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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: psychosis

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  • A Thematic Analysis Of Alfred Hitchcocks Psycho - 1,465 words
    A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Arts- Movies A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho has been commended for forming the archetypical basis of all horror films that followed its 1960 release. The mass appeal that Psycho has maintained for over three decades can undoubtedly be attributed to its universality. In Psycho, Hitchcock allows the audience to become a subjective character within the plot to enhance the film's psychological effects for an audience that is forced to recognise its own neurosis and psychological inadequacies as it is comp  elled to identify, for varying lengths of time, with the contrasting personalities of the film's m ...
    Related: alfred, alfred hitchcock, psycho, thematic, thematic analysis
  • Alcohol Abuse - 1,350 words
    Alcohol Abuse Alcohol is liquid distilled product of fermented fruits, grains and vegetables used as solvent, antiseptic and sedative moderate potential for abuse. Possible effects are intoxication, sensory alteration, and/or anxiety reduction. Symptoms of overdose staggering, odor of alcohol on breath, loss of coordination, slurred speech, dilated pupils, fetal alcohol syndrome (in babies), and/or nerve and liver damage. Withdrawal Syndrome is first sweating, tremors, then altered perception, followed by psychosis, fear, and finally auditory hallucinations. Indications of possible mis-use are confusion, disorientation, loss of motor nerve control, convulsions, shock, shallow respiration, in ...
    Related: abuse, alcohol, alcohol abuse, alcohol consumption, alcohol dependence, alcohol syndrome, blood alcohol
  • Alcohol Abuse - 1,364 words
    ... get a BAC that high? A 160 pound man will have a BAC of about .04, 1 hour after consuming two 12-ounce beers on an empty stomach. Your BAC will depend on how much you weigh, how much you drink, amount of time since your last drink and your gender. Women metabolize alcohol differently from men, causing women to reach higher BAC's at the same doses. Recent research is showing that true substance dependence may be caused, in part, by brain chemistry deficiences. That is one reason that substance dependence is considered a disease. And, as with other diseases, there is the possibility of taking medicine to get better. There is now promising evidence that taking medicine can correct some of ...
    Related: abuse, alcohol, alcohol abuse, alcohol and drugs, alcohol syndrome, blood alcohol, drink alcohol
  • Alcoholism - 2,059 words
    Alcoholism alcoholism Definitions and causal factors of alcoholism Alcoholism consists of a repetitive intake of alcoholic beverages to an extent that the drinker is harmed. The harm may be physical or mental; it may also be social or economic. Implicit in the conception of alcoholism as a disease is the idea that the person experiencing repeated or long-lasting injury from his drinking would alter his behaviour if he could. His failure to do so shows that he cannot help himself, that he has lost control over drinking. This conception incorporates the idea of addiction or dependence. Formal definitions of alcoholism vary according to the point of view of the definer. A simplistic, old-fashio ...
    Related: alcoholism, affective disorder, social factors, world war ii, relation
  • Alcoholism - 1,537 words
    Alcoholism Alcoholism, Alcohol is liquid distilled product of fermented fruits, grains and vegetables used as solvent, antiseptic and sedative for potential abuse. Possible effects are intoxication, sensory alteration, and anxiety reduction. Symptoms of overdose staggering, odor of alcohol on breath, loss of coordination, slurred speech, dilated pupils, fetal alcohol syndrome in babies, and nerve and liver damage. Withdrawal Syndrome is first sweating, tremors then altered perception, followed by psychosis, fear, and finally auditory hallucinations. Indications of possible miss-use are confusion, disorientation, and loss of motor nerve control, convulsions, shock, shallow respiration, involu ...
    Related: alcoholism, school counselor, alcohol and drugs, physical system, solve
  • Alzheimer's: Is There A Cure - 1,058 words
    ... y, 2001). Johnson & Johnson say that the drug will be available starting in May. Another approach to finding a cure for Alzheimer's Disease is finding something that will block molecules that are possibly responsible for the disease. Bob Vassar designed and implemented an ingenious method for isolating the gene for an enzyme called beta-secretase, which is found to be a key culprit in the disease (Garber, 2001). While other drugs that are approved only improve the functions of those with the disease, this method could actually stop the progression, not just slow it down. There are some drawbacks to this method. What is not known about the enzyme beta-secretase, though seemingly linked to ...
    Related: cure, spend time, social change, federal drug administration, psychosis
  • Amnesia And Its Causes - 1,104 words
    Amnesia And Its Causes Amnesia, the partial or complete loss of memory, most commonly is temporary and for only a short span of experience. There are both organic and psychological causes for amnesia. Some organic causes include inflammation of the brain, head injury, or stroke. This type of memory loss occurs suddenly and can last a long time. The person may be able to recall events in the distant past but not yesterday or today. If the amnesia is caused by alcohol abuse, it is a progressive disorder, and there are usually neurological problems like uncoordinated movements and loss of feeling in the fingers and toes. Once these problems occur, it may be too late to stop drinking. In contras ...
    Related: amnesia, huntington's disease, memory loss, early childhood, daniel
  • Amphetaminesmethamphetamines - 772 words
    Amphetamines/Methamphetamines Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! Amphetamines/Methamphetamines The medical use of amphetamines was common in the 1950/60's when they were used to help cure depression and to help the user lose weight. An amphetamine is a drug that is a stimulant to the central nervous system. Amphetamines are colorless and may be inhaled, injected, or swallowed. Amphetamines are also used non-medically to avoid sleep, improve athletic performance, or to counter the effects of depressant drugs. Amphetamines are addictive. Because of this, when the user discontinues use or reduces the amount that they use, withdrawal symptoms may occur. Some withdrawal s ...
    Related: long term effects, south korea, physical activity, addictive, smoke
  • Anne Sexton - 1,246 words
    Anne Sexton Anne Sexton The third decade of the twentieth century brought on more explicit writers than ever before, but none were as expressive as Anne Sexton. Her style of writing, her works, the image that she created, and the crazy life that she led are all prime examples of this. Known as one of the most "confessional" poets of her time, Anne Sexton was also one of the most criticized. She was known to use images of incest, adultery, and madness to reveal the depths of her deeply troubled life, which often brought on much controversy. Despite this, Anne went on to win many awards and go down as one of the best poets of all time. Anne Sexton was born Anne Gray Harvey on November 9, 1928 ...
    Related: anne, anne sexton, sexton, personal experience, attempted suicide
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,681 words
    ... lar were also found more likely to be asexual (defined as having a lack of interest in sex for a year prior to assessment). This is also a common finding in females (Carlat, 1997; Murnen, 1997). With anorexia, it is thought to be to due to the testosterone lowering effect of protein-calorie malnutrition, combined with active repression of sexual desire (Carlat, 1997). The high rate of homosexuality and bisexuality among males with eating disorders can serve as evidence for both psychosocial and biological views of the etiology of eating disorders. Psychosocially, homosexuality can be seen as a risk factor that puts males in a subculture system that places the same importance on looks and ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, sexual desire, sexual orientation
  • Cannabis - 1,627 words
    Cannabis Drug For the last few years, there has been much media hype about Cannabis. There have been talks about medical Marijuana, allowing farmers to use low THC types of marijuana for hemp, and completely legalizing Marijuana. The fiery debates have been brought to my attention by the media just recently. Being a teenager myself, I have become quite interested in Marijuana. Although most of my friends have tried Marijuana, and Marijuana is quite easily available where I lived in California, I have never tried it myself. I remember the time when my friend, Jeremy, was selling Marijuana right out of his locker. It was last year during PE, and I distinctly remember it. When I realized what h ...
    Related: cannabis, cannabis sativa, last year, south america, smoking
  • Cigarettes Addiction And Product Dangers - 1,722 words
    Cigarettes - Addiction and Product Dangers Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! Cigarettes - Addiction and Product Dangers It is clear that businesses have an obligation to inform their customers about their product's ingredients and dangers. Looking at the case of Rose Cipollone we see that she was a heavy smoker. Her doctor's had to remove part of her right cancerous lung and informed her that she had to quit smoking. Unfortunately, she was addicted. Her doctor's removed the rest of her lung that year and she finally quit smoking. She then sued the Liggett Group, the makers of the cigarettes she smoked. The lawsuit charged that the company knew of the link between ca ...
    Related: addiction, cigarette smoking, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, weight loss, quit
  • Civil War - 2,413 words
    Civil War In this meeting of the Southern Historical Association great emphasis has been placed upon a re-examination of numerous phases of our history relating to the Civil War. While several papers have dealt with certain forces which helped bring about the Civil War, none has attempted a general synthesis of causes. This synthesis has been the task assumed by the retiring president of the Association. Before attempting to say what were the causes of the American Civil War, first let me say what were not the causes of this war. Perhaps the most beautiful, the most poetic, the most eloquent statement of what the Civil War was not fought for is Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. That address will ...
    Related: american civil, american civil war, causes of the civil war, civil war, civil wars
  • Cocaine - 1,412 words
    Cocaine Cocaine is an alkaloid found in leaves of a South American shrub. It is a powerfully reinforcing stimulant. The drug induces a sense of exhilaration in the user primarily by blocking the dopamine from going into your brain. Life-long happiness will be genetically pre-programmed. "Peak experiences" will become a natural part of everyday mental health. Cocaine, alas, offers merely a tragically delusive short-cut. Before Columbian times, the coca leaf was reserved for Inca royalty. The natives subsequently used it for mystical, religious, social, nutritional and medicinal purposes. They exploited its stimulant properties to ward off fatigue and hunger, enhance endurance, and to promote ...
    Related: cocaine, human experience, sherlock holmes, drug testing, wonderful
  • Dementiaa - 4,130 words
    Dementiaa IntrodWhat is Dementia ?uction Dementia is an organic brain syndrome which results in global cognitive impairments. Dementia can occur as a result of a variety of neurological diseases. Some of the more well known dementing diseases include Alzheimers disease (AD), multi-infarct dementia (MID), and Huntingtons disease (HD). Throughout this essay the emphasis will be placed on AD (also known as dementia of the Alzheimers type, and primary degenerative dementia), because statistically it is the most significant dementing disease occurring in over 50% of demented patients (see epidemiology). The clinical picture in dementia is very similar to delirium, except for the course. Delirium ...
    Related: thyroid disease, higher level, alzheimers disease, staining, remaining
  • Drug Legalization - 1,972 words
    Drug Legalization The debate over drugs and drug legalization is an increasingly important political issue as we proceed into the twenty-first century. It is important that we proceed into this era with a keen sense of direction on this issue. Whether we increase our current laws or we proceed in the direction legalization. It is obvious that some reformation of our current policy is needed. But, the drug legalization debate is not a issue that should only concern our political officials and law makers. It should concern all of us, since all of us are affected by the laws governing the trade and use of drugs. In this paper I will address the drug legalization debate from the view of the anti ...
    Related: drug control, drug enforcement, drug enforcement agency, drug legalization, drug policy, drug prohibition, drug trade
  • Ergot - 1,204 words
    Ergot Ergot and its disease ergotism have been a worldwide plague to humans ever since humans have started to harvest and cultivate grains in all their forms. Although outbreaks of ergotism still occur periodically they have all but become nonexistent in the modern era. Ergot has had beneficial effects as well. Ergot has produced medicines, which are vital to the medicine world. Ergot has produced in the world's eyes an ugly stepsister to its medicines: LSD. D-lysergic acid diethylamide known to the world as LSD is a derivative of ergot. Ergot has had a far and wide-ranging impact on man unrealized by most people. Ergot fungi are molds that infect rye and other cereals and wild grasses (Micr ...
    Related: term effects, microsoft encarta, recreational drug, chronic, physiologically
  • General Theory Of Alcoholism - 1,572 words
    General Theory Of Alcoholism There are many theories of alcoholism, and some approaches explain and treat certain alcoholics better than others. One of the common themes throughout the readings is that addicts display a range of personal and situational problems. There is no "typical" addicted personality or emotional problem (Allen, 1996). Because of these facts, it comes as no surprise that there are also no typical assessment or treatment for these individuals. For instance, a medical/disease model of alcoholism may be more useful to some alcoholics than others. The point is that instead of rigidly applying one model, a counselor's goal is to use the models that are most effective to the ...
    Related: alcoholism, general theory, environmental factors, annotated bibliography, obsessed
  • Hamlet Is One Of Shakespeares Most Analysed Plays The Danish Prince Is Developed Into A Mysterious And Fascinating Man A Phil - 1,390 words
    Hamlet is one of Shakespeares most analysed plays. The Danish prince is developed into a mysterious and fascinating man. A philosopher and a fencer, he is a man disgusted with the rottenness of life around him and is obligated to set things right. Under the guise of madness he attempts to achieve his ends; yet there is much to puzzle over. Was Hamlet really such a good actor that he could fool everyone into believing in his madness or was he truly mad? And, why did he wait so long to carry out his revenge? Hamlet thinks too much and this drove him to an insanity that was not feigned. "... and the devil hath power/ To assume a pleasing shape..." The ghost provides Hamlet with a dilemma. Super ...
    Related: claudius hamlet, danish, fascinating, hamlet, king hamlet, mysterious, phil
  • Hamlets Madness - 1,211 words
    ... o'er me with your wings, you heavenly guards! What would your gracious figure?" The queen, oblivious to Hamlet's hallucinations, cries out: "Alas, he's mad!" (III.iv.107-109). The queen is now convinced of Hamlet's psychosis, as she has what appears to be solid evidence that Hamlet is hallucinating and talking to himself. After Hamlet kills Polonius, he will not tell anyone where the body is. Instead, he assumes the role of a "madman" once again, speaking in a grotesque and ironic manner. The king asks him, "Now Hamlet, where's Polonius?" Hamlet replies with a sarcastic remark: "At supper." He continues, "Not where he eats, but where 'a is eaten." (IV.iii.16-19) Hamlet is clearly disresp ...
    Related: hamlet prince of denmark, madness, ophelia hamlet, polonius hamlet, state university
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