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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: psychological disorder

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  • A Critique Of Philosophical Approaches To Criminal Justice Reform - 1,000 words
    A Critique Of Philosophical Approaches To Criminal Justice Reform People are arrested every day in the United States. They are put on probation or sent to jail, and sometimes they are let out on parole; there are millions of people affected. In 1995 alone there were over five million people under some form of correctional supervision, and the number is steadily increasing. The incarceration rate is skyrocketing: the number of prison inmates per 100,000 people has risen from 139 in 1980 to 411 in 1995. This is an immense financial burden on the country. Federal expenditure for correctional institutions alone increased 248% from 1982 to 1992. Obviously something has to be changed in the justic ...
    Related: approaches, criminal, criminal activity, criminal acts, criminal behavior, criminal justice, criminal mind
  • Acrophobia - 1,137 words
    Acrophobia Treating Acrophobia 2 Treating Acrophobia GRADE-90 Wood (1999) describes a person suffering from a phobia experiences a persistent, irrational fear of some specific object, situation, or activity that poses no real danger (or whose danger is blown all out of proportion). Agoraphobia, social phobia, and specific phobia are three classes of phobia. Agoraphobics have an intense fear of being in a situation from which immediate escape is not possible or in which help would not be available If the person should become overwhelmed by anxiety or experience a panic attack or panic-like symptoms. People who suffer from social phobia are intensely afraid of any social or performance situati ...
    Related: college students, virtual reality, popular science, phobia, tall
  • Albert Bandura - 1,021 words
    ... reproduce it with your own behavior. 3. Reproduction. You have to translate the images or descriptions into actual behavior. Our ability to imitate improves with practice at the behaviors involved. In addition, our abilities improve even when we just imagine ourselves performing the behavior. 4. Motivation. Yet with all this, youre still not going to do anything unless you are motivated to imitate or until you have some reason for doing it. Bandura mentions a number of motives: past reinforcement (traditional behaviorism), promised reiforcement (incentives we can imagine), and vicarious reinforcement (seeing and recalling the model being reinforced). In addition there are negative motiv ...
    Related: albert, albert bandura, bandura, american psychological, social psychology
  • Alcoholism - 2,059 words
    Alcoholism alcoholism Definitions and causal factors of alcoholism Alcoholism consists of a repetitive intake of alcoholic beverages to an extent that the drinker is harmed. The harm may be physical or mental; it may also be social or economic. Implicit in the conception of alcoholism as a disease is the idea that the person experiencing repeated or long-lasting injury from his drinking would alter his behaviour if he could. His failure to do so shows that he cannot help himself, that he has lost control over drinking. This conception incorporates the idea of addiction or dependence. Formal definitions of alcoholism vary according to the point of view of the definer. A simplistic, old-fashio ...
    Related: alcoholism, affective disorder, social factors, world war ii, relation
  • Although At First Sight The Dsmiv Classification System Appears To Provide Clinicians With A Useful Framework Of Which To Vie - 1,974 words
    Although at first sight the DSM-IV classification system appears to provide clinicians with a useful framework of which to view their clients, on closer inspection however, the picture is somewhat less satisfactory. Criticisms of the system range from Wakefield's (1997) analysis that psychological presentation ranges from problems of living to harmful dysfunction; through to Livesley, Schroeder & Jang's (1994) counter-argument that evidence of discontinuity between different diagnoses and normality would support the DSM's proposal of distinct diagnostic categories. Since these issues involved are quite distinct, both these points of view are presented in relation to a cause and consequence d ...
    Related: classification, framework, university press, mental disorder, application
  • Bulimia Nervosa - 1,974 words
    ... Bulimia Nervosa has begun to be recognized in the last 30 years as a serious psychological disorder, primarily affecting women. The essential features are binge eating, which may or may not co-occur with inappropriate means of weight gain prevention. Bulimia, as well as eating disorders in general are the result of biological psychological and psychosocial factors. Urges to overeat, gorge or purge may arise as a backlash to dieting or fasting, but often as a dead-end coping mechanism for many individuals whose lives encompass stress, loneliness or inadequacy (Arenson, 1989). Bulimia appears to affect predominately women at any age from the teens into middle age. White, middle-class adole ...
    Related: bulimia, bulimia nervosa, nervosa, early life, santa barbara
  • Child Abuse - 765 words
    Child Abuse Parenting is not instinctive. If it were, everyone who had a child would be a good parent. Consequently, child abuse is a rising phenomenon in our society. Though no single factor has been identified as the cause of child maltreatment, it appears to be influenced by parents' histories, psychological resources, and economic status. Parenting must be learned. While this is often done through experience, education courses for individuals prior to their becoming parents, and close evaluation of questionable homes could enhance parents' knowledge and the childrens' well being. A large number of abusive parents have histories of physical and emotional abuse inflicted upon them during t ...
    Related: abuse, child abuse, child maltreatment, child rearing, emotional abuse
  • Depression And Suicide In Adolescents - 1,126 words
    Depression And Suicide In Adolescents Depression and Suicide In Adolescents. As a state of extreme grief and all-encompassing sadness, depression, if left untreated, may lead to a deliberate murder of oneself, suicide. Depression effects individuals with out discriminating against race, gender, or age, yet among adolescents, the incidents of depression have increased significantly. Such increase is the potential cause of the rise of suicide rates amidst adolescents. Therefore it is imperative to treat depression before attempts of suicide are made, for if neglected, such attempts could become successful. Through out the years, adolescence has been regarded as the most confusing and difficult ...
    Related: depression inventory, suicide, suicide rates, social interaction, american medical
  • Dissociative Identity Disorder And Abuse - 1,125 words
    Dissociative Identity Disorder And Abuse The condition once known as multiple personality disorder (MPD) is a very real psychological phenomenon that until recently was mis-understood and often mis-diagnosed. Dissociative identity disorder, DID, as we now call it, is a mental illness where a person's thoughts, feelings, and memories are scattered throughout two or more separate personalities within the victims mind (Appelbaum 107). In 1973 perhaps the world's most famous psychiatric patient ever, Sybil brought attention to what was until then a rare diagnoses. Sybil was ritually abused as a child and was later found to possess sixteen separate personalities, including women with English acce ...
    Related: abuse, child abuse, disorder, dissociative, dissociative disorders, dissociative identity, dissociative identity disorder
  • Divided Attention - 1,032 words
    ... lled. We memorize information so much more easily if we are able to see the whole picture and understand it to the extent that we are able to organize it. Organizing material makes learning easier because by understanding something it reduces the amount of information to be remembered. That is because we think of the elements of an idea as constituents in an interconnected whole. We then enter the package whole into memory rather than it's separate components. By integrating and unifying the information with past knowledge it reduces the effort needed to remember whatever information needs to be learned. With this knowledge at hand I have finally answered a question I have tormented my g ...
    Related: stress disorder, long-term memory, traumatic stress, network, biological
  • Eating Disorders - 818 words
    Eating Disorders Eating Disorders: Physical and Psychological Damages Anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and disordered eating. Thats all we see in the bathroom stalls on the seventh floor in Hayes Healy. What exactly are anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and disordered eating? Anorexia, bulimia, and disordered eating are habits that become an eating disorder. There are two sides to understanding the problems of eating disorders. One side is the emotional or psychological side that is affected by eating disorders. The other is the physical side. Eating disorders are harmful and can cause physical and psychological damage to ones body. According to Craig Johnson, Ph.D., and director of the ...
    Related: binge eating, disorders, eating disorder, eating disorders, psychological disorder
  • Multiple Personalities: Do They Really Exist - 1,519 words
    Multiple Personalities: Do They Really Exist? Multiple personalities- the existence of two or more distinct personalities or personality states within one person. In actuality, up to ten or even more personalities can coexist within one person, some documented cases have revealed over one hundred. But, the question remains, what exactly is the multiple personality disorder (MPD)? First I will look at what exactly the disorder is. It is, in simple terms, many complex personalities all inhabiting the same body. At any given time, one of those personalities is in control of the body. Each one has different tastes, style, thought process, and many other things that define a person. However, rese ...
    Related: multiple, multiple personality disorder, statistical manual, childhood abuse, define
  • Multiple Personality Disorder - 1,751 words
    Multiple Personality Disorder Many People in One - Multiple Personality Disorder Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) is a mental disease that exists in about one percent of the population. Much research supports the existence of this disease and its origins, causes and effects on the people in who suffer with it. This essay will clearly define Multiple Personality Disorder along with a detailed synopsis of the disease itself. The diagnosis, alter personalities, different treatments and views will indicate the disease is real. The American Psychiatric Association named Multiple Personality Disorder in 1994 Dissociative Disorder. Multiple Personality Disorder is diagnosed when a person has two ...
    Related: disorder, mental disorder, multiple, multiple personality disorder, personality, personality disorder, psychological disorder
  • Phobias - 1,014 words
    Phobias Everyone is afraid of something. Everyone experiences nervousness, anxiety and even in superior feelings around certain people. Some people possess these feelings so deeply that their fear is considered irrational. Even they realize that it is irrational and that they have a phobia. Millions of people suffer from phobias every day of their lives. The third largest psychological disorder in the United States is what psychologists have labelled a social phobia. A social phobia is the fear of social situations and the interactions with other people that can automatically bring on feelings of self-consciousness, judgement, evaluation, and scrutiny. They cannot overcome a social phobia wi ...
    Related: social phobia, talk shows, drug treatment, psychological disorder, wreck
  • Political Violence - 1,552 words
    Political Violence Political violence is like a festering wound, in that, without the aid of antibiotics the wound has the potential to depress the immune system and eventually overwhelm the individual, leading to death. In this analogy, antibiotics could represent forces that are always looking for the rogue virus's bent on the destruction of the whole body (society). I often wonder why people resort to violence, of any kind, to solve a particular problem. Questions can be asked of the individual(s) involved in carrying out the attacks, but the questions never seem to be answered in a way that will show why violence is needed to resolve conflict. Rather, excuses are rendered in the hopes th ...
    Related: causes violence, political change, political violence, violence, economic status
  • Psychoanalysis: - 1,522 words
    Psychoanalysis: Sigmund Freud was the first to developed the idea of psychoanalysis. Many physicians at that time turned down Freuds idea, that one could have mental and physical problems which dwelled from deep with in a person. However, Freud continued his studies, and has contributed a lot to the world of psychology. Freud has shown the world that the mind is a powerful tool, and he also proved that physical illness could be a link to mental thoughts. (Hacker) Since Freuds success in psychology, psychoanalysis has become a an important topic to psychology. In the 1890s, psycholoanalysis developed from a Viennese physician named Sigmund Freud. (Grolier) Freud, along with his followers used ...
    Related: human behavior, encarta encyclopedia, young women, freud, blindness
  • Sexual Dysfunction In Us - 644 words
    Sexual Dysfunction In US The article being reviewed Is from the February 22, 1999 issue of U.S. News and World Report. It is titled Not tonight, dear and is written by Wray Herbert. The article is separated into three parts dealing with sex and marriage, different statistics between the races, and the treatment of sexual dysfunction. There are a number of interesting facts in the intro that should be stated before a review of the articles body commences. The author cites a recent report consisting of interviews from 3,000 adults about their sexual lives. One of the findings from the report is that at nearly any given time almost one third of American men and 4 out of 10 American qomen suffer ...
    Related: dysfunction, erectile dysfunction, sexual, sexual desire, sexual dysfunction
  • Sylvia Plaths Novel, The Bell Jar Is Often Considered A Literary Classic For Its Description Of The Protagonists Angst Ridden - 693 words
    Sylvia Plaths novel, The Bell Jar is often considered a literary classic for its description of the protagonists angst ridden journey through depression. In the autobiographical novel, Esther Greenwood, Plaths protagonist, sinks into a profound depression after her third year at college during the 1950s. Esther battles not only a deteriorating mental stability, but also a lack of a sense of individuality, which leads to her major depressive disorder. Esther is a sensitive and intelligent woman who feels oppressed by the obvious social restrictions placed upon her, along with the pressure she feels regarding her future. Esther feels overwhelmed and powerless to break free of the emotional bur ...
    Related: bell, bell jar, classic, sylvia, the bell jar
  • Yellow - 788 words
    Yellow Wall Paper Narrative Often times what is meant to help can hinder. Positive intentions do not always bring about desirable effects. The "Yellow Wallpaper" is an example of such an occurrence. In this short story the narrator is detained in a lonesome, drab room in an attempt to free herself of a nervous disorder. During the era in which this narrative was written such practices were considered beneficial. The narrators husband, a physician adheres to this belief and forces his wife into a treatment of solitude. Rather than heal the narrator of her psychological disorder, the treatment only contributes to its effects, driving her into a severe depression. Under the orders of her husban ...
    Related: the yellow wallpaper, yellow, good intentions, short story, exercise
  • Yellow Wall Paper - 803 words
    Yellow Wall Paper Tim Johnston Johnston 1 ENC 1102 Ms. Allman 5 Oct 98 The Repressive Elements of The Yellow Wallpaper Often times what is meant to help can hinder. Positive intentions do not always bring about desirable effects. The Yellow Wallpaper is an example of such an occurrence. In this short story the narrator is detained in a lonesome, drab room in an attempt to free herself of a nervous disorder. During the era in which this narrative was written such practices were considered beneficial. The narrators husband, a physician adheres to this belief and forces his wife into a treatment of solitude. Rather than heal the narrator of her psychological disorder, the treatment only contrib ...
    Related: the yellow wallpaper, yellow, psychological disorder, good intentions, heal
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