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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: psyche

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  • A Comparison Of Freud And Fromm - 1,277 words
    A Comparison Of Freud And Fromm Sigmund Freud was born in Monrovia on May 6,1856. He entered the University of Vienna in 1873 at the age of 17. He finished his degree in 1881. Freud died in England in 1939. He was an active therapist, theorist and writer to the very end. ( Ewen 19-20) Erich Fromm was born four years after Freud in 1900 in Frankfurt, Germany. Unlike Freud, Fromm had no medical training in his background. He received his PHD from the University of Heidelberg and later studied at Berlin Psychoanalytic Institute. Erich Fromm died March 16, 1980 in Switzerland. (Ewen 187) While Freud and Fromm were contemporaries and shared some basic beliefs, their approach to most issues varied ...
    Related: comparison, erich fromm, freud, fromm, sigmund freud
  • A Jury Of Her Peers: A Character Analysis - 1,562 words
    A Jury Of Her Peers: A Character Analysis James McMasters English 112 October 17, 2000 A JURY OF HER PEERS - A CHARACTER ANALYSIS BY SUSAN GLASPELL As in the case of most, if not all, good allegorical stories, the primary impact of the tale is strongly influenced by the authors detailed characterization of the setting, as well as the characters feelings and passions. Certainly such is the case in Susan Glaspells story A Jury of Her Peers. Here we see a richness of characterization and setting that is elusive at first reading, but becomes clearer as the story evolves. In the final analysis, it becomes clear just who the jury is and the outcome of their collective verdict. It is by the use of ...
    Related: character analysis, jury, jury of her peers, human condition, breaking point
  • A Literary Critique Of C S Lewis - 1,048 words
    A Literary Critique of C. S. Lewis A Literary Critique of C. S. Lewis: The Case for Christianity, The World's Last Night and Problem with Pain I. Introduction II. Brief Biographical Information III. The Case for Christianity - Right and Wrong as a Clue to the Meaning of the Universe IV. The Problem with Pain - Divine Omnipotence V. The World's Last Night - The Efficacy of Prayer VI. Conclusion A Critique of C. S. Lewis "A Relativist said, 'The world does not exist, England does not exist, Oxford does not exist and I am confident that I do not Exist!' When Lewis was asked to reply, he stood up and said, 'How am I to talk to a man who's not there?'" - C. S. Lewis: A Biography Clive Staples Lew ...
    Related: c. s. lewis, critique, lewis, literature and language, world war i
  • Adrienne Rich - 1,721 words
    ... breadth, complexity and multidimensionality, in focusing on a fragment of a much larger statement when she states categorically that 'women's supposed complicated, pain-enduring, multipleasured physicality hardly seems a very hopeful basis on which to build resistance to their social subordination...' (14) Well no, it wouldn't be, if that were actually what Rich was proposing. I turn to a fragment from Integrity, from A Wild Patience to illustrate something of the complexity to be found in the poetry This extract is from 'Integrity', collected in A Wild Patience: Anger and tenderness: my selves. And now I can believe they breathe in me as angels, not polarities. Anger and tenderness: the ...
    Related: adrienne, adrienne rich, creative process, humane society, soar
  • Adrienne Rich - 1,720 words
    ... s Rich's breadth, complexity and multidimensionality, in focusing on a fragment of a much larger statement when she states categorically that 'women's supposed "complicated, pain-enduring, multipleasured physicality" hardly seems a very hopeful basis on which to build resistance to their social subordination...' (14) Well no, it wouldn't be, if that were actually what Rich was proposing. I turn to a fragment from Integrity, from A Wild Patience to illustrate something of the complexity to be found in the poetry This extract is from 'Integrity', collected in A Wild Patience: Anger and tenderness: my selves. And now I can believe they breathe in me as angels, not polarities. Anger and tend ...
    Related: adrienne, adrienne rich, social status, face value, complexity
  • Alfred Nobel His Prizes - 1,205 words
    Alfred Nobel & His Prizes In addressing hope, Alfred Nobel referred to it as nature's veil for hiding truth's nakedness2. Such a statement encompasses the struggle associated with Nobels lifework. Alfred Nobels existence spanned many realms of thought and being. He was a scientist, a writer, a philosopher and humanitarian, and ultimately a philanthropist. It was probably this myriad of influences and inspirations that injected him into the core of friction between science and society, between knowledge and application. This work will elucidate Nobels motivation for creating the Nobel Prize with the assertion that the prize is an instrument used to reconcile the incongruity between science an ...
    Related: alfred, alfred nobel, nobel, nobel prize, tsar nicholas
  • Alfred Nobel His Prizes - 1,163 words
    ... need for cutting labor costs. At this point Alfred and his father were tragically reminded of the peril of nitroglycerine due to the Heleneborg disaster in which Emil was killed as well as some others.4 After this point both Alfred and Immanuel were emotionally traumatized. Soon after Emils death Alfred focused on the manufacturing methods of nitroglycerine and eventually created conditions in which it was rendered harmless. In speaking of Alfred Nobels response to the death of his brother Evlanoff states: He blamed himself with bitterness He mourned that he had not been able to accomplish this sooner, so Emil need not have died. He could never forget the dreadful day of the Heleneborg ...
    Related: alfred, alfred nobel, nobel, nobel peace, nobel peace prize, nobel prize
  • Alice In Wonderland - 1,801 words
    Alice In Wonderland Finding the Child in Us All Lewis Carroll's classic Alice's Adventures in Wonderland has entertained not only children but adults for over one hundred years. The tale has become a treasure of philosophers, literary critics, psychoanalysts, and linguists. It also has attracted Carroll's fellow mathematicians and logicians. There appears to be something in Alice for everyone, and there are almost as many explanations of the work as there are commentators. It may be perhaps Carroll's fantastical style of writing that entertains the reader, rather than teaching them a lesson as was customary in his time. Heavy literary symbolism is difficult to trace through his works because ...
    Related: alice, alice in wonderland, wonderland, nineteenth century, young adult
  • Andy Warhols Impact On Art - 1,584 words
    ... ly he got out of the subways and started showing his work. Also like Basquait, there are certain things that remain prevalent in all of his work. For example, the radiant baby and barking dog are repeated and perfected. Keith Haring's style, like so many others from the Pop era, has been copied over and over. The most recent duplication was perhaps by the automobile conglomerate Honda for a commercial promoting one of their vehicles. Regardless, Keith Haring had a uniqueness and productivity that eventually became planted in the world psyche. Another artist that frequented the Factory was Kenny Scharf. Kenny Scharf was also briefly a graffiti artist. He, however, grew tired of this and m ...
    Related: andy, andy warhol, on the road, jack kerouac, cloth
  • Antisemitism In The United States - 392 words
    Anti-Semitism in the United States 'The more things change, the more they stay the same'. This clich has been used millions of times and never has it been more fitting than in this situation. The Holocaust was supposed to be a wake up call for the world, to let all nations know that racism and hatred must be abolished or at least contained in order for peace to exist. It seems that in this country, a nation founded on the principles of equality and freedom, the lessons of the Holocaust are being ignored. If you were to search the Internet and type in the phrase 'white supremacy' or 'Nazi', without a doubt you would find hundreds of organizations throughout the United States who still preach ...
    Related: antisemitism, hate crime, adolf hitler, white supremacy, semitic
  • Artificial Contraceptives - 1,475 words
    Artificial Contraceptives Artificial Contraceptive should be eliminated. This is my argument. Why you ask? Well, although my viewpoint sounds a little radical, I have come up with several reasons why natural is better. Funk and Wagnalls New Encyclopedia defines with birth control as any method used to prevent pregnancy from occurring. Methods available today range from permanent procedures such as surgical sterilization to temporary methods that must be with each act of intercourse. Sterilization, for example, has an effectiveness range from 99.5-99.9%. Yet, we must keep in mind that this operation can be rather expensive, costing up to $2,500. In addition, complications like infections or b ...
    Related: artificial, contraceptives, oral contraceptives, world health, birth control
  • Atomic - 2,303 words
    Atomic Bomb Then a tremendous flash of light cut across the sky . Mr. Tanimoto has a distinct recollection that it traveled from east to west, from the city toward the hills. It seemed like a sheet of sun. РJohn Hersey, from Hiroshima, pp.8 On August 6, 1945, the world changed forever. On that day the United States of America detonated an atomic bomb over the city of Hiroshima. Never before had mankind seen anything like. Here was something that was slightly bigger than an ordinary bomb, yet could cause infinitely more destruction. It could rip through walls and tear down houses like the devils wrecking ball. In Hiroshima it killed 100,000 people, most non-military civilians. Three day ...
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  • Battered Womens Syndrome: A Survey Of Contemporary Theories In 1991, Governor William Weld Modified Parole Regulations And Pe - 1,755 words
    ... s theory, explaining help organizations are too overwhelmed and limited in their resources to be effective and therefore do not try as hard as they should to help victims. Whatever the case may be, the researchers argue that we can better understand the plight of the battered woman by asking did she seek help and what happened when she did, rather than why didn't she leave. Because the survivor theory of learned helplessness attributes the battered woman's plight to ineffective help sources and societal indifference, a logical solution would entail increased funding for programs in place and educating the public about the symptoms and consequences of domestic violence. There are battered ...
    Related: battered women, contemporary, governor, modified, parole, survey, weld
  • Biased Judgement - 896 words
    Biased Judgement Our society interpret a person's outer appearance as a reflection of their inner- self. This is likely due to Heuristics. In the case of representativeness heuristic, a judgement regarding the person would be determined by the by the outward clues that the person reflected of themselves. One outward clue is the appearance of a person. If a person is neat in appearance and dressed in something like gothic-garb (black clothes and makeup). A person dressed in such a way could be judged as dark and extreme. This would be a fair assumption given that the person dressed in such a manner is in control of their appearance and desires to exude such an image. Arguments can be made to ...
    Related: judgement, information available, social behavior, terrorist acts, physiological
  • Brave New World By Huxley - 1,145 words
    Brave New World By Huxley Aldous Huxley wrote Brave New World out of fear of society's apparent lack of morals and corrupt behaviour during the roaring twenties. Huxley believed that the future was doomed to a non-individualistic, conformist society, a society void of the family unit, religion and human emotions. Throughout the novel, Huxley predicts many events for the future, most of which concentrate on a morally corrupt society. The most important of these predictions include: greater sexual freedom, over-population, brain-washing/sleep-teaching, and the use of mind altering drugs. Aldous Huxley's Brave New World warns of a possible future dystopia, based on social attitudes and medical ...
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  • Brew Of Life - 1,736 words
    Brew Of Life Anthony Burgess, Selective Individualist It is often said that life is full of choices and the choices you make is what makes you yourself. Society, however, has since the dawn of time tried to control the thoughts of individuals by forcing ideas upon them that destroys the person on a mental and emotional level while crushing their physical well-being. With the thoughts of a perfect world, people often forget that when you force a society to conform to standards you also kill the society's existence in the process, making it more machine that human. It takes a strong and educated person to realize these mistakes made by society and try to show others why it's wrong to try force ...
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  • Buddhism - 1,057 words
    Buddhism Dukkha is the first of the four noble truths of Buddhism. The word means suffering, but just to state suffering as the entirety of the first noble truth, is not enough because the expression of dukkha is the first truth that is needed for salvation. Moreover, dukkha is the conclusion of a logical chain of ideas that explains the life and death cycle of mankind. Before a person recognizes the truth of dukkha, he lives in a space of ignorance and with ignorance he seeks the fulfillment of his desires, yet with every demand met, he soon finds dissatisfaction. The longer a person lives the more apparent the truth of demise. With birth comes pain; with living comes pain and suffering. In ...
    Related: buddhism, life cycle, fold path, second noble truth, grief
  • Canterbury Tales - 1,005 words
    ... ee, nor of his wif." (55-56) and the miller pays heed to this warning, suppressing curiosity of "Goddes privetee" as regards the flood and trusting his wife so much as to leave her alone and independent while he travels on his business. This blind acceptance of 'Goddes' mysteries and his wife's deceit leads to his metaphoric and literal downfall when the tale comes to it's climax, as the miller falls from the roof, and again, literally and metaphorically waking up to find his wife having had sex with another man. The miller's wife Alison is another character that is represented using this same process of creating a stereotypical figure and then adding flaws and perversions. Alison is pre ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, the canterbury tales, geoffrey chaucer, the knight
  • Carl Gustav Jung - 1,811 words
    ... driving force to be a complete person! The self is the central archetype in the col lective unconscious, much as the sun us the center of the solar system. It unites the personality. When a person says he feels in harmony with himself and with the world, we can be sure that the self archetype is performing its work effectively. There are three ways how your psyche works together. One structure may compensate for the weakness of another structure, one component may oppose another component, and two or more structures may unite to form a synthesis. Compensation may be illustrated by the contrasting attitudes of extraversion and introversion. If extraversion is the dominant or superior att ...
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  • Carl Gustav Jung 18751961 Was A Son Of A Minister In Switzerland He Was Born On July 26, In The Small Village Of Kesswil On L - 1,390 words
    Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) was a son of a minister in Switzerland. He was born on July 26, in the small village of Kesswil on Lake Constance. He was named after his grandfather, a professor of medicine at the University of Basel. He was the oldest child and only surviving son of a Swiss Reform pastor. Two brothers died in infancy before Jung was born. Jung's mother was a neurotic and often fought with his father. Father was usually lonely and very irritable. When the child could not take his mother's depressions and his parents' fights, he sought refuge in the attic, where he played with a wooden mannequin. Carl was exposed to death early in life, since his father was a minister and attend ...
    Related: carl, carl gustav jung, gustav, gustav jung, jung, minister, switzerland
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