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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: punitive

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  • Accidents - 1,731 words
    Accidents Aircraft Investigation Each mishap has their own characteristics and there is no substitute for good old-fashioned common sense and initiative. Each wrecked aircraft has its own story to tell if properly investigated. However Air Force guidelines are quick to point out that investigators in their eagerness seek out the causes, often ignore safe investigation practices and common safety precautions. Air Force Investigators are maybe in even more difficult position due to the hazards that are unique to the military war fighting machines, Ill discuss a few of these hazards briefly before I get into the steps of Air Force accident investigations. Munitions Extreme care must be given to ...
    Related: human body, early stages, government agencies, acquire, questioning
  • Aggression And Its Intricacies - 2,232 words
    ... 19;s quota of aggression will not cause him to kill acquaintances, let alone wage war against strangers from a different country┘.The overwhelming majority of those who have killed┘have done so as soldiers in war, and we recognize that that has practically nothing to do with the kind of personal aggression that would endanger us as their fellow citizens. (8) Here a regular serving soldier spoke with experience of seeing the numerous soldiers that "[derived] their greatest satisfaction from male companionship, from excitement, and from the conquering of physical obstacles." Those men were most likely part of the 2 percent of combat soldiers (as noted by Swank and Marchandρ ...
    Related: aggression, world war ii, francis galton, human existence, cruel
  • Agression - 2,162 words
    ... in numerous altercations as children. Not as bullies but rather as fighters, the type of person who would not back down once attacked or hurt. This seemed like a strange connection between the type of job and a similarity in childhood activities, because significantly less than a third of school populations engage in fights on a regular basis. This seems to point at a genetic capacity for violence and aggression. More informally, Gwynne Dyer has felt, through his experiences as a soldier, his genes at work as he says; Aggression is certainly part of our genetic makeup, and necessarily so, but the normal human beings quota of aggression will not cause him to kill acquaintances, let alone ...
    Related: agression, sexual offenders, classical conditioning, aggressive behavior, weapons
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,516 words
    ... emands rested upon prevailing norms of workers' interests and power. Since World War II, labor leaders have placed a disproportionate amount of emphasis on economic gains, and the collective bargaining process has gravitated toward these areas. At the same time, management has carefully guarded its prerogatives from the bargaining process.24 In this context, it seems likely that in envisioning a future strike, controllers felt that wages could and should be one aspect of it. Yet wages were not the decisive factor for most, and their other demands, derived from a far more vital, ideological interest than economic gains, evoked their passionate and surprisingly unified response. Individual ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, worlds apart
  • American Revolution - 3,384 words
    American Revolution In the aftermath of the French and Indian War, Britain needed a new imperial design, but the situation in America was anything but favorable to change. Long accustomed to a large measure of independence, the colonies were demanding more, not less, freedom, particularly now that the French menace had been eliminated. To put a new system into effect, and to tighten control, Parliament had to contend with colonists trained in self-government and impatient with interference. One of the first things that British attempted was the organization of the interior. The conquest of Canada and of the Ohio Valley necessitated policies that would not alienate the French and Indian inhab ...
    Related: american, american affairs, american colonies, american population, american revolution, american revolutionary, american revolutionary war
  • Asian Exclusion Laws - 504 words
    Asian Exclusion Laws Asian Exclusion Laws There were a very large number of local, state, and federal laws that were specifically aimed at disrupting the flow of Chinese and Japanese immigrants to the United States. Two of the major laws were the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act and the 1907-1908 Gentlemans Agreement. Although the laws had some differences, they were quite similar and had similar impacts on the immigrant population. The 1882, Congress enacted the Chinese Exclusion Act, which outlawed Chinese immigration. It also explicitly denied naturalization rights to Chinese, meaning they were not allowed to become citizens, as they were not free whites. Prior to the Chinese Exclusion Act, som ...
    Related: asian, asian countries, asian immigrants, chinese exclusion, chinese exclusion act, exclusion, federal laws
  • Berger Tompkins And Rich - 1,136 words
    Berger Tompkins And Rich Language and images are usually a way to express what someone is thinking, however, language and images can often restrict our thinking in various ways. Susan Douglas, in her essay ,"Narcissism As Liberation", writes about "the great myth...that superficial appearances can be equated with a person's deepest character strengths and weaknesses"(128). The image of what a "beautiful" and what is not is an image that is constantly restricted in our minds. These restrictions come from television, movies, or many other things that people encounter. John Berger in "Ways of Seeing", proclaims that "men survey woman before treating them. Consequently how a woman appears to a m ...
    Related: adrienne rich, berger, john berger, tompkins, ideal society
  • Boot Camps - 1,983 words
    ... e said, should be considered when designing any program for youth: Adolescents are fairness fanatics. Running any adolescent group care program is difficult because adolescents are very sensitive to anything they perceive as unfair, particularly anything that applies to the whole group. Adolescents reject imposed structure and assistance. Adolescents respond to encouragement, not punishment. Although they may change their behavior to avoid punishment, their attitudes and behaviors do not change in response to punishment (Andrews, 1990). The implications of these three factors are that youth will defend themselves against what they see as unfair, regardless of the motivation of the adults ...
    Related: boot, boot camps, juvenile court, support system, rehabilitation
  • Bulemia Nervosa - 1,015 words
    ... owever, this theory is quite controversial. Recently, familial contributions to the etiology and course of bulimia nervosa have been accounted for. Often, women who overeat or undereat have been cited to have had a childhood background of profound deprivation and emotional deficit. Such individuals learned in their families that they were not wanted, worthwhile, or valued. They did not learn to ask for help or to expect their needs to be met. They did not learn healthy ways to handle conflict, difficult emotions, or disappointments. Neither did they learn that the solution to loneliness is to seek friendship. Such individuals may have been severely abused in their homes and have no knowl ...
    Related: bulimia nervosa, nervosa, female students, support services, deprivation
  • Childhood Education And Social Inequalities - 1,136 words
    Childhood Education And Social Inequalities Early Childhood Development and Social Inequalities By All families should have the same opportunities to live a descent life. But due to the backgrounds of some families, and children, they may not have a chance for this. There are certain risk factors that have a bearing on social inequalities in health, and particularly those that are prone to preventative intervention. There are many that I could talk about, but I have picked out four of these factors to talk about. They are biological factors, family and social factors, parenting factors, and attachment. Even these I feel that I will not be able to cover completely, because there is only a cer ...
    Related: childhood development, childhood education, early childhood, social class, social development, social factors, social inequality
  • Childhood Education And Social Inequalities - 1,127 words
    ... g a mother. The parents who show this usually have children who speak less, have poorer cognitive and linguistic outcomes, are impulsive, aggressive, have social withdrawal, insecure attachments, and poor peer relationships. Maltreatment of children is another big risk-factor with significant bearing on the social class. Maltreatment is associated with aggression, and four times as many(about 20%) of maltreated children go on to become delinquent. The causes can be associated with biological psychological, and social bearings. There is no doubt that early maltreatment of children can affect their neurodevelopment as well as their behavior. If the parents have access to community resource ...
    Related: childhood development, childhood education, early childhood, social class, child behavior
  • China The Favored Nation - 1,709 words
    ... e United States by allowing United States to significantly reduce China's quotas if China violates the agreement through transshipments. Charges by the United States Customs Service of illegal transshipments by China have led the United States on separate occasions since the signing of the agreement to reduce China's textile and apparel quotas on specific products. The most recent incident occurred on September 6, 1996, when the U.S.T.R. announced that the United States would impose a $19 million dollar punitive charge against China's 1996 textile quota allowance due to China's repeated violations of the United States-China textile agreement dealing with illegal transshipments. China in ...
    Related: china, most favored nation, people's republic of china, foreign trade, intelligence gathering
  • Christianity And Islam - 1,612 words
    Christianity And Islam Christianity and Islam are two of the most significant religions since their creation. Islam means "submission" in Arabic, and a Muslim is one who submits to the will of God (Islam page 223). Christians were called so because of Jesus title Christos, which is Greek for Messiah (Christianity page 198). Both religions are very similar with only some of the beliefs and teachings being different. They also give separate messages to outsiders as to what their religions stand for. Both religions are monotheistic with a holy text and they both strive to conquer evil. Islam has a set of rules (5 Pillars of Islam) set forth to reach enlightenment while Christians basically just ...
    Related: christianity, christianity and islam, five pillars of islam, islam, houghton mifflin
  • College And Athletes - 1,860 words
    College And Athletes Sports have always been one of American's favorite pastimes. Americans love the thrill of hard competition. College athletics has always been at the heart of this. It has always been something more pure than professional athletics. In recent years college athletics has changed for the worse. Players have drifted away from what it used to mean to play college sports. They have fallen into illegal activities and have left fans disappointed. One of the reasons for this change is the lack of funds for the players. There are many benefits to paying college athletes. In many cases, scholarship athletes are treated differently than academic scholarship recipients. There are unn ...
    Related: college athletes, college basketball, college library, college sports, football team
  • Control As Enterprise: Reflections On Privatization And Criminal Justice - 2,820 words
    Control As Enterprise: Reflections On Privatization And Criminal Justice Thank you very much for the welcome, and for giving my talk. When the Fraser Institute called me last year, they rang up and said they were having a conference and we would like to invite you, and I thought I think you have the wrong person. Basically, everybody else there, except myself and one person from Nova Scotia, were in favour of privatization and very strongly in favour of it, especially with respect to prisons. It was actually very educational and interesting to engage in that debate. First of all I would like to thank you very much for the invitation and to wish you all the best with your new programme. I am ...
    Related: crime control, criminal, criminal justice, justice system, privatization
  • Control As Enterprise: Reflections On Privatization And Criminal Justice - 2,864 words
    ... ness with non-profit community groups that ran many of the halfway houses and towards corporate, commercial, and for-profit groups. Second, I think this decision signals a move away from humane or at least human forms of supervision in favour of a move toward technological forms of supervision, a move from human to technological control. Let me know talk a little bit about capsicum. A more difficult scenario arose when the Ministry of the Solicitor General was approached by the private sector to try and market capsicum for use by police officers. Capsicum is a form of pepper which when packaged in a can and sprayed has the effect of totally immobilising its human target. Now given that c ...
    Related: crime control, criminal, criminal justice, justice system, privatization
  • Crime And Punishment - 1,517 words
    Crime And Punishment The crime problem in the United States has historically been misstated and exaggerated by bureaucrats and politicians. The intentions behind these overstatements vary within each context but a common thread emerges upon closer examination. As in any capitalist society, money and material possession are the primary motivation that fuels society and people. It could be argued that FBI director Louis Freeh made his comments to the National Press Club in 1994 out of genuine concern for the American people, but realistically the statement was made in an effort to gather support and increase funding for law enforcement. Following this statement and from increased pressure from ...
    Related: crime, crime and punishment, crime control, crime problem, crime rate, crime report, property crime
  • Deviant Behavior - 1,203 words
    Deviant Behavior A person would be considered to be acting deviantly in society if they are violating what the significant social norm in that particular culture is. What causes humans to act certain ways is a disputed topic among researchers for some time now. There are three types of researchers that have tried to answer this question. There is the psychological answer, biological answer, and the sociological answer. With all of the studies that have been performed, no one group has come up with an exact reason to why people behave deviantly. Although, sociologists theories have not been disproved as often as the psychologists and biologists theories because their experiments are too hard ...
    Related: deviant, deviant behavior, more harm, sociological perspective, supportive
  • Divorce And Children, Affects Of - 1,388 words
    Divorce And Children, Affects Of The Affects of Divorce on Children As a child, there are many things that affect a view, memory, opinion, or attitude. Children have many of their own daily struggles to cope with, as peer pressures are an example. As an adult, we sometimes forget what it is like to be a child dealing with some of the childhood pressures. Many parents do not realize how something like divorce could possibly affect their children as much as it does themselves. As the case may be, children are strongly affected by divorce. Some react differently than do others, but all experience some kind of emotional change. Exposure to a highly stressful major life change event on children, ...
    Related: divorce, divorce and children, effects of divorce, parental divorce, adverse effects
  • Dressed In A Baggy Tshirt, Cotton Pants And Runners With Long Wavy Hair Falling Around Her Shoulders, She Looks Like An Ordin - 1,423 words
    Dressed in a baggy T-shirt, cotton pants and runners with long wavy hair falling around her shoulders, she looks like an ordinary teenager. Yet because of her crime she spent her "sweet sixteen" birthday locked up in one of British Columbias closed custody units for youth. Janice" which is not her real name because the Young Offenders Act prohibits publication of a youths identity is incarcerated for her part in the brutal murder of 14 year-old Reena Virk in November 1997, an event that shocked the country and prompted "Bad Girl" headlines coast to coast. What made this case so unbelievable was that seven out of eight of the teens who participated in butting out a cigarette on Virks forehead ...
    Related: cotton, falling, pants, social behaviour, alcohol abuse
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