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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: psychological effects

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  • The Physical And Psychological Effects Of Aids - 1,445 words
    The Physical And Psychological Effects Of Aids The reality of AIDS has insinuated itself into everyday life and language over the past decade. Though looked at as a foreigner, AIDS is in our entire society; employment, homes, and our intimate relationships. People with the AIDS virus feel trapped and have a desire to break away from the bondage that this horrible disease has with the person. However, running from the issue at hand only makes the problem worse. With ones own strength and the loving support of others a positive result can be attained. Ignorance is the main problem with AIDS today. Too many people are judgmental about the disease without having any knowledge of its nature. AIDS ...
    Related: aids, psychological, psychological effects, psychological theory, blood transfusion
  • 3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults - 1,932 words
    ... Evil Deeds done on Earth, VII. Eternal Progress Open to every Human Soul. (Spiritualism) Spiritualists are often accused of being atheists or Anti-Christian, yet our first Principle recognizes God as our Father; but who is God?. Spiritualism is universal religion recognizing such leaders as Buddha, Mohammed, Moses as well as Jesus. It does not however, claim a monopoly of Religion. Ones religion is a personal matter and any person adopting Spiritualism is free to interpret the principles according to their own awareness. Furthermore, they do not believe in a Vindictive God. They are their own judges and they shall receive compensation or retribution for what ever they have done whether ...
    Related: human soul, psychological effects, encarta online, accused, steven
  • The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today's Adolescence - 1,423 words
    "The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today'S Adolescence" "The psychological and physical aspects of drug abuse in today's adolescence" Unfortunately the abuse of illegal drugs is not uncommon in today's adolescent communities. Many teenagers today use illicit drugs as a way to deal with everyday pressures such as school, after school jobs, sports activities, domestic violence and peer pressure. Adolescence has been found to be a period of weakening bonds with parents and strengthening bonds with peers (Flay, 1994). Numerous states have experienced an increase in drug related deaths (http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/stats). More than 1 in 10 of today's youth aged 12-17 were curre ...
    Related: abuse, adolescence, drug abuse, drug addiction, drug problem, gateway drug, psychological
  • A Tale Of Two Cities Charles Dickens 18121870 - 1,809 words
    A Tale of Two Cities Charles Dickens (1812-1870) A Tale of Two Cities Charles Dickens (1812-1870) Type of Work: Historical fiction Setting London and Paris during the French Revolution (1789-1799) Principal Characters Dr. Manette, a French physician, wrongfully imprisoned for 18 years Lucie Manette, his daughter Charles Darnay, a former French aristocrat who has repudiated his title and left France to live in England Jarvis Lorry, the able representative of Tellson & Co., a banking house Sydney Carton, a law clerk Madame Defarge, a French peasant and longtime revolutionary Story Overveiw (In the year 1775, King George III sat on the throne of England, preoccupied with his rebellious colo ...
    Related: charles darnay, charles dickens, tale, tale of two cities, historical fiction
  • A Thematic Analysis Of Alfred Hitchcocks Psycho - 1,465 words
    A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Arts- Movies A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho has been commended for forming the archetypical basis of all horror films that followed its 1960 release. The mass appeal that Psycho has maintained for over three decades can undoubtedly be attributed to its universality. In Psycho, Hitchcock allows the audience to become a subjective character within the plot to enhance the film's psychological effects for an audience that is forced to recognise its own neurosis and psychological inadequacies as it is comp  elled to identify, for varying lengths of time, with the contrasting personalities of the film's m ...
    Related: alfred, alfred hitchcock, psycho, thematic, thematic analysis
  • A Time To Kill - 801 words
    A Time To Kill Tradition is a priceless component to any culture, as it has been shaped and developed by time itself. Tradition passes from generation to generation, exercising its influence through the actions and thoughts of a people. The tradition that has materialized from the history of the American South is no different. It remains a pillar of hope, faith, and pride for those southerners who embrace it. Tradition of the South dictates a way life with roots in the very foundation of the United States. While this may act as a testament to the strength and courage of the people of the south, the fact remains that the principles laid down by this tradition defy civil rights and respect for ...
    Related: rights movement, civil rights, psychological effects, klux, detrimental
  • Abortion - 849 words
    ABORTION This topic has always been a concern between the people and the government. There are approximately 1.6 million abortions. Abortion means "Induced termination of pregnancy and expulsion of an embryo or fetus that is incapable of survival. I think that basically, people can do whatever they want to do, as long as they know what they are doing. What abortion is, is that if a woman has a baby in her stomach, and she does not want to have the baby, she can go through abortion or have the baby and put the baby for adoption. The main reason for aborting a baby is because that they can not handle the responsibility, another one is because they can not afford it. There are three stages in a ...
    Related: abortion, partial birth abortion, partial-birth abortion, third stage, psychological effects
  • Abortion - 468 words
    Abortion Gary Allen English 1023 Effects of RU-486 Women who become pregnant and do not wish to have the child now have a new option, RU-486. When the abortion pill is taken, it has some effects on the female body, the main one being the end of the pregency, and some women have negative physical aspects, and finally some psychological ones also. RU-486 (abortion pill) is suppose to end the pregnecy and this is how it works. The first pill when taken works by blocking the progesterone, the female hormone made by the ovary. Progesterone is required to maintain life for the fetus. When they are blocked, the developing baby dies. Next pill prostaglandin that causes uterine contractions pushes th ...
    Related: abortion, psychological effects, female body, unborn child, torn
  • Abortion - 1,108 words
    Abortion May, 1990, Bill C-43 was passed into legislation, this was the bill stating that abortion should be treated like any other medical procedure. Regrettably, by 1991 this bill was passed into law. What had been considered an illegal act, could now be purchased for a small fee. The murder of unborn children would now be accepted by the Canadian government. Abortion goes against religious doctrine, it causes severe psychological effects in women who follow through with the procedure, and should be considered murder. The theologians of the catholic religion have shown that aborting fetus' goes against the will of God. According to the bible an unborn child is considered holy and sacred. B ...
    Related: abortion, clinical depression, right to life, long term effects, execute
  • Abortion 3 - 1,012 words
    Abortion 3 annon Every year in Canada, over 100 000 murders never reach the courtroom.1 They never reach the courtroom because they are completely legal. Abortion continues to grow across the world, hurting and killing children, as well as their mothers. Abortion is i mmoral, harmful, and actions must be taken to stop it. When a woman aborts, she is not only killing her child but is also harming herself. Legal abortion is the fifth leading cause of maternal death.2 Ten percent of women undergoing abortion suffer immediate complications, and one fifth of those are consid ered life threatening.3 Teenage aborters are at an even higher risk.4 These serious conditions include infection, embolisms ...
    Related: abortion, online available, people believe, the courtroom, woman
  • Adolescent Abortion - 1,673 words
    ... em. ADOLESCENT ABORTION LEGALIZATION Less then twenty-five years ago, any women who elected to terminate her pregnancy usually had to resort to illegal, unsanitary, and unsafe means. Abortion was frequently considered a criminal offense committed by the woman and the physician performing the procedure. The Supreme Court cases leading to the legalization of abortion began in 1963 with Griswold v. Connecticut. The court invalidated a Connecticut statute that made possession and use of contraceptives by married couples a criminal offense. The case of Griswold was later expanded to encompass the woman's right not only to prevent but also to terminate her pregnancy. In the case of Roe v. Wade ...
    Related: abortion, adolescent, birth control, young woman, fatal
  • Argument Against The Legalization Of Marijuna - 1,687 words
    Argument Against The Legalization Of Marijuna Argument against the legalization of marijuna The legalization of marijuana is one of the most highly debated about subjects facing Canadians and Americans today. Advocates of legalization use two major arguments in their effort to have marijuana legalized. First, which is by far the biggest argument is that marijuana has a significant medical use. The second argument is that marijuana does not cause harm to those that smoke it. Both of these arguments can be easily discounted by the numerous studies that have been done on the effects of marijuana both medicinal and recreational. In the following paragraphs we will explore the hard facts of marij ...
    Related: drug legalization, legalization, legalize marijuana, criminal behavior, intoxicated
  • Beloved By Toni Morrison - 1,110 words
    Beloved By Toni Morrison Toni Morrison depicts the physical and psychological effects slavery has on an African American woman and her family following the civil war in her famous book, Beloved. Throughout the novel, Morrison uses various themes to capture the impact of slavery had on the various characters portrayed in Beloved. The effects on these characters were not just physical but psychological as well. The impact of slavery has left a great impression on this family even long after the civil war. Slavery has led to physical damage, the killing of ones child, families being broken up, characters going crazy, and not being able to move on from the past that haunts them. Slavery has had ...
    Related: beloved, morrison, toni, toni morrison, baby suggs
  • Bilingual Education - 1,184 words
    Bilingual Education Bilingual Education = Unilingual Education Bilingual education in America is a sound idea, but it is not truly bilingual education, it is only bilingual for those who do not already speak English. America is a country with more and more cultures mixing together with different areas of America speaking different languages. In California, Spanish is the dominant language next to English, and in states such as Maine, French is spoken. Other cultures should not be assimilated into mainstream America completely, but America shouldnt have to bend over backwards to make life easier for foreigners. In order to become more culturally tolerant, everyone should learn a second langua ...
    Related: bilingual, bilingual education, education system, different types, foreign language
  • Brown Vs The Board Of Education - 1,416 words
    ... abolition of segregation in the school system. Brown and the other black parents testified to the fact that their children were denied admission to white schools. According to Knappman one parent testified: "It wasn't to cast any insinuations that our teachers are not capable of teaching our children because they are supreme, extremely intelligent and are capable of teaching my kids or white kids or black kids. But my point was that not only I and my children are craving light, the entire colored race is craving light, and the only way to reach the light is to start our children together in their infancy and they come up together." (467) With the experience of dealing with many court bat ...
    Related: brown, public education, kansas city, psychological impact, ruling
  • Chernobyl - 1,908 words
    Chernobyl Chernobyl Biology 10 Project For Mrs. S. Kolovetsios By Dmitry Neofitides 1/05/99 Contents Introduction The accident Release of radioactive materials Reaction of national authorities Radiation dose estimates Health impact Agricultural and environmental impacts Potential residual risks Conclusion Introduction On 26 April 1986, the Chernobyl nuclear power station, in Ukraine, suffered a major accident that was followed by a contamination of the surrounding area by the large quantities of radioactive substances. The specific features of the contamination favored a widespread distribution of radioactivity throughout the Northern Hemisphere, mainly across Europe. A contributing factor w ...
    Related: chernobyl, psychological effects, health effects, emergency management, anymore
  • Citizen Kane - 1,168 words
    Citizen Kane The classic masterpiece, Citizen Kane (1941), is probably the world's most famous and highly rated film, with its many remarkable scenes, cinematic and narrative techniques and innovations. The director, star, and producer were all the same individual - Orson Welles (in his film debut at age 25), who collaborated with Herman J. Mankiewicz on the script and with Gregg Toland as cinematographer. Within the maze of its own aesthetic, Citizen Kane develops two interesting themes. The first concerns the debasement of the private personality of the public figure, and the second deals with the crushing weight of materialism. Taken together, these two themes comprise the bitter irony of ...
    Related: citizen, citizen kane, kane, fairy tale, human relationships
  • Cloning - 1,768 words
    Cloning And Ethics Ever since the successful cloning of an adult sheep, world has been buzzing about the historical event. "Dolly" the sheep has redefined the meaning of the words "identical twin." Not only does she look like her mother, she has the same genetic makeup as her. This experiment was not only was thought of as impossible, but unthinkable. It was achieved in July 1996 by Dr. Ian Wilmut of the Roslin Institute in Roslin, Scotland. "Dolly" was announced to the public when she was seven-months old, on February 23, 1997. Since the birth of "Dolly," the Wilmuts Institute has cloned seven more sheep from three different breeds. This process that successfully worked with the sheep, is n ...
    Related: cloning, human cloning, power over, public controversy, makeup
  • Cloning - 1,768 words
    Cloning And Ethics Ever since the successful cloning of an adult sheep, world has been buzzing about the historical event. "Dolly" the sheep has redefined the meaning of the words "identical twin." Not only does she look like her mother, she has the same genetic makeup as her. This experiment was not only was thought of as impossible, but unthinkable. It was achieved in July 1996 by Dr. Ian Wilmut of the Roslin Institute in Roslin, Scotland. "Dolly" was announced to the public when she was seven-months old, on February 23, 1997. Since the birth of "Dolly," the Wilmuts Institute has cloned seven more sheep from three different breeds. This process that successfully worked with the sheep, is n ...
    Related: cloning, human cloning, more harm, life expectancy, lamb
  • Cloning Is Ethically And Morally Wrong - 882 words
    Cloning Is Ethically And Morally Wrong Cloning is Ethically and Morally Wrong The question shakes us all to our very souls. For humans to consider the cloning of one another forces them all to question the very concepts of right and wrong that make them all human. The cloning of any species, whether they be human or non-human, is ethically and morally wrong. Scientists and ethicists alike have debated the implications of human and non-human cloning extensively since 1997 when scientists at the Roslin Institute in Scotland produced Dolly. No direct conclusions have been drawn, but compelling arguments state that cloning of both human and non-human species results in harmful physical and psych ...
    Related: cloning, ethically, human cloning, morally, deductive logic
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