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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: populace

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  • A Lesson From Oliver - 5,155 words
    A Lesson From Oliver by David Jorgensen Like any other morning I was up at four, the day Oliver met with his violent death. At four in the morning the grass is wet. Now, it's still wet at 6 a.m. and even at seven, and these tend to be the hours of choice for most people wishing to appreciate the phenomenon of grass wetness. But it's a tragedy of economics that, when work starts at 5 a.m., one is not afforded the same time-options for grass appreciation as members of the sane world. Nor was this tragedy confined to my having to appreciate the wet grass while in a metabolic state more suited to hibernation. Four a.m. was my only chance to absorb all of northern Ontario's summer morning treasur ...
    Related: lesson, oliver, decision making, prime minister, initiated
  • Acts And Theophilus - 5,304 words
    Acts And Theophilus 1. Theophilus Lover of God, a Christian, probably a Roman, to whom Luke dedicated both his Gospel and the Acts of the Apostles. Nothing beyond this is known of him. From the fact that Luke applies to him the title "most excellent", the same title Paul uses in addressing Felix and Festus, it has been concluded that Theophilus was a person of rank, perhaps a Roman officer (Henneke). 2. John the Baptist John was Jesus cousin. He was to prepare a way for the messiah by baptizing people into repentance. He is only mentioned in Acts in passing. He had been murdered by King Herod years before. 3. Jesus He is the suffering servant, the messiah. He is God in flesh. He is the main ...
    Related: first century, lord jesus, kingdom of god, diana, persuade
  • Alternative Education - 612 words
    Alternative Education Alternative education caters to multifarious groups of students or unprofessional classified according to their needs and circumstances in life. Alternative education programs were designed because of pressures from concerned parents, teachers, students and government officials to ameliorate substandard education and dangerous environment in most public schools. Seeing its benefits, educators and educational institutions broaden the scope of this alternative to promote education and extend it to working adults to further their training and professionalism. Its main goal is to provide opportunities for millions of students, achievers or not, across the United States to m ...
    Related: alternative education, education programs, home schooling, safe schools, esteem
  • America: The Myth Of Equality - 1,313 words
    America: The Myth Of Equality America The Myth of Equality To many, the Unites States serves as the ideal model of democracy for the modern world. Yet, how truly worthy is America of this status? Although it has been said that, "Equality is as American as baseball, hot dogs, and apple pie," one must be extremely critical when analyzing such a statement. By taking a historical perspective to the question of how "equal" American equality actually is, it is simple to recognize how problematic the "Land of the Free" mentality can be. The early America's most prominent thinkers have been sensationalized and given credit for developing a free and equal system. However, one can recognize that their ...
    Related: equality, myth, social equality, social groups, john jay
  • American Revolution - 3,384 words
    American Revolution In the aftermath of the French and Indian War, Britain needed a new imperial design, but the situation in America was anything but favorable to change. Long accustomed to a large measure of independence, the colonies were demanding more, not less, freedom, particularly now that the French menace had been eliminated. To put a new system into effect, and to tighten control, Parliament had to contend with colonists trained in self-government and impatient with interference. One of the first things that British attempted was the organization of the interior. The conquest of Canada and of the Ohio Valley necessitated policies that would not alienate the French and Indian inhab ...
    Related: american, american affairs, american colonies, american population, american revolution, american revolutionary, american revolutionary war
  • Animal Farm Compared To The Russian Revolution - 761 words
    Animal Farm compared to the Russian Revolution Animal Farm by George Orwell Animal Farm compared to the Russian Revolution All of the characters in Animal farm have counterparts in real life. This book was based on the Russian Revolution, and all the important populace of the revolution are symbolized. Some of the animals represent individuals in the Russian Revolution, and some types of animals represent different types of Russian citizens. The book carries out much like the actual revolution. It starts out with hopes of an empire where all are equal and the unfair unjust leader is thrown out. Then it moves on to where some individuals begin to take more power than is rightfully theirs. At ...
    Related: animal farm, farm, russian, russian government, russian revolution
  • Animal Farm, The Significance Of Squealer - 1,156 words
    Animal Farm, the significance of Squealer Animal Farm, the significance of Squealer The novel Animal Farm, by George Orwell, is an allegory portraying the dangers of a totalitarian government. It seeks to show how a society where all live completely equal has not been, and cannot be achieved. Orwell, through the use of the character Squealer, shows how propaganda can affect members of a communist society in a negative way. By drawing parallels to events in communist Russia, Orwell's Animal Farm illustrates how propaganda was used to control the Soviet people by deceiving them, threatening them and keeping them ignorant in an attempt to maintain order. The story uses simple language to explai ...
    Related: animal farm, significance, squealer, communist russia, totalitarian government
  • Antisemitism Influence - 2,194 words
    ... od alone operating from within, and not of man working-or rather playing-from without. If these offences be taken away, worse will follow. For they are thus given over by the wrath of God to reprobation, that they may become incorrigible, as Ecclesiastes says, for every one who is incorrigible is rendered worse rather than better by correction. Farewell in the Lord; pardon my words, and pray the Lord for my sinning soul." "Martin Luther's to George Spalatin," from Luthers Correspondence and Other Contemporary, Letters, trans. by P. Smith (1913), Vol. 1, pp. 28-29. www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1514luther.html So we see he was absolutely determined that the Jews would and should convert to ...
    Related: antisemitism, lord jesus, german people, the bible, omitted
  • Armenian Genocide - 1,516 words
    Armenian Genocide Why was the Armenian Genocide Forgotten? GENOCIDE By definition genocide is the organized killing of a people for the express purpose of putting an end to their collective existence (Websters dictionary). As a rule, the organizing agent is the nation, the victim population is a domestic minority, and the end result is the near total death of a society. The Armenian genocide generally conforms to this simple definition. FORGOTTEN The Armenian genocide is a hidden, almost lost part of world history, pretty much eclipsed by the more publicized genocide of the twentieth century, the Holocaust. The question is why. I could take a poll of this room and I am willing to bet that 95 ...
    Related: armenian, armenian genocide, genocide, ottoman empire, political organizations
  • Benito Mussolini Was Born On July 29, 1883 In Predappio The - 886 words
    Benito Mussolini was born on July 29, 1883 in Predappio. The son of a blacksmith he was largely self-educated. He became a schoolteacher and a socialist journalist in northern Italy. In 1910 he married Rachele Guidi who bore his five children. Mussolini was jailed in 1911 for his opposition to Italy's war in Libya. Soon after his release in 1912 he became editor of the socialist newspaper in Milan, "Avanti!". When WWI began in 1914 Mussolini advocated Italy's entrance into the war on the allied side and was expelled from the socialist party. He then started his own newspaper in Milan, Il Popolo d'Italia (The People of Italy) which later became the origin of the Fascist Movement. In 1916 Muss ...
    Related: benito, benito mussolini, mussolini, problems caused, francisco franco
  • Businesses In Canada - 564 words
    Businesses in Canada Technological changes today, and in the near future, will be the greatest influence on Business as we know it. With the development of computers and robots, the requirements for many industries will fill up extremely quickly. By having machines to perform complex and monotonous operations by humans, industries will seek out their aid and most likely affect the emplyoment rate both ways. There is no question that many individuals will lose their jobs but at the same time new options will arise. An example would be the development of the Telstat Telecommunications satellite which opened the door for many unemployed citizens who possessed the key ingredient to hold down suc ...
    Related: canada, quality of life, natural resources, political system, market
  • Causes Of The Showa Restoration - 1,772 words
    ... liament, transformed this sense of a national crisis into a total shift in foreign policy. These "restorationists" in the military and in the public stepped up the crisis by convincing the nation that there were two enemies, the foreign powers and people within Japan.Footnote33 The militarists identified the Japanese "Bureaucratic Elite" and the expanding merchant class, the "Zaibutsu" as responsible for Japan's loss of grandeur. It was the Bureaucratic Elite who had capitulated to the Western powers in the Washington Conference and in subsequent agreements, that decreased the size of the Japanese military,Footnote34 and made Japan dependent of trade with other nations. The independence ...
    Related: meiji restoration, restoration, princeton university, japanese power, invasion
  • Causes Of The Showa Restoration - 1,772 words
    ... liament, transformed this sense of a national crisis into a total shift in foreign policy. These "restorationists" in the military and in the public stepped up the crisis by convincing the nation that there were two enemies, the foreign powers and people within Japan.Footnote33 The militarists identified the Japanese "Bureaucratic Elite" and the expanding merchant class, the "Zaibutsu" as responsible for Japan's loss of grandeur. It was the Bureaucratic Elite who had capitulated to the Western powers in the Washington Conference and in subsequent agreements, that decreased the size of the Japanese military,Footnote34 and made Japan dependent of trade with other nations. The independence ...
    Related: meiji restoration, restoration, power over, external factors, terrorists
  • Causes Of The Showa Restoration - 1,772 words
    ... parliament, transformed this sense of a national crisis into a total shift in foreign policy. These "restorationists" in the military and in the public stepped up the crisis by convincing the nation that there were two enemies, the foreign powers and people within Japan.Footnote33 The militarists identified the Japanese "Bureaucratic Elite" and the expanding merchant class, the "Zaibutsu" as responsible for Japan's loss of grandeur. It was the Bureaucratic Elite who had capitulated to the Western powers in the Washington Conference and in subsequent agreements, that decreased the size of the Japanese military,Footnote34 and made Japan dependent of trade with other nations. The independen ...
    Related: meiji restoration, restoration, russo-japanese war, parliamentary government, benedict
  • Causes Of The Showa Restoration - 1,772 words
    ... liament, transformed this sense of a national crisis into a total shift in foreign policy. These "restorationists" in the military and in the public stepped up the crisis by convincing the nation that there were two enemies, the foreign powers and people within Japan.Footnote33 The militarists identified the Japanese "Bureaucratic Elite" and the expanding merchant class, the "Zaibutsu" as responsible for Japan's loss of grandeur. It was the Bureaucratic Elite who had capitulated to the Western powers in the Washington Conference and in subsequent agreements, that decreased the size of the Japanese military,Footnote34 and made Japan dependent of trade with other nations. The independence ...
    Related: meiji restoration, restoration, ruth benedict, houghton mifflin, peter
  • China Economic Growth - 2,074 words
    China Economic Growth Two years after the death of Mao Zedong in 1976, it became apparent to many of China's leaders that economic reform was necessary. During his tenure as China's premier, Mao had encouraged social movements such as the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution, which had as their bases ideologies such as serving the people and maintaining the class struggle. By 1978 "Chinese leaders were searching for a solution to serious economic problems produced by Hua Guofeng, the man who had succeeded Mao Zedong as CCP leader after Mao's death" (Shirk 35). Hua had demonstrated a desire to continue the ideologically based movements of Mao. Unfortunately, these movements had left ...
    Related: china, chinese economic, economic crisis, economic development, economic growth, economic performance, economic reform
  • Christian - 1,749 words
    Christian Persecutions Kyle Sokul 453516 History 114, Dr. Kalinowsk Christian Persecutions Christianity first comes to the forefront of society in the first three centuries A.D. It does this though under extreme duress, as any person who claimed to be a Christian faced persecution at the hands of the Roman emperors. It wasnt until 313 AD, under the Emperor Constantine, that Christianity was officially recognized as an acceptable religion. Yet, despite the unfavorable conditions, the Christian faith survived and eventually came to play a prominent role in Roman society. This can be directly attributed to the courage showed by the martyrs of this age, and the pride that the rest of the Christi ...
    Related: christian, christian faith, christian writings, emperor constantine, oxford university press
  • Cicero, Was Truly A Man Of The State His Writings Also Show Us He Was Equally A Man Of Philosophical Temperament And Affluenc - 1,955 words
    Cicero, was truly a man of the state. His writings also show us he was equally a man of philosophical temperament and affluence. Yet at times these two forces within Cicero clash and contradict with the early stoic teachings. Cicero gradually adopted the stoic lifestyle but not altogether entirely, and this is somewhat due to the fact of what it was like to be a roman of the time. The morals of everyday Rome conflicted with some of the stoic ideals that were set by early stoicism. Thus, Cicero changed the face of stoicism by romanizing it; redefining stoicism into the middle phase. Of Cicero it can be said he possessed a bias towards roman life and doctrine. For Cicero every answer lay withi ...
    Related: ideal state, philosophical, temperament, ideal society, roman society
  • Cicero, Was Truly A Man Of The State His Writings Also Show Us He Was Equally A Man Of Philosophical Temperament And Affluenc - 1,956 words
    ... nd the factors too deeply but rather he relied to mush on the roman historic path as a blueprint. Cicero offered no real comprehensive logic behind his pattern of possible outcomes. Early roman history (tradition) tells of a series of seven kings, and the last, Lucius Tarquinius Superbus, was a tyrannical rex. In the first part of Cicero's diagram a monarch is in place, which can only be followed by a tyrant. After Lucius Tarquinius Superbus overthrow the senate and patricians played a decisive role. The rex's position was abolished and two consuls were elected annual ridding Rome of monarchical and tyrannical rule. This brought Rome into the age of a republic, shortly after the senate g ...
    Related: philosophical, roman state, temperament, roman world, political philosophy
  • Clash Of Civilizations - 2,240 words
    ... ed to the Western impact in one or more of three ways: rejecting both modernization and Westernization, embracing both, or embracing modernization and rejecting Westernization. In the twentieth century improvements in transportation and communication and global interdependence increased tremendously the costs of exclusion. Except for small, isolated, rural, communities willing to exist at a subsistence level, the total rejection of modernization as well as Westernization is hardly possible in a world becoming overwhelmingly modern and highly interconnected. Kemalism, which is the embrace of both concepts, is based on the assumptions that modernization is desirable and necessary, that the ...
    Related: clash, western civilization, latin america, progressive era, substantial
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