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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: psychological

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  • The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today's Adolescence - 1,423 words
    "The Psychological And Physical Aspects Of Drug Abuse In Today'S Adolescence" "The psychological and physical aspects of drug abuse in today's adolescence" Unfortunately the abuse of illegal drugs is not uncommon in today's adolescent communities. Many teenagers today use illicit drugs as a way to deal with everyday pressures such as school, after school jobs, sports activities, domestic violence and peer pressure. Adolescence has been found to be a period of weakening bonds with parents and strengthening bonds with peers (Flay, 1994). Numerous states have experienced an increase in drug related deaths (http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/stats). More than 1 in 10 of today's youth aged 12-17 were curre ...
    Related: abuse, adolescence, drug abuse, drug addiction, drug problem, gateway drug, psychological
  • A Steercar Named Desire Blanches Psychological Breakdown - 1,469 words
    A Steercar Named Desire - Blanche's Psychological Breakdown In Tennesse Williams' play, "A Streetcar Named Desire" the readers are introduced to a character named Blanche DuBois. In the plot, Blanche is Stella's younger sister who has come to visit Stella and her husband Stanley in New Orleans. After their first meeting Stanley develops a strong dislike for Blanche and everything associated with her. Among the things Stanley dislikes about Blanche are her "spoiled-girl" manners and her indirect and quizzical way of conversing. Stanley also believes that Blanche has conned him and his wife out of the family mansion. In his opinion, she is a good-for-nothing "leech" that has attached itself to ...
    Related: blanche dubois, breakdown, named desire, psychological, streetcar named, streetcar named desire
  • Children's Psychological Adjustment To Entry Into Kindergarten - 1,388 words
    Children'S Psychological Adjustment To Entry Into Kindergarten Michael Burkhardt Page 2 From an ecological perspective, early childhood development occurs within the multiple contexts of the home, the school, and the neighborhood, and aspects of these environments can contribute to the development of adjustment problems (Bronfenbrenner, 1979). A child's psychological adjustment to entry into school for the first time can have a significant impact on the level of success achieved later in life. Children rated higher in school adjustment by their elementary school teachers, as a result of improved cognitive development, showed positive attitudes toward school resulting in better school perform ...
    Related: adjustment, children's, entry, kindergarten, psychological, psychological adjustment
  • Freud Really Did Make Some Major Contributions To The Field Of Psychology He Was The First One To Suggest That Psychological - 1,051 words
    Freud really did make some major contributions to the field of psychology. He was the first one to suggest that psychological problems might have their roots in how children were treated. Freud believed that most of our personality is formed by early childhood, much of it so early that we dont even have conscious memories. For example, people who were toilet-trained strictly and at an early age grow up to be intolerant of mess, disorder and anything that doesnt go by the rules of how things are supposed to be. In the summer of 1929, one of Freuds patients, Herman Kleirman, wrote a letter to him in order to be able to understand a dream he had. The symbolism and depiction of this dream repres ...
    Related: freud, psychological, psychology, psychosexual stages, early childhood
  • Iii The Four Goals Of Psychological Research Are To Describe, Explain, Predict, And Control The Issue The First Goal Of Psych - 723 words
    III. The four goals of psychological research are to describe, explain, predict, and control the issue. The first goal of psychological research is the method to describe each behavior and the circumstances it brings about. The goal following describe is the goal to explain. The need to know why the behavior occurs is essential. Another psychological research is to predict. Comprehending a behavior is to know when it will happen or what are the results. The final goal of psychological research is the goal to control behavior (Heiman, 1999). IIIB. Heiman (1999) discussed that scientific evidence is obtained through empirical, objective, systematic, and control research. Empirical is types of ...
    Related: psych, psychological, psychological research, research methods, devil worship
  • Once Upon A Psychological Theory - 2,118 words
    Once Upon A Psychological Theory Once Upon A Psychological Theory An Analysis of Psychological Hypotheses in Fairy Tales and Their Affect on Childhood Development INDEX I. Personal Statement II. Introduction III. Piaget A. Childhood Development i. Sensory-Motor Stage ii. Preoperational Stage ii. Stage Of Concrete Operations iii. Stage Of Formal Operations IV. Erikson A. Autonomy And Social Development i. Theory ii. The Goose Girl V. Freud A. The Id, The Ego And The Super Ego i. Theory ii. The Three Little Pigs B. Oedipus i. The Myth Of Oedipus ii. Theory ii. Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs iii. Cinderella iv. Rapunzel VI. Conclusion VII. Bibliography PERSONAL STATEMENT The object of psycholo ...
    Related: psychological, psychological development, psychological theory, stage theory, social development
  • Physical And Psychological Addictions - 270 words
    Physical And Psychological Addictions Physical and psychological addictions are very alike and very different at the same time. Addiction means that the person addicted thrives on the substance or action. Physical addictions like alcoholism and heroin are sometimes very noticeable yet, psychological addictions like gambling are very hard to diagnose. A similarity between the two types of addictions are the stages that lead up to a full blown addiction. Addictions go through many stages before reaching the pinnacle of an addiction. For example, a gambler will first start off betting a dollar, then two, then ten, then a hundred until finally the gambler is broke. An example for a physical addi ...
    Related: psychological, alcoholism, prevalent
  • Psychological Experiments - 1,206 words
    Psychological Experiments Why do psychologists do experiments? Psychology is very hard to define due to it's very nature and the wide range of topics that it covers. No two books will give exactly the same definition of 'psychology' or what subject matter it covers. However most definitions would suggest psychology to be the 'scientific study of behaviour and mental processes.' An astonishing variety of topics is covered under this definition for example topics can range from 'obesity' to'living with a divided brain', from 'expression of aggression' to 'childhood amnesia'. No one today can afford not to know psychology as it touches every aspect of life. For example: How does the way your pa ...
    Related: psychological, psychological research, young children, treating depression, cross-sectional
  • Psychological Theories And Therapeutic Interventions In The Narcissistic Disorder - 1,657 words
    Psychological Theories And Therapeutic Interventions In The Narcissistic Disorder Psychological Theories and Therapeutic Interventions in the Narcissistic Disorder The 'narcissistic personality disorder' is a complex and often misunderstood disorder. The prominent feature of the narcissistic personality is the grandiose sense of self-importance, but actually underneath this grandiosity the narcissist suffers from a chronically fragile low self-esteem. The grandiosity of the narcissist, however, is often so pervasive that we tend to dehumanize him or her. The narcissist conjures in us images of the mythological character Narcissus who could only love himself, rebuffing anyone who attempted to ...
    Related: disorder, narcissistic, personality disorder, psychological, therapeutic, therapeutic interventions, therapeutic relationship
  • Psychological Theories And Therapeutic Interventions In The Narcissistic Disorder - 1,676 words
    ... lop mirror transference, and only when his or her internal structure is sufficiently strong will the idealizing transference develop (Manfield, 1992). The self-object transference relationships provide a stabilizing effect for the narcissist. The supportive therapist thus allows the narcissist to heal his or her current low self-esteem and reinstate the damaged grandiosity. However, healing the current narcissistic injury does not address the underlying initial injury and in particular the issue of the false self. To address these issues the therapist must skillfully take advantage of the situations when the narcissist becomes uncharacteristically emotional; that is when the narcissist f ...
    Related: disorder, narcissistic, psychological, therapeutic, therapeutic interventions
  • Satanism Sociologypsychology I Am Hoping I Can Somehow Make This Seem Like A Psychological Report Without Making It Lose Any - 936 words
    Satanism Sociology/Psychology I am hoping I can somehow make this seem like a psychological report without making it lose any of it's important details. My goal in writing this paper is to hopefully make people understand and agree that Satanism is not a "Devil Worshipping," animal mutilating, child scarifying cult organization. The psychological thing comes in when people say Satanism is wrong or evil, they hear the word Satan and automatically assume that it must be bad. They make these assumptions without even taking the time to find the facts and understand them. I'll start off by saying that Satanists do not worship the devil! A Satanist believe that he or she as an individual rule thei ...
    Related: hoping, psychological, satanism, the bible, politically correct
  • The Physical And Psychological Effects Of Aids - 1,445 words
    The Physical And Psychological Effects Of Aids The reality of AIDS has insinuated itself into everyday life and language over the past decade. Though looked at as a foreigner, AIDS is in our entire society; employment, homes, and our intimate relationships. People with the AIDS virus feel trapped and have a desire to break away from the bondage that this horrible disease has with the person. However, running from the issue at hand only makes the problem worse. With ones own strength and the loving support of others a positive result can be attained. Ignorance is the main problem with AIDS today. Too many people are judgmental about the disease without having any knowledge of its nature. AIDS ...
    Related: aids, psychological, psychological effects, psychological theory, blood transfusion
  • The Psychological Affects Of The Holocaust The Holocaust Was A Tragic Point In History Which Many People Believe Never Happen - 1,082 words
    The Psychological Affects of the Holocaust The Holocaust was a tragic point in history which many people believe never happened. Others who survived it thought it should never have been. Not only did this affect the people who lived through it, it also affected everyone who was connected to those fortunate individuals who survived. The survivors were lucky to have made it but there are times when their memories and flashbacks have made them wish they were the ones who died instead of living with the horrible aftermath. The psychological effects of the Holocaust on people from different parts such as survivors of Israel and survivors of the ghettos and camps vary in some ways yet in others ar ...
    Related: history, holocaust, people believe, psychological, psychological effects, tragic
  • The Psychological Affects Of The Holocaust The Holocaust Was A Tragic Point In History Which Many People Believe Never Happen - 1,089 words
    ... r isolation. To them, the reality of what had happened was agonizing. They lived with their overwhelming personal losses whose impact is beyond intellectual or emotional comprehension. They also clung to the hope of finding some family member still alive in the new DISPLACED PERSONS' camps that were now set up. Many of the people admitted to those camps lost all sense of initiative. After the war, organizations such as THE UNITED NATIONS RELIEF and REHABILITATION ADMINISTRATION, THE JOINT DISTRIBUTION COMMITTEE and the International Refugee Organization were founded. Their work was useful but their methods were not suitable. The ex- prisoner, now a "displaced person", was brought before ...
    Related: history, holocaust, nazi holocaust, people believe, point of view, psychological, psychological effects
  • Verbal Aggression Is Message Behavior Which Attacks A Persons Selfconcept In Order To Deliver Psychological Paininfante, 1995 - 1,262 words
    Verbal aggression is message behavior which attacks a person's self-concept in order to deliver psychological pain.(Infante, 1995) Studies of verbal aggression have focused primarily on children and adolescents in educational and social settings. Very few studies were found to examine verbal aggression in adults in the workplace.(Ebbesen, Duncan, Konecni, 1974) The consequences of verbal aggression in the workplace can lead to social isolation, job related stress, health related problems, as well as problems in career advancement. It therefore should be considered important, for the individual and management, to identify and address the causes of verbal aggression. This program attempts to u ...
    Related: aggression, deliver, positive behavior, psychological, verbal, verbal behavior
  • Buckley Jr - 2,713 words
    1. WM. F. BUCKLEY JR. Last summer WFB was asked by the New York Bar Association to make a statement to the panel of lawyers considering the drug question. He made the following statement: We are speaking of a plague that consumes an estimated $75 billion per year of public money, exacts an estimated $70 billion a year from consumers, is responsible for nearly 50 per cent of the million Americans who are today in jail, occupies an estimated 50 per cent of the trial time of our judiciary, and takes the time of 400,000 policemen--yet a plague for which no cure is at hand, nor in prospect. Perhaps you, ladies and gentlemen of the Bar, will understand it if I chronicle my own itinerary on the sub ...
    Related: buckley, illegal drug, medical care, federal government, princeton
  • 1984 And Brave New World - 1,196 words
    1984 And Brave New World In Orwells Nineteen Eighty-Four and Huxleys Brave New World, the authoritative figures strive for freedom, peace, and stability for all, to develop a utopian society. The Utopian society strives for a perfect state of well-being for all persons in the community, and over-emphasizes this factor, where no person is exposed to the reality of the world. As each novel progresses we see that neither society possesses family values nor attempts to practice them. Neither are passionate nor creative in factors such as love, language, history and literature. Our society today, in general, is unsure about the future: The nightmare of total organization has emerged from the safe ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, society today, aldous huxley
  • 1984 By George Orwell - 983 words
    1984 By George Orwell "War is peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength." This is the slogan of the Ministry of Truth, a branch of the totalitarian government in post-war London. The figurehead of this government is Big Brother, who employs a vast army of informers called the Thought Police who watch and listen to every citizen at all times through a device called a telescreen for the least signs of criminal deviation or unorthodox thoughts. This novel, like Orwells earlier work Animal Farm and Aldous Huxleys Brave New World, is an example of anti-utopian fiction, that kind of fiction which shows man at the mercy of some force over which he has no control. Anti-utopian novels are usua ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, brave new world, human experience
  • 3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults - 2,024 words
    3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults Religion is primary agent of social control in our society. Due to its communally held beliefs and principles, we have a foundation on which we can rest the laws, values, and the main doctrine, of almost any society. Here in America, we have tremendous freedom in both establishing and in choosing the religion of our choice. This freedom has given birth to many non-traditional religions and practices. When discussing the topic of social control and order within a society, these non-traditional religions can be used very strongly to bring about social change within an individual then into the population. On the rise in our nation, is the ...
    Related: catholic religion, west indies, social change, catholic church, music
  • 3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults - 1,932 words
    ... Evil Deeds done on Earth, VII. Eternal Progress Open to every Human Soul. (Spiritualism) Spiritualists are often accused of being atheists or Anti-Christian, yet our first Principle recognizes God as our Father; but who is God?. Spiritualism is universal religion recognizing such leaders as Buddha, Mohammed, Moses as well as Jesus. It does not however, claim a monopoly of Religion. Ones religion is a personal matter and any person adopting Spiritualism is free to interpret the principles according to their own awareness. Furthermore, they do not believe in a Vindictive God. They are their own judges and they shall receive compensation or retribution for what ever they have done whether ...
    Related: human soul, psychological effects, encarta online, accused, steven
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