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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: primate

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  • Primate Evolution - 1,720 words
    Primate Evolution Variation in the choices of food on a daily, seasonal, and yearly basis is one of the greatest differences between primate species. Primate diets have generally been divided into three main food categories-fruit, leaves and fauna (including insects, spiders, and bird's eggs for the most part). The different diets also are referred to as Frugivores, Folivores, and Insectivores (fruits, leaves and insects respectively). These gross dietary categories are correlated with aspects of primate activity patterns such as home range and group size. There are different problems that have to be overcome in order to obtain a balanced diet on a day-to-day basis. New leaves and mature lea ...
    Related: evolution, human evolution, primate, food supply, amino acids
  • Primate Species Profile - 774 words
    Primate Species Profile Primate Species Profile Red-shanked Douc Langurs What are their names? Scientific name: Pygathrix nemaeus English name: Red-shanked douc langurs How are they classified? Order: Primata Family: Cercopithecidae Did you know..... - That Douc langurs are leaf-eating monkeys with long intestines and very large stomachs to get nutrients out of leaves. Leaves are difficult to digest, so therefore, the langurs spend most of their time sleeping in order to properly digest them. They leaves they eat ferment inside them as part of their natural digestion, which releases bubbles of gas and causes them to burp! - Douc langurs have a specific playface in which the eyes are closed, ...
    Related: primate, profile, species, various types, vietnam war
  • Animal Experimentation - 1,936 words
    ... and adults. The only reason man is able to perform these vital operations is because dogs, who are the closest model to humans for this type of procedure at this time, were used for experimentation. By using the canines for experimentation, they have been able to perfect heart surgery in humans (Wil 65). Another benefit humans have had because of animal experimentation is the treatment of familial hypercholestolemia. It was discovered that Watanabe rabbits have a genetic disorder in which they have dangerously high cholesterol levels. A doctor found this problem on the rabbits' feet, which had yellow "pockets" full of liquid. He soon found out this disorder was similar to the ones in hu ...
    Related: animal experimentation, animal research, animal rights, animal testing, animal welfare, experimentation
  • Animal Intelligence - 963 words
    Animal Intelligence? Often those who study animal intelligence are searching for the human reflection in the animal world. They feel that by unraveling the workings of the animal brain, they might find clues to the mysterious minds of humans. And because of their closeness to humankind, they find monkeys and apes especially fascinating. A major component of intelligence lies in flexibility of mind and adaptability to situations. When things change, when they are not the way they were before, the intelligent animal notices and tries to adjust to the changed circumstances. The instinctual animal, such as a honeybee collecting for the hive, sometimes cannot adjust, so it continues in its old be ...
    Related: intelligence, different kinds, jane goodall, social life, jane
  • Anthropolgy - 1,276 words
    Anthropolgy Anthropology- the study of humankind everywhere, through time, seeks to produce reliable knowledge about people and their behavior, both about what makes them different and what they have in common. What They Do- Physical anth- study humans as biological organisms, tracing there evolutionary development of the human animal and looking at biological variations within the species, past and present (human evol, Primates, Human diversity. Cultural Anth- is concerned with human cultures, or the ways of life in societies. Culture bound- Theories about the world and reality based on the assumptions and values of ones own culture. Within the field of cultural anth are Archaeologist- Is t ...
    Related: blue eyes, common culture, human diversity, assign, volcanic
  • Biology And Human Evolution - 1,381 words
    Biology And Human Evolution Human Biology and Evolution Humans are Alive The earliest human life form can be traced back more than 3.5 billion years ago. Humans are said to be descendants of a single celled ancestor. Although they are different in size and shape all basic functions are alike. The more complex the organization of the cell became the more successful and developed it became. As these single celled organisms developed they became known as pre-humans. We share many characteristics with these pre-humans. Some of these characteristics include the masters of heredity DNA and RNA as well as proteins composed of amino acids, membranes or bound cells and lastly controlled cell division ...
    Related: biology, evolution, human biology, human brain, human evolution, human life
  • Brain Scans Show Pattern In Violent Behavior - 485 words
    Brain Scans Show Pattern In Violent Behavior Murderers and other people prone to violence have distinct brain patterns that can be scanned and that might be changed with drugs and other therapies, researchers said. Most people's brain can rein in overreaction to emotions such as fear or anger. But in pathologically violent people, this control system gets short-circuited. Several studies have shown this rewiring can be seen in images such as PET(positron emission tomography) scans. Impulsive,affective aggression may be the product of a failure of emotion regulation, University of Wisconsin-Madison psychologist Richard Davidson and colleagues wrote in their report, published in journal scienc ...
    Related: brain, violent behavior, research center, positron emission tomography, adaptive
  • Cloning Is Ethically And Morally Wrong - 882 words
    Cloning Is Ethically And Morally Wrong Cloning is Ethically and Morally Wrong The question shakes us all to our very souls. For humans to consider the cloning of one another forces them all to question the very concepts of right and wrong that make them all human. The cloning of any species, whether they be human or non-human, is ethically and morally wrong. Scientists and ethicists alike have debated the implications of human and non-human cloning extensively since 1997 when scientists at the Roslin Institute in Scotland produced Dolly. No direct conclusions have been drawn, but compelling arguments state that cloning of both human and non-human species results in harmful physical and psych ...
    Related: cloning, ethically, human cloning, morally, deductive logic
  • Colobus Monkey - 870 words
    Colobus Monkey In Africa there are many types of animals, one of them is the Colobus Monkey. There are different types of Colobus Monkeys: there is the white Colobus, the red Colobus, and the olive Colobus. The Colobus Monkey is a long tailed tree living primate. The Colobus Monkey can be found all over Africa. The Monkeys hair color varies from were the live. The Colobus Monkey is very unique. It comes in many types of color, is very active in social behavior and is very smart as shown in their lifestyle. The Colobus Monkey comes in many unique colors. The black and white Colobus is found across the equator of Africa. There are five species, among which the color varies from all black to a ...
    Related: monkey, west africa, different types, animal science, olive
  • Ebola Virus - 1,889 words
    Ebola Virus In the world today, there are many known deadly viruses, but few present as great a threat as Ebola, the virus that causes Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever. Key factors in understanding Ebola HF include: Its history, plan of attack, and the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. The Ebola virus can, and usually does cause a disease called Ebola hemorrhagic fever, which is a Viral hemorrhagic fever. According to the proceedings of the 4th National Symposium on Biosafety, the clinical definition for Viral hemorrhagic fever is as follows. "Viral hemorrhagic fever is an acute infection that begins with fever, myalgia, malaise and progresses to prostration. It shows evidence of vascular dysre ...
    Related: ebola, ebola virus, influenza virus, virus, health care
  • Ebola Virus - 1,094 words
    Ebola Virus Ebola virus, a member of the Filoviridae, burst from obscurity with spectacular outbreaks of severe, haemorrhagic fever. It was first associated with an outbreak of 318 cases and a case-fatality rate of 90% in Zaire and caused 150 deaths among 250 cases in Sudan. Smaller outbreaks continue to appear periodically, particularly in East, Central and southern Africa. In 1989, a haemorrhagic disease was recognized among cynomolgus macaques imported into the United States from the Philippines. Strains of Ebola virus were isolated from these monkeys. Serologic studies in the Philippines and elsewhere in Southeast Asia indicated that Ebola virus is a prevalent cause of infection among ma ...
    Related: ebola, ebola virus, virus, limited resources, life cycle
  • Evolution Of Man - 1,787 words
    Evolution Of Man The evolution of man is an area of study that will never fully be understood, however, evidence has been accumulated to allow us to paste together a picture of what happened in the beginning of time. It allows us to gather an idea of how man progressed to exist in the state in which we see him now. We can see that the evolution of man was directly influenced by his environment. Man's intellectual development directly effected the physical changes that we see. It is apparent through observation that the environmental changes also induced some of the physical changes that man underwent. These environmental changes and seemingly intellectual development slowly refined man's beh ...
    Related: evolution, human evolution, homo habilis, physical development, wind
  • For Almost Three Decades, Michael Crichton Has Written Novels That Appeal To His Readers Imagination And Take A Firm Hold Of - 1,909 words
    For almost three decades, Michael Crichton has written novels that appeal to his reader=s imagination and take a firm hold of their pocketbooks. Crichton=s writing stands out as much as his 6=9@ frame. He has become one of the most widely read and bought science fiction authors of the past three decades. From his first novel The Andromeda Strain, which he published while in medical school, to his most recent Airframe, Crichton has captivated his readers and left them craving more. What makes Crichton=s novels unique are their topics. Criction=s fiction novels have topics that range from little known historical events to indistinct scientific topics, such as cloning and primate communication. ...
    Related: appeal, crichton, firm, imagination, john michael, michael, michael crichton
  • Genetic Engineering - 1,177 words
    Genetic Engineering In todays world, people are learning a great deal in the rapidly growing and developing fields of science and technology. Almost Each day, an individual can see or hear about new discoveries and advances in these fields of study. One very common topic that has been in the news and social talk of all people recently is what us human beings will be able to do through the development of science and technology in the future. The most heated and controversial of these topics that I notice is in the field of genetic testing and engineering in humans. Many people have wondered about whether the manipulation of human cells is somehow contrary to the laws of nature or religion esp ...
    Related: engineering, genetic, genetic code, genetic engineering, genetic information, genetic research, genetic testing
  • Human Evolution - 1,029 words
    Human Evolution Role Of Tools In Human Evolution According to archeological and physical record, tool use has had an enormous effect in the transformation of proto humans into modern humans. What stimulated tool use was the proto humans intrest in new and easier ways to do things. With the introduction of tools, body morphology changed and reproductive fitness increased. Evolution did not happened over night. It took 4.5 million years for humans to get where they are today. Scientists have concluded that about 3.5 million years ago, there was the first proto human. A proto human resembles extinct hominid populations that had some but not all the features of a modern homo sapien. Such feature ...
    Related: evolution, human evolution, harcourt brace, space odyssey, harcourt
  • Human Sexuality - 1,062 words
    Human Sexuality Study of Human Sexual Behavior Human sexual behavior is just one of the many things anthropologist study when it comes to humans. Humans are highly complex and social beings. We often wonder why we do the things we do. Why do some people cheat, while others stay monogamous? Behavior is not an easy thing to study because it is subject to change and is continuously changing. There is no clear-cut reason for human behaviors, unlike mammals, humans can reject or override genetics. We are not under the control of our hormones or genes. We can resist our biology and it is for this reason that human behavior is so puzzling and complicated. Anthropologists solve this problem by looki ...
    Related: human behavior, human primates, human sexuality, sexuality, works cited
  • In My Short Life On This Planet I Have Come To Question Things That Many Take Upon Blind Faith We All Know That We Must Some - 1,162 words
    ... to define perfect (as it existed at that time). In the creationalistic point of view, a person might write it off as the act of God. It was his divine will that moved the planets together in such a way as to be able to support life. Or you could ask the more worldly scientist who would explain to you about the Law of Probability, the Theory of Relativity, and show you lengthy mathematical equations dealing with Quantum and Theoretical Physics. In the end, you would likely have a headache of immense size, but come away with perhaps a better understanding of how the order of events, and the laws which created, ordered and structured the planets to exist as they do. Many creationism fanatic ...
    Related: blind, human life, life span, planet, the bible
  • Jane Goodall - 634 words
    Jane Goodall Jane Goodall Jane Goodall was born in London, England in 1934. This British ethnologist who is still alive today has laid claim to many great accomplishments, traveled far distances and experienced many things no woman ever has. As a young girl Jane spent her days in England studying local birds and other creatures, reading books on zoology and dreaming of one day travelling to Africa. Jane's childish fancies were turned into reality when a close friend invited her to Kenya in 1957. Only a few months after her arrival 23 year old Jane met Dr. Louis Leakey. Even though Jane had no academic credentials, Leakey chose her to conduct a long-term study of the chimpanzees in Tasmania's ...
    Related: goodall, jane, jane goodall, role model, london england
  • Jane Goodall - 725 words
    Jane Goodall Jane Goodall May 19, 2001 Jane Goodall is one of the world's most admired women, acclaimed scientist, and conservationist (www.nationalgeographic.com). The work that she does is called ethology, which is the study of animal behavior. Such a successful woman has numerous admirable qualities. She has contributed greatly to society as well as to the animal kingdom. Her research paved the way for countless primate studies, and has changed the way many people view chimpanzees. Trying to narrow down only three admirable qualities about her is difficult, since she has so many. To me, her most admirable qualities are her patience and persistence to understand animals, her research invol ...
    Related: goodall, jane, jane goodall, young people, role model
  • Medical Testing On Animals - 839 words
    Medical Testing On Animals Animals have been used in medical research for centuries. In a recent count, it was determined that 8,815 animals were being used for research at MSU, 8,503 of them rodents - rats, mice, hamsters and gerbils. There were 18 dogs, three cats and a variety of goats, ferrets, pigeons and rabbits. The struggle against this tyranny is a struggle as important as any of the moral and social issues that have been fought over in recent years." Animal rights are an emotional issue-second only, perhaps, to the bitter abortion debate." For decades the value of animal research has been grossly overrated. Although researchers have depended on animal test data to achieve medical a ...
    Related: american medical, animal research, animal rights, medical association, medical research, medical science, testing
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