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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: prostitution

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  • Child Prostitution In Asia - 743 words
    Child Prostitution In Asia Children as Chattels Close your eyes. Imagine a young girl about six tied to a bed in a brothel and forced to service fifteen to thirty men in one night. Imagine this girl living in poverty, after all promises of selling herself told of riches. Now imagine this girl is your own. These are not pretty thoughts, but these actions are commonplace in Asia. In the February 1995 issue of World & I, Christopher P. Baker discusses his findings in the article, Kiddy Sex-Luring the Tourist for Love Beneath the Palms. In Asia more than half of the working prostitutes are under the age of 16, many of those are under the age of ten. Most people who hear the staggering statistics ...
    Related: asia, child prostitution, prostitution, young girl, different countries
  • Concept Of Prostitution - 1,181 words
    Concept Of Prostitution Introduction The concept of prostitution is one that causes a visceral revulsion in conventional Western morality - a symptom of which is how the many colloquial terms for a prostitute, such as 'whore', or 'harlot', are commonly used as denigratory pejoratives towards women. Although a persistent phenomenon throughout human history , it remains difficult to view prostitution in an objective light - various cultures have alternately tried to ban it on religious or moralistic grounds, or stigmatise it under a "don't-ask-don't-tell" sort of veneer which was a barely-tolerated but necessary evil of society. It is interesting to note that despite an increasingly secularise ...
    Related: prostitution, sanctity of marriage, john paul, human history, adverse
  • Concept Of Prostitution - 1,239 words
    ... ss to medical aid both due to fear of prosecution and fear of social stigma. Some of these proponents argue that the common perception of prostitution causes the poor conditions which opponents rail against as a reason to ban it. Furthermore, some liberal-minded people would go so far as to argue that even if these adverse conditions did exist, it is clear that these hazards are voluntarily undertaken by the woman who chooses to be a prostitute - and that we have no right to morally judge them, in the same way how we would not morally object to trapeze artists or firefighters for knowingly taking on such hazardous occupational risks. However, this argument is valid only if you believe an ...
    Related: prostitution, male female, john paul, last word, paying
  • Legal Prostitution Vs Illegal Prostitution - 1,026 words
    Legal Prostitution Vs. Illegal Prostitution Johnny Johnson Logic Legal Prostitution vs. Illegal Prostitution Johnny Johnson It is rather odd to think of how the oldest profession is being found as something of a harmful nature, which must be illegal. But legal prostitution is seen by a rather large number of individuals to have a negative effect on today's society. These are the people who are forcing women into illegal prostitution, which is far more destructive, due to many factors. In the following paragraphs, I am going to compare and contrast legal and illegal prostitution, in hope of sharing the possible benefits of legal prostitution. It is important I first discuss the negative effec ...
    Related: illegal, legal issues, legalized prostitution, prostitution, compare and contrast
  • Make Prostitution Legal - 1,238 words
    Make Prostitution Legal Prostitution Theory 101 by Yvonne Abraham with Sarah McNaught Few things have divided feminists as much as the sex industry. Theorists who agree on a vast swath of issues -- economic equality, affirmative action, even sexual liberation -- often find themselves bitterly opposed over pornography and prostitution. Most 19th-century feminists opposed prostitution and considered prostitutes to be victims of male exploitation. But just as the suffragette and temperance movements were bound together at the turn of the century, so too were feminist and contemporary moral objections to prostitution. Women, the argument went, were repositories of moral virtue, and prostitution ...
    Related: legal issues, prostitution, religious right, andrea dworkin, safer
  • Prostitution - 564 words
    Prostitution I. Introduction Prostitution, performance of sexual acts solely for the purpose of material gain. Persons prostitute themselves when they grant sexual favors to others in exchange for money, gifts, or other payment and in so doing use their bodies as commodities. In legal terms, the word prostitute refers only to those who engage overtly in such sexual-economic transactions, usually for a specified sum of money. Prostitutes may be of either sex, but throughout history the majority have been women, who have usually entered prostitution through coercion or under economic stress. II. Preindustrial Societies Prostitution was widespread in preindustrial societies. In the ancient Midd ...
    Related: prostitution, government officials, transmitted diseases, late middle ages, sexually
  • Prostitution Should Be Legal - 1,127 words
    Prostitution Should be Legal Referred to as the "oldest profession", prostitution ". . . has long been a problem which has provoked and disturbed Americans" (Kinsie 3). "Prostitution [is] the performance of sexual acts, solely for the purpose of material gain" (James [NA]). Prostitution remains, excepted and considered normal in some cultures. No gender specifics exist for prostitutes , but female prostitutes comprise the majority of prostitutes. A person male and married characterizing the majority of prostitutes clients, commonly referred to as a "John". Surprisingly, but true, US prostitutes work legally in some areas. "Prostitution is currently illegal in all 50 states" (Flowers 8), with ...
    Related: legal status, legalized prostitution, prostitution, aids hiv, microsoft encarta
  • Prostitution: Should It Be Legal - 1,758 words
    Prostitution: Should It Be Legal? Prostitution: Should it be legal? Prostitution is known as the oldest profession in the world, however, many states in the U.S. outlaw it. The textbook definition of prostitution is the act or practice of engaging in sexual acts for money (Prostitution, Macmillan 805). Nevada is the first state in the United States to legalize prostitution. Although the long-term effects of legalized prostitution are uncertain, the short-term effects have been economically beneficial. Prostitution should be legalized because not only could it financially benefit the country, but it could also reduce crime. There are many reasons why prostitution is illegal in 49 U.S. states ...
    Related: drug trafficking, health care, working environment, belonging, elimination
  • Prostitution: The Uncontrolalble Vise - 1,015 words
    Prostitution: The Uncontrolalble Vise There are women who search for love, and there are those that search for money. Today, the term woman simply denotes ones sex. It does not define her character, morals and values, or even her profession. However, this was not always the case. At the end of the nineteenth century and beginning of the twentieth century, during the Progressive Era, there was a drive for reform. Various social problems became targets for investigation and intervention: child labour, juvenile delinquency, corruption in city government and police departments, and prostitution. These things were newly discovered social problems; the only differences during this period were the ...
    Related: vise, social control, social problems, single women, reform
  • Prostitution: The Uncontrolalble Vise - 993 words
    ... e sexes. The Victorians and many of their descendants believed in a balanced society; each sex complimented the other thus if men had a strong sex drive, women, in order to maintain the balance, were weaker. Sexually active women were believed to be acting against their very nature. It is one of the reasons that being a prostitute has long been a crime in this country. Until recently, going to a prostitute has not; men who used the services of prostitutes were simply succumbing to their natural drives, where as the prostitutes were acting in an unnatural fashion. In the early part of the twentieth century the medical profession gave support to the idea that most prostitutes were feeble m ...
    Related: vise, york university, nineteenth century, hyde park, portrayal
  • The Futiity Of Prostitution Laws - 1,528 words
    The Futiity Of Prostitution Laws historically and which has many individuals reexamining the logistics of it. If prostitution is decriminalized it will become economically profitable and feasible for not only the prostitutes, but also western society as a whole. Without the 20th century western laws, which force prostitution underground, the profession of prostitution could become a clean and safe occupation. Prostitution laws are unconstitutional and deny the prostitutes what the American constitution allows them. Prostitution is an illegal act in Canada and large portions of the United States which, if legalized, would protect and benefit 20th century western society. If sanctioned, prosti ...
    Related: child prostitution, prostitution, san francisco, san jose, sexually
  • 1960s - 413 words
    1960S The 1960s were the age of "sex, drugs, and rock-n-roll." People had a new outlook to life. Women began wearing shorts, skirts, and clothing they normally did not wear. Almost anything was permissive. There was a full-scale sexual revolution. Decriminalization of homosexuality was prevalent and sex education was now allowed to be taught in schools. By taking the mystery out of sex (by learning about it), it will not be detrimental to society. Television shows also started including sex in hopes of lowering STDs and the birth rate. In 1963, birth control was developed and was known as "Katy bar the door." In the early 1960s, movies, books, and plays took on taboo subjects that intrigued ...
    Related: legalized prostitution, martin luther, sex education, premarital, television
  • A Farewell To Arms A Love Story - 1,085 words
    A Farewell to Arms - A Love Story A Farewell to Arms, by Ernest Hemingway, is a typical love story. A Romeo and his Juliet placed against the odds. In this novel, Romeo is Frederick Henry and Juliet is Catherine Barkley. Their love affair must survive the obstacles of World War I. The background of war-torn Italy adds to the tragedy of the love story. The war affects the emotions and values of each character. The love between Catherine and Frederick must outlast long separations, life-threatening war-time situations, and the uncertainty of each other's whereabouts or condition. This novel is a beautiful love story of two people who need each other in a period of upheaval. Frederick Henry is ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, farewell, farewell to arms, love affair, love story
  • A Steercar Named Desire Blanches Psychological Breakdown - 1,469 words
    A Steercar Named Desire - Blanche's Psychological Breakdown In Tennesse Williams' play, "A Streetcar Named Desire" the readers are introduced to a character named Blanche DuBois. In the plot, Blanche is Stella's younger sister who has come to visit Stella and her husband Stanley in New Orleans. After their first meeting Stanley develops a strong dislike for Blanche and everything associated with her. Among the things Stanley dislikes about Blanche are her "spoiled-girl" manners and her indirect and quizzical way of conversing. Stanley also believes that Blanche has conned him and his wife out of the family mansion. In his opinion, she is a good-for-nothing "leech" that has attached itself to ...
    Related: blanche dubois, breakdown, named desire, psychological, streetcar named, streetcar named desire
  • Abused Wives - 1,981 words
    Abused Wives "Every three minutes a woman is raped! Every fifteen seconds a woman is battered! Every six hours a woman is battered to death!" (Mckenzie, Cover) Research indicates that half the women in this country will experience some sort of violence, from a husband or boyfriend, in one form or another and more than one-third are battered repeatedly every year. (Wilson, pg. 8) Domestic violence is often dismissed as a problem that affects only a small group of women, however, as the facts show, the problem is not rare. The term "wife abuse" has many definitions: One of these is the use or threat of physical violence against a partner in a primary relationship. Physical violence is defined ...
    Related: wives, equal opportunity, psychological treatment, law enforcement, carolina
  • Adolf Hitler - 1,870 words
    Adolf Hitler For the past week I have been researching three men, Joseph Stalin, Mao, and Adolf Hitler for an answer to a question; who is the most evil? Which, means that I had to think about what exactly was evil for me. Now the dictionary they have a simple definition for it, which is: morally reprehensible, sinful, wicked. But there could be so many different meanings, because there are many different people in the world. So, these three men were judged on my definition of evil. Evil to me is someone who consciously knows what there doing but still doesnt care, someone who purposely tries to cause destruction on other people, one who possibly thinks that they are somewhat of a messiah, a ...
    Related: adolf, adolf hitler, hitler, vienna hitler, right to vote
  • Adult Entertainment And First Ammendment Rights - 1,283 words
    Adult Entertainment And First Ammendment Rights The essence of the American dream stems from freedom. Before this nation was even called the United States of America, religious separatists ventured across the Atlantic Ocean so that they would be free to practice a religion that was not controlled by the state. Today, we find ourselves in a constant battle with ethics, morals and values in the United States. Seeing that we are a nation that is culturally diverse myriad of cultures and religions has been mixed together and the final outcome is the society that we live in today. A serious conflict between the "morally correct" and the "ethically deficient" is the topic of sex and sexuality. Mos ...
    Related: adult, ammendment, constitutional rights, entertainment, first amendment
  • Aids - 1,443 words
    AIDS Gonzales 1 The Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was first discovered in 1981 as a unique and newly recognized infection of the body's immune system (Mellors 3). The name AIDS was formally know as GRIDS (Gay Related Immune Defiance Syndrome). The first case of AIDS was discovered in Los Angeles, where scientists from the CDC (Center for Disease Control) were called in on a half dozen cases. The CDC was convinced what they were seeing was a new strand of virus. None of the staff members had ever seen a strand of virus that could do so much destruction to the immune system like this one did. Many theories about this disease were in question. Many scientists believed it originated ...
    Related: aids, aids hiv, president clinton, health organization, sample
  • Aids In Detail - 2,125 words
    ... ne anonymous partner per year. Homosexual men have higher rates of sexually transmits diseases than heterosexual men and women because gay men tend to have larger numbers of different sexual partners, more often engage in furtive (anonymous) sexual activities, and more frequently have anal intercourse. PUZZLING SYMPTOMS Any theory of the new disease also had to account for a puzzling factor: the variety of symptoms seen in AIDS patients before they entered the final phase of complete susceptibility to opportunistic infections and cancers. Interviews with AIDS patients revealed many had been very sick for up to a year before they developed their first case of Pneumocystis pneumonia or sho ...
    Related: aids, life expectancy, men and women, hepatitis a, discovery
  • Aids Related Stigma Since The Appearance Of Aids In The Late Seventies And Early Eighties, The Disease Has Had Attached To It - 1,545 words
    AIDS Related Stigma Since the appearance of AIDS in the late seventies and early eighties, the disease has had attached to it a significant social stigma. This stigma has manifested itself in the form of discrimination, avoidance and fear of people living with AIDS (PLWAs). As a result, the social implications of the disease have been extended from those of other life threatening conditions to the point at which PLWAs are not only faced with a terminal illness but also social isolation and constant discrimination throughout society. Various explanations have been suggested as to the underlying causes of this stigmatization. Many studies point to the relationship the disease has with deviant ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, early years, seventies, stigma
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