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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: public opinion

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  • Public Opinion And Deterrence - 1,042 words
    Public Opinion And Deterrence I would characterize the public opinion on the death penalty as being an uninformed opinion. More people are in favor of the death penalty, now then back a few decades ago. People are not well informed on the statistics of the death penalty, like the number of prisoners, or the racial discrimination etc. I think that if more people were informed that some opinions would be changed. It has been shown that men over women, whites over blacks, and Republicans over Democrats, conservatives over liberals are in favor of the death penalty (Bedau 90). These statistics have been found all through the whole period that the data was collected. It doesn't really seem as tho ...
    Related: deterrence, public opinion, social issues, preventing crime, hiding
  • 1776 Vs 1789 - 1,691 words
    1776 vs 1789 The American and French Revolutions both occurred in the eighteenth century; subverting the existing government and opening the way for capitalism and constitutionalism. Because of these similarities, the two revolutions are often assumed to be essentially eastern and western versions of each other. However, the two are fundamentally different in their reason, their rise, progress, termination, and in the events that followed, even to the present. The American Revolution was not primarily fought for independence. Independence was an almost accidental by-product of the Americans attempt to rebel against and remove unfair taxes levied on them by British Parliament. Through propaga ...
    Related: working class, middle class, great britain, master, propaganda
  • A Reaction To Uncle Toms Cabin - 1,339 words
    A Reaction To Uncle Tom's Cabin Lauren Richmond History 201 April 1, 1999 A Reaction to Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin "So this is the little lady who made this big war." Abraham Lincoln's legendary comment upon meeting Harriet Beecher Stowe demonstrates the significant place her novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin, holds in American history. Published in book form in 1852, the novel quickly became a national bestseller and stirred up strong emotions in both the North and South. The context in which Uncle Tom's Cabin was written, therefore, is just as significant as the actual content. Among other things, Stowe's publication of her novel was stimulated by the increasing tensions among the na ...
    Related: cabin, toms, toms cabin, uncle, uncle tom's cabin, uncle toms cabin
  • Abortion - 2,207 words
    ... about abortion and that the time was right for a professionally ambitious leaders to take advantage of the still unfocused opposition of regular physicians to abortion. Horatio Storer laid the groundwork for the anti-abortion campaign he launched later in the year by writing influential physicians all around the country early in 1857 and inquiring about the abortion laws in each of their states (148-149). Reactions around the country continued to bode well for the success of Storer's national project. Still another prominent professor of obstetrics, Dr. Jesse Boring of the Atlanta Medical School, who was at the AMA meeting in 1857, when Storer called for action, came out publicly agains ...
    Related: abortion, abortion laws, good faith, district attorney, unborn
  • Affirmative Action - 1,168 words
    ... or right, is really a deceptive attempt to constitutionalize gender discrimination and slam shut the doors of opportunity that both women and people of color have fought so hard to open. It places a hurdle to minorities and women that is not placed to others who seek legislation to benefit them. he elimination of affirmative action programs for women and minorities run by the state or local governments in the areas of public employment, contracting, and education that give "preferential treatment" on the basis of sex, race, color, ethnicity, or national origin would have a devastating affect on the minorities in the society but at the same time we need to keep in mind that the common per ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, organizational behavior, washington post, racist
  • Affirmative Action - 1,098 words
    ... uch problem. Arguments Against Affirmative Action After all the years that Affirmative Action programs have been taking place in several institutions to provide and end to discrimination; there are some arguments that point to the fact that such programs are not needed to provide minorities with fairness. The next few paragraphs state what those arguments are. The first argument is that people should be able to think what they want, to establish their own values about everything. This holds true as long as they do not deny anybody else's rights. The opponents of Affirmative Action programs believe that "to be free is to be wrong" therefore racists should be able to believe what they want ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, men and women, leadership conference, carefully
  • Africa - 1,680 words
    Africa European Imperialism European Imperialism European expansion was almost a certainty. The continent was relatively poor place for agriculture, which pushed Europeans outside of Europe in search of new soil. Different countries sent explorers, like Columbus and Magellan, to find unknown trade routes to India and Asia. They stumbled onto new sources for raw materials and goods and Europe was suddenly substantially profiting. The exploration of Africa, Asia, and South America provided new wealth. It increased the standard of living for Europeans, introduced them to spices, luxurious goods, silver, and gold (class notes). Later revolutions and reformers throughout the 19th and 20th centuri ...
    Related: africa, africa asia, power over, european society, indochina
  • After The Atomic Bomb - 1,201 words
    After The Atomic Bomb Introduction The development and usage of the first atomic bombs has caused a change in military, political, and public functionality of the world today. The bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki revolutionized warfare by killing large masses of civilian population with a single strike. The bombs' effects from the blast, extreme heat, and radiation left an estimated 140,000 people dead. The bombs created a temporary resolution that lead to another conflict. The Cold War was a political standoff between the Soviet Union and the United States that again created a new worldwide nuclear threat. The destructive potential of nuclear weapons had created a global sweep of fear as ...
    Related: after effects, atomic, atomic bomb, bomb, hydrogen bomb
  • After The Atomic Bomb - 1,117 words
    ... 1946 the United Nations created the Atomic Energy Commission to propose peaceful usage of atomic energy and "eventual elimination of weapons of mass destruction" ("International Agreements" 1). The Commission's attempt to somewhat control the usage of atomic energy became a failure when the Soviet Union vetoed the plan (1). In 1958, however, conferences between the United States, Great Britain, and the Soviet Union met in Geneva to discuss a treaty banning nuclear testing (1). The three nations agreed on voluntary disarmament for a full year (1). The voluntary disarmament seemed like a great leap forward for all three nations until the Soviet Union resumed testing in 1961 (1). President ...
    Related: atomic, atomic bomb, atomic energy, bomb, twentieth century
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,375 words
    Air Traffic Strike The Pressures of PATCO: Strikes and Stress in the 1980s By Rebecca Pels -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- Note on electronic format: you can access any citation by clicking on the note number. In order to leave citations and return to the main text of the document, press the Back key on your viewer. -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- On August 3, 1981 almost 13,000 air traffic controllers went on strike after months of negotiations with the federal government. During the contract talks, Robert Poli, president of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Association (PATCO), explained the union's th ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, aviation safety
  • Alexander The Great - 5,132 words
    ... 120 and the minimum 60. After the Battle 25 Macedonians fell"in the first charge. Alexander had a statue made of each of them. He then erected each statue somewhere near Granicus. He also erected a statue of himself, although he did not even die, let alone in first charge. This was a strange gesture that would never be repeated again. 2,000 of Memnon's mercenaries survived. After the battle they were chained like lions and sent back to forced labor, probably in the mines. This was not a very placatory gesture by Alexander. The reason he gave for it was that "they had violated Greek public opinion by fighting with the Orientals against the Greeks." After his victory, Alexander went across ...
    Related: alexander, alexander the great, great world, north east, indus river
  • American Has Lost Its Honor - 563 words
    American Has Lost its Honor America has always been the envy of the world due to our system of government with its leadership that has traditionally upheld the highest code of honor. In years past Americas leaders were expected to maintain high personal ethics and morals as well insure that the countries economy and standing in the world are maintained at a level that is acceptable to the American public. Recent events have highlighted the fact that honor and ethics no longer rule America. Popular public opinion and spin control have replaced Americas traditional values. The United States government conceded that it had to close some military base's but the congressman were unwilling to vote ...
    Related: american, american people, american public, president clinton, public opinion
  • American Revolution - 3,384 words
    American Revolution In the aftermath of the French and Indian War, Britain needed a new imperial design, but the situation in America was anything but favorable to change. Long accustomed to a large measure of independence, the colonies were demanding more, not less, freedom, particularly now that the French menace had been eliminated. To put a new system into effect, and to tighten control, Parliament had to contend with colonists trained in self-government and impatient with interference. One of the first things that British attempted was the organization of the interior. The conquest of Canada and of the Ohio Valley necessitated policies that would not alienate the French and Indian inhab ...
    Related: american, american affairs, american colonies, american population, american revolution, american revolutionary, american revolutionary war
  • Americas Growing Pains - 1,026 words
    America's Growing Pains Americas first two presidents, George Washington and John Adams, both resolutely adhered to the idea that America should endeavor to stay out of war at all times, and did everything in their power to evade declaring and entering into war. Throughout their reigns, war was ubiquitous in Europe, and many countries (especially Britain and France) made numerous attempts to obtain and secure Americas support. Washington and Adams both believed that America should not side with any foreign country during times of war making the fundamental purport of Americas first foreign policy the elusion of war at all costs. This policy was manifested throughout Washington and Adams invo ...
    Related: americas, north america, negative aspects, american people, seas
  • Analysis Of Kurdish Geopolitics - 472 words
    Analysis of Kurdish Geopolitics Analysis of Kurdish Geopolitics Past and Present Who are the Kurds? Most of us have heard about them but dont know who they are. Are they a race, a religion, a country? As we see from the following example, even Europeans who are much closer to the Kurds still do not have a complete understanding of the Kurds or the middle east in general: In the West, the left and liberal minded people in general, especially in the Scandinavian and Anglo-Saxon countries, have usually supported or at least expressed some sympathy with the struggles against both European colonialism and U.S. policies in Vietnam. But as soon as the problem shifted to Biafra, Southern Sudan, Kurd ...
    Related: geopolitics, kurdish, third world, anglo saxon, unfortunate
  • Anatomy Of A Psychopath - 987 words
    Anatomy Of A Psychopath In every mans heart there is a secret nerve that answers to the vibrations of beauty. --Christopher Morley Almost every person has a preconception of the darkest form of humanity: evil. One German film exemplifies this classic struggle of right and wrong, while addressing deeper emotional messages. The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari was made in 1919 and directed by Robert Weine. The film features a character named Francis, the protagonist, who seeks revenge against Dr. Caligari and his somnambulist, Cesar, whom he believes murdered his friend. In one specific scene, Cesar attempts to kill a beautiful woman named Jane, Franciss fiance coincidentally, at Caligaris request. Jud ...
    Related: anatomy, psychopath, corporate world, eastern europe, murderer
  • Antigone And Creon - 1,187 words
    Antigone And Creon Many dramatic theorists have documented their opinions of Sophocles' tragic play Antigone. They have presented their interpretations as to the motives and moral character of Antigone and Creon. I will attempt to encapsulate the basic logic behind the arguments of the critics Brian Vickers, A.C. Bradley (who interprets Hegel), and H. D. F. Kitto, and venture my own humble opinion as to their validity. Brian Vickers clearly favors the character of Antigone. He challenges Hegel and Hegel's view that both Creon and Antigone were essentially right in their beliefs. Vickers sums up Hegel's theories in a single diagram (Vickers 526), showing Creon and Antigone as forces in antith ...
    Related: antigone, creon, ancient greeks, self image, worry
  • Antitrust Legislation - 1,392 words
    Anti-Trust Legislation As many people have noticed, recently there has been a huge focus in the media on Bill Gates, and his huge Microsoft Corporation. This past Friday, May 22, 1998, a federal judge combined two lawsuits and set a trial date for September 8, 1998. This trial date will address a government request for a preliminary injunction concerning Windows 98 as well as broader issues. The Sherman Anti-trust Act was passed in 1890. Then in 1914 the Clayton Act was passed to help with Anti-trust Cases. Anti-trust Lawsuits are few and far between, but recently cases against Microsoft are stacking up all around the world. In 1890 the Sherman Anti-trust Act was passed, but it was not until ...
    Related: antitrust, legislation, computer industry, public opinion, trial
  • Ap Us History - 1,259 words
    AP US History March 1, 1997 Period 4 Treaty of Versailles: Who was at fault for its denial? The Treaty of Versailles, which was a peace treaty that called for the end of World War 1(between Germany and the Allies), was defeated in the Senate by an unknown alliance of two forces. The two forces were President Wilsons all or nothing attitude and the strong opponents of the Treaty in the Senate. William Borah (Sen, Idaho), one of the irreconcilables, brings out a clear weakness in the Covenant of the League of Nations in his speech to the Senate. The weakness is that will any country really feel comfortable, or approve of, another countrys government dealing with their domestic affairs and conc ...
    Related: history, constitutional right, treaty of versailles, foreign relations, logical
  • Attacks On The Insanity Defense The Insanity Defense Refers To That Branch Of The Concept Of Insanity Which Defines The Exten - 1,803 words
    ... actual way of mapping the brain and conclusively determining exactly what portion thereof is responsible for either type of behavior much less that one area is responsible for both. In essence even if true this theory is unprovable. There is also a statistical relationship between crime and mental illness. Guttmacker and Weihofen found 1.5 percent of the criminal population psychotic, 2.4 percent mentally defective, 6.9 percent neurotic, and 11.2 percent psychopathic (Jeffery, 1985:66). These figures are very unconvincing. Additionally they are based on old diagnostic categories and procedures which are most unreliable. Also, the meaning of neurotic or psychotic or psychopathic is uncer ...
    Related: branch, insanity, insanity defense, self defense, criminal law
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