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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: psychodynamic

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  • Cognitivebehavioral And Psychodynamic Models For College Counseling - 1,595 words
    Cognitive-Behavioral And Psychodynamic Models For College Counseling Short-term or Brief Counseling/Therapy: Cognitive-behavioral and Psychodynamic Models for College Counseling Abstract Short-term or Brief Counseling/Therapy and the current mental health system seem to be inexorably linked for at least the foreseeable future. This paper discusses the history, objectives, appropriate clientele, efficacy, and the other benefits, and short comings, of this therapeutic/counseling modality and its relevance to my present career direction, College Counseling. Cognitive-behavioral, Psychodynamic, and Gestalt applications of brief therapy/counseling methods will be addressed. For a working definiti ...
    Related: career counseling, college students, counseling, psychodynamic, crisis intervention
  • Cognitivebehavioral And Psychodynamic Models For College Counseling - 1,632 words
    ... um, college campuses appear to be a perfect setting for the use of brief therapy/counseling approaches. With the recent influx of older students returning to college, the diversity of presenting problems among the college client pool should be rather large. This provides the counselor with a rich and varied source of clients with which to hone his/her skills. Although my long term goals are to become a clinical psychologist and author, I have chosen College Counseling as an interim step in order to be able to work my way (financially) through a PhD/Psy.D program and gain valuable counseling experience along the way. My hope is to land a job as a college counselor at a university where I ...
    Related: college campuses, college students, counseling, counseling psychologist, psychodynamic, psychodynamic approach, psychodynamic therapy
  • Adlerian Psychotherapy: An Overview Of Theory And Practice - 1,190 words
    ... odify behavior. The goal of the therapy is to stimulate cognitive, affective and behavior change. Although the individual is not always fully aware of their specific goal, through analysis of birth order, repeated coping patterns and earliest memories, the psychotherapist infers the goal as a working hypothesis. The client approaches control of feelings and emotions. First, the client recognizes what kind of feeling he or she is having (angriness, sadness, frustration, etc). Once the client sees and knows the feeling; then he or she will try to imagine or think of something pleasant that had happened to him or her, replacing the bad feeling for a good one. By doing this, the client is in ...
    Related: overview, cognitive behavioral, behavior change, conflict resolution, adler
  • Alcoholism - 2,013 words
    ... times increased consumption of alcohol are cited in evidence. But these data invariably fail to take account of changes in availability or use of facilities, changes in admission or diagnostic policies, or changes in the source of beverages--for example, from unrecorded to recorded supplies. In the Soviet Union a change in the internal political situation with the death of Stalin resulted in a shift from official denial that any significant problem of alcoholism existed to an outcry that its prevalence was widespread and serious, though no statistics were provided. Treatment of alcoholism The various treatments of alcoholism may be classified as physiological, psychological, and social. ...
    Related: alcoholism, carbon dioxide, psychoactive drugs, alcoholics anonymous aa, therapy
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,281 words
    ... r parents and teachers no longer sustain her. She is unable to acknowledge her sexual desires and may regard her developing woman's body as an alien invasion. Her fear of adult femininity may also be a fear of becoming like her mother. According to this theory, fasting restores a sense of order to her life by allowing her to exert control over herself and others. She is proud of her ability to lose weight, and self-imposed rules about food are a substitute for genuine independence. Some students of anorexia believe that these girls starve themselves to suppress or control feelings of emotional emptiness. They struggle for perfection to prove that they need not depend on others to tell th ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, grolier multimedia encyclopedia, young woman
  • Anorexia Nervosa Is Refusal To Maintain Body Weight At Or Above A Minimally Normal Weight For Age And Height Intense Fear Of - 1,280 words
    ... ers no longer sustain her. She is unable to acknowledge her sexual desires and may regard her developing woman's body as an alien invasion. Her fear of adult femininity may also be a fear of becoming like her mother. According to this theory, fasting restores a sense of order to her life by allowing her to exert control over herself and others. She is proud of her ability to lose weight, and self-imposed rules about food are a substitute for genuine independence. Some students of anorexia believe that these girls starve themselves to suppress or control feelings of emotional emptiness. They struggle for perfection to prove that they need not depend on others to tell them who they are and ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, body weight, height, intense, lose weight, nervosa
  • Battered Womens Syndrome: A Survey Of Contemporary Theories In 1991, Governor William Weld Modified Parole Regulations And Pe - 1,755 words
    ... s theory, explaining help organizations are too overwhelmed and limited in their resources to be effective and therefore do not try as hard as they should to help victims. Whatever the case may be, the researchers argue that we can better understand the plight of the battered woman by asking did she seek help and what happened when she did, rather than why didn't she leave. Because the survivor theory of learned helplessness attributes the battered woman's plight to ineffective help sources and societal indifference, a logical solution would entail increased funding for programs in place and educating the public about the symptoms and consequences of domestic violence. There are battered ...
    Related: battered women, contemporary, governor, modified, parole, survey, weld
  • Behavior Therapies - 1,164 words
    ... at begins 'What if' is a catastrophic thought. Because your body and mind are intimately connected as one bodymind, you start the panic feedback loop of escalating anxiety when you think catastrophic thoughts. Just thinking those upsetting thoughts will cause you to have scary physical symptoms and panic attacks; then you really begin to believe you're going crazy . . . losing control . . . having a heart attack . . . making a fool of yourself . . .going to crash the car, whatever your worst fear is, and your symptoms escalate to the panic level. Cognitive psychotherapists are actively involved and focus on specific problems in the present. Cognitive therapists teach depressed people how ...
    Related: behavior therapy, heart attack, cognitive behavioral, sigmund freud, sigmund
  • Discuss Socialpsychological Explanations Given For Schizophrenia - 1,560 words
    Discuss Social/Psychological Explanations Given For Schizophrenia Page 255 Question 4 (a) and (b) DESCRIBE ANY ONE MENTAL DISORDER. DISCUSS SOCIAL/PSYCHOLOGICAL EXPLANATIONS GIVEN FOR THIS DISORDER. SCHIZOPHRENIA Schizophrenia is a serious psychotic disorder that is characterised by a loss of contact with reality. Kraepelin in 1902 originally called schizophrenia Dementia Praecox which is a senility of youth. He believed that the typical symptoms were due to a form of mental deterioration which began in adolescence. Symptoms are mainly disturbances of thought processes but also extend to disturbances of behaviour and emotion. There are two traditional symptom categories of schizophrenia. Acu ...
    Related: paranoid schizophrenia, psychological explanations, schizophrenia, medical research, general public
  • Dissociative Identity Disorder - 910 words
    Dissociative Identity Disorder Max Denis April 28, 2000 From the Diagnosis and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, dissociative identity disorder (DID) is recognized as the presence of two or more distinct identities or personality states that recurrently take control of the behavior. There is an inability to recall important personal information, the extent of which is too great to be explained by ordinary forgetfulness (1994). It is a kind of amnesia that repressed all the traumatic memories most of the time lived during childhood. The most frequent traumatisms that cause this disorder are the sexual abuse. The alter personalities are created to cope with intolerable abuse. They are ch ...
    Related: anxiety disorder, disorder, dissociative, dissociative identity, dissociative identity disorder, eating disorder, identity disorder
  • Erich Fromm - 672 words
    Erich Fromm . Erich Fromm who is a liberal social psychodynamic psychologist who was also a student of Freuds'. He believes that man is innately good and society is the thing that corrupts him. He also feels that the conscious mind dominates over the unconscious. Fromm says man is a social creature and he believes that mankind has social needs. He says life is a struggle and society makes our lives difficult. Fromm feels that the four needs of mans' social life are relatedness, frame of reference, identity, and transcendence. Relatedness is a basic need and it states that man needs to feel connected to humanity whether it be friends, family, or activities. It also states that man has to be i ...
    Related: erich, erich fromm, fromm, belief system, social life
  • Freudian Theory - 539 words
    Freudian Theory Sigmund Freud was a Viennese physician, whose psychoanalytic theory is the best-known psychodynamic approach today. He believed that behavior revealed unconscious internal forces. His work shows there are probably three parts that make up individual personality. All three parts are used for most behavioral decisions. This paper will go over: the id; the ego; the superego; as well as interactions of the id, ego, and superego. The Id The id is thought to be made up of natural biological instincts and urges. The ids instincts and urges lie in the unconscious. They are all self-serving, impulsive, and irrational. The id runs according to the pleasure principle (Dennis Coon pg. 46 ...
    Related: freudian, freudian theory, psychoanalytic theory, problem solving, psychodynamic approach
  • How Do Psychologists Attempt To Explain The Origins Of Prejudice - 1,390 words
    How Do Psychologists Attempt To Explain The Origins Of Prejudice? HOW DO PSYCHOLOGISTS ATTEMPT TO EXPLAIN THE ORIGINS OF PREJUDICE? DO THEY OFFER SOCIETY ANY HOPE THAT IT MAY BE REDUCED? BY JON SALECLEMENTS. Ethnocentrism is the tendency to assume that one's culture or way of life is superior to all others. Prejudice is a negative attitude toward an entire category of individuals. Discrimination is behaviour that excludes all members of a group from certain rights, opportunities or privileges. A range of international events have recently focused attention on the issue of prejudice; increasing ethno-nationalistic tensions in former Eastern block countries, racial conflict in the Middle East, ...
    Related: prejudice, psychologists, psychodynamic approach, individual differences, reduction
  • Human Nature - 1,424 words
    Human Nature Is there or is there not human nature? For Charles Darwin the answer is no. Darwin was the first to introduce the concept of evolution. He believed that humans evolved from the ape and not in the image of God. Darwin contradicted Aristotle's view that man has a purpose in life -to reason. For Darwin, man has no purpose. According to Darwin, man began as one of a few species on this planet, fighting for survival. Man was better equipped with certain traits that allowed him to pass through the filters of natural selection. Man's physical and intellectual traits allowed him to surpass all over species, thus becoming the greatest predator and severely diminishing the risk of man bec ...
    Related: human beings, human condition, human nature, human personality, human population
  • Lord Of The Flies - 1,891 words
    Lord Of The Flies The Lord of the Flies Symbolic significance and an In-depth look in the characters of this story Ryan Farrelly DUE Monday May 24, 1999 Mrs. Ferrelli English 8 Honors In viewing the aspects of the island society, the author William Golding's Lord of the Flies as a symbolic microcosm of society. He chooses to set the children alone in an unsupervised world, leaving them to learn the ways of the world in a natural setting first hand. Many different perspectives can also be considered. Golding's island of marooned youngsters becomes a microcosm. The island represents the individual human and the various characters represent the elements of the human psyche. In My readings I le ...
    Related: flies, lord of the flies, publishing group, decision making, rescue
  • Multiple Personality Disorder - 1,582 words
    Multiple Personality Disorder The most famous dissociative disorder is Multiple Personality Disorder, also known as Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID). It is estimated that one in one hundred people may suffer from Multiple Personality Disorder and other Dissociative Disorders. With correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment, people have the potential for complete recovery. Multiple Personality Disorder is a condition in which a person has more than one identity, each of which speaks, acts and writes in a very different way. Each personality seems to have its own memories, wishes, and (often conflicting) impulses The symptoms of an individual with Multiple Personality Disorder are 1.) lac ...
    Related: disorder, dissociative identity disorder, identity disorder, multiple, multiple personality disorder, personality, personality disorder
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder - 1,388 words
    ... ng and waning course. That is, symptoms may get somewhat better for months or even years, only to get worse again before returning to a lower level of severity. "Only about 5 to 10 percent of OCD sufferers enjoy a spontaneous remission in which all symptoms of OCD go away for good (Wayne K. Goodman, MD, University of Florida Brain Institute, 1999). Another 5 to 10 percent experience progressive deterioration in their symptoms." Stress can make OCD worse, but trying to eliminate all stress is unlikely to quell OCD. In fact, it is better for most people with OCD to keep busy. Idleness can be the breeding ground for increased obsessional thinking. Changes in the severity of OCD may be relat ...
    Related: compulsive, compulsive disorder, disorder, obsessive, obsessive compulsive disorder
  • Ordinary People Ordinary People By Judith Guest Is The Story Of A Dysfunctional Family - 1,301 words
    Ordinary People Ordinary People by Judith Guest is the story of a dysfunctional family who relate to one another through a series of extensive defense mechanisms, i.e. an unconscious process whereby reality is distorted to reduce or prevent anxiety. The book opens with seventeen year old Conrad, son of upper middle-class Beth and Calvin Jarrett, home after eight months in a psychiatric hospital, there because he had attempted suicide by slashing his wrists. His mother is a meticulously orderly person who, Jared, through projection, feels despises him. She does all the right things; attending to Jared's physical needs, keeping a spotless home, plays golf and bridge with other women in her soc ...
    Related: dysfunctional, dysfunctional family, guest, judith, ordinary, ordinary people
  • Personality Disorders - 537 words
    Personality Disorders There are many types of personality disorders and each one has different symptoms and characteristics. Some characteristics are shared by different disorders. People who rebel against their culture or society or who have outbursts and rages or have trouble with social skills, how they see themselves, how they cope with being around other people, and how they control their impulses are characteristics all shared by those who suffer from personality disorders. Many people who suffer from one disorder usually suffer more than one at a time but does not believe that they have a problem. It is said that, ⌠Symptoms stem from basic personality traits that develop over a ...
    Related: antisocial personality disorder, borderline personality disorder, disorders, personality, personality disorder, personality traits
  • Pieces Of The Puzzle: The Island As A Macrocosm Of Man - 1,931 words
    Pieces of the Puzzle: the Island as a Macrocosm of Man Subject: English - Golding: Lord of the Flies Pieces of the Puzzle: the Island as a Macrocosm of Man In viewing the various aspects of the island society in Golding's Lord of the Flies as a symbolic microcosm of society, a converse perspective must also be considered. Golding's island of marooned youngsters then becomes a macrocosm, wherein the island represents the individual human and the various characters and symbols the elements of the human psyche. As such, Golding's world of children's morals and actions then becomes a survey of the human condition, both individually and collectively. Almost textbook in their portrayal, the primar ...
    Related: british naval, health concerns, englewood cliffs, freud, maturity
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