely falling frame, therefore, the laws of physics should (at least locally) take on their special relativistic forms. This postulate is called the Einstein equivalence principle (EEP). One consequence is the gravitational redshift, a shift in frequency f for a light ray that climbs through a height h in a gravitational field, given by (delta f)/f = gh/cc where g is the gravitational acceleration. (If the light ray descends, it is blueshifted.) Equivalently, this effect can be viewed as a relative shift in the rates of identical clocks at two heights. A second consequence of EEP is that space-time must be curved. Although thi ...
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  • Relativity Theory - 1,755 words
    Relativity Theory The theory of relativity was introduced by Albert Einstein around the early nineteen hundereds. It is a theory which enables the human mind to understand the possible actions of the universe. The theory is divided into two parts, the special, and the general. In each part, there is a certain limit to which it explains and helps to comprehend. In the special, Einstein explains ways of understanding the atom and other small objects, while the general is designed for the study of large objects, such as planets. The theory of relativity having being created, succeeded the two hundred year old mechanics of Isaac Newton, thus showing Einstein as more of a futuristic thinker and a ...
    Related: bang theory, big bang theory, general relativity, general theory, relativity, special relativity, theory of relativity
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