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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: pope john paul ii

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  • Abortion - 1,294 words
    Abortion There are few issues that can cause as many heated and sometimes, irrational, debates than that of abortion. The issue strikes at the very heart of an individual's religious and philosophical beliefs. Does a woman have the right to terminate a pregnancy? Is it moral to do so in any circumstance? Is a fetus a living human being? The debate has raged for nearly thirty years and there does not seem to be any end to the controversy that often results in violence. Irrational individuals who have committed murder want to make their beliefs heard and followed. In response to the question, some people have resulted to using qualifiers: no, abortion is not moral except if the pregnancy is th ...
    Related: abortion, morality of abortion, population growth, child abuse, candy
  • Abortion Prohibition - 1,317 words
    Abortion Prohibition One of the most ethical controversial issues been debated now in United States is whether late- term abortion should be banned or not. Most people argued that it is proper to ban late-term abortion. They believe that it is un-ethical and a murder of an unborn child not a right of freedom of choice. It is an immoral act and violates the social and religious norms. On the other hand some people argued that late-term abortion should not be banned because it is necessary to terminate a fetus when the life of the woman is in danger as a result of complicated pregnancy; or when pregnancy result from incest or rape and the woman may be late in finding out that she is pregnant. ...
    Related: abortion, prohibition, supreme court, civil liberty, catheter
  • Abortion Prolife View - 1,071 words
    Abortion - Prolife View Abortion, the termination of pregnancy before the fetus is capable of independent life, can either be spontaneous or induced. It is called the knowing destruction of the life of an unborn child. (Mass General Laws Chapter 112 Section 12K) When abortion occurs spontaneously, it is called a miscarriage. However, when the loss of a fetus is caused intentionally, it is regarded as a moral issue. Abortion destroys the lives of helpless, innocent children and is illegal in many countries. An estimate of 1.2 million are performed each year. In retrospect, an estimate 38,010,378 innocent children were aborted since 1973 when the process was legalized. Abortion is a simple and ...
    Related: abortion, partial birth abortion, partial-birth abortion, john paul, cervical cancer
  • Abortion, The Pope And Peter Singer - 1,563 words
    Abortion, The Pope And Peter Singer Abortion is one of the most controversial issues today. It has become a question of not only ethics, but morals. In the 1973 case of Roe v Wade the Supreme Court ruled that a woman has the right to terminate a pregnancy by abortion within the first six months of the pregnancy. However, conservative Presidents have changed the legislation enough to allow states to restrict abortion in various ways (Practical Ethics, Peter Singer). In the following paper, I will summarize the views on abortion of Pope John Paul II and philosopher, Peter Singer. These two men have very conflicting opinions about abortion. Pope John Paul IIs Argument: This argument is very ada ...
    Related: peter, peter singer, pope, pope john, pope john paul, pope john paul ii, singer
  • Capital Punishment - 1,639 words
    Capital Punishment Capital Punishment: An Eye For An Eye? In the United States, the use of the death penalty continues to be a controversial issue. Every election year, politicians, wishing to appeal to the moral sentiments of voters, routinely compete with each other as to who will be toughest in extending the death penalty to those persons who have been convicted of first-degree murder. Both proponents and opponents of capital punishment present compelling arguments to support their claims. Often their arguments are made on different interpretations of what is moral in a just society. In this essay, I intend to present major arguments of those who support the death penalty and those who ar ...
    Related: capital punishment, punishment, right to life, international court, span
  • Catholic Church And Contraception - 1,451 words
    Catholic Church And Contraception The issue of contraception has been an extremely controversial and debated one in the Catholic Church. The Catholic religion declares that the three requirements for healthy sexual expression include a mutual physical drive for pleasure, intimacy and committed love between the couple, and the openness to procreation and parenting children. This last aspect is the subject of much disagreement between people both inside and outside the church community. The authoritative voice of the church, the Magisterium, holds that artificial contraception is a sin and only accepts the form of contraception called Natural Family Planning. This method involves avoiding sexu ...
    Related: catholic, catholic church, catholic religion, contraception, emergency contraception
  • Catholic Church And Contraception - 1,414 words
    ... cal states that artificial contraception is contradictory to this language. Pope John Paul II, in detail, says in his document about the difference between artificial contraception and Natural Family Planning, "It is a difference which is much wider and deeper than is usually thought, one which involves in the final analysis two irreconcilable concepts of the human person and of human sexuality. The choice of the natural rhythms involves accepting the cycle of the person.. which means to recognize both the spiritual and corporal character of conjugal communion and to live personal love with its requirement of fidelity." (Pope John Paul II #32). Most recently, Veritatis Splendor written b ...
    Related: catholic, catholic church, catholic tradition, contraception, national catholic reporter
  • Christifidelis Laici - 347 words
    Christifidelis Laici Christifidelis Laici Christifidelis Laici was written with the intention to bring together experience with theory. This was in order for concrete ways in which the laity according to the Vatican II could be implemented into an authentic living experience. Resulting from Vatican II the lay participation blossomed in the Church's mission. Through faith and baptism lay people are engrafted to Christ and that the laity thus have a positive understanding of their vocation and mission. Through baptism one becomes the child of Christ and members of Christ's body. Because of this lay people share in Christ's mission as a priest, prophet, and king in ways appropriate to them as l ...
    Related: good samaritan, good news, pope john paul ii, elderly, tuesday
  • Concept Of Prostitution - 1,181 words
    Concept Of Prostitution Introduction The concept of prostitution is one that causes a visceral revulsion in conventional Western morality - a symptom of which is how the many colloquial terms for a prostitute, such as 'whore', or 'harlot', are commonly used as denigratory pejoratives towards women. Although a persistent phenomenon throughout human history , it remains difficult to view prostitution in an objective light - various cultures have alternately tried to ban it on religious or moralistic grounds, or stigmatise it under a "don't-ask-don't-tell" sort of veneer which was a barely-tolerated but necessary evil of society. It is interesting to note that despite an increasingly secularise ...
    Related: prostitution, sanctity of marriage, john paul, human history, adverse
  • Concept Of Prostitution - 1,239 words
    ... ss to medical aid both due to fear of prosecution and fear of social stigma. Some of these proponents argue that the common perception of prostitution causes the poor conditions which opponents rail against as a reason to ban it. Furthermore, some liberal-minded people would go so far as to argue that even if these adverse conditions did exist, it is clear that these hazards are voluntarily undertaken by the woman who chooses to be a prostitute - and that we have no right to morally judge them, in the same way how we would not morally object to trapeze artists or firefighters for knowingly taking on such hazardous occupational risks. However, this argument is valid only if you believe an ...
    Related: prostitution, male female, john paul, last word, paying
  • Crime Is Inevitably One Of The Biggest Problems That Faces The Modern World Today It Can Be Found All Over The World, Whether - 1,334 words
    Crime is inevitably one of the biggest problems that faces the modern world today. It can be found all over the world, whether in large cities or small villages. Over time, society has tried to find ways to deal with crime. Such methods include community service, paying a fine serving some time in prison, and in the case of more serious crimes, the death penalty. This is the case in some states in the U.S. where persons have been executed for aggravated assault, rape, kidnapping, armed robbery, sabotage and espionage. Advocates for capital punishment feel that it deters criminals from committing crime and that if the criminal is not executed, the risk later extends to the community as such p ...
    Related: crime, modern world, over time, violent crime, world today
  • Crime Is Inevitably One Of The Biggest Problems That Faces The Modern World Today It Can Be Found All Over The World, Whether - 1,324 words
    ... ze that ...a good end, no matter how compelling, never justifies an evil means. Never, in other words may [one fundamental human good] be intentionally sacrificed... for the sake of another (Campbell,17). Only in the first case can the principle of double effect be invoked. Capital punishment is similar to the second case. It violates the principle in that through evil means, the execution of a human being, can a good end, the protection of the common good, be obtained. Another example how the principle of double effect works can be shown through a person who has a deadly tumor in his leg which must be removed, but may cause a problem with mobility. The procedure, there for, has two effe ...
    Related: crime, modern society, modern world, violent crime, world today
  • Death Penalty - 1,189 words
    ... stressing and may take several minutes. The courts step in. By 1967 legislation efforts were under way to persuade the U.S Supreme Court that the death penalty violated cruel and unusual punishment prohibitions of the eight amendment. The court responded by staying execution by the court order pending outcome of the suits. In June 1992 the court decided that the erratic selection of offenders singled out for the death penalty resulted from lack of standards. On July 1972 the Supreme Court again ruled on the death penalty and issued 5 opinions. One decision stated that capital punishment for the crime of murder was not cruel or unusual punishment. They also ruled that to be constitutional ...
    Related: death penalty, death row, penalty, capital punishment, north american
  • Death Penalty - 1,462 words
    Death Penalty Oklahoma executed Sean Sellers, who was sixteen when he murdered his parents, February 1999. This marked the first time in forty years that such a young offender was executed in the United States. Criticism and calls for clemency came from around the world, including Archbishop Desmond Tutu, the American Bar Association, and Amnesty International. These events that have occurred in our country are tearing it apart at its seams: the death penalty and the divided America it has created. Long before the first prisons were built there was the penalty of death. The Greeks and Hebrews developed a specific ritual for execution by stoning. Death by a thousand cuts was popular in China ...
    Related: death penalty, death row, penalty, nations high commissioner, early america
  • Death Penalty Herrera Vs Collins - 619 words
    Death Penalty - Herrera vs Collins The Supreme Court addressed the constitutionality of executing someone who claimed actual innocence in Herrera v. Collins (506 U.S. 390 (1993)). Although the Court left open the possibility that the Constitution bars the execution of someone who conclusively demonstrates that he or she is actually innocent, the Court noted that such cases would be very rare. The Court held that, in the absence of other constitutional violations, new evidence of innocence is no reason for federal courts to order a new trial. The Court also held that an innocent inmate could seek to prevent his execution through the clemency process, which, historically, has been "the 'fail s ...
    Related: death penalty, death row, penalty, chicago illinois, catholic church
  • Domestic Violence - 1,289 words
    Domestic Violence People who are close to one another need to trust each other. We should trust our parents not to hurt us, and to give us what we need to grow. Boys and girls should trust each other, as well as men and women. When someone is abused, the trust is broken. Domestic violence is the use of physical force within a home in any form of abuse. Abuse can be a whole range of physical behaviour, slapping, hitting, beating, or using weapons to hurt someone. It includes verbal and emotional abuse, where someone is constantly insulted and made to feel sad and worthless. It can also include rape and sexual abuse. Sexual abuse is when someone forces another to have sexual intercourse or do ...
    Related: domestic violence, family violence, violence, pope john paul ii, property rights
  • Drug Testing - 1,601 words
    Drug Testing Drug testing is a laboratory procedure that looks for evidence of drug consumption by analyzing urine, blood, and hair samples. If tested, you must provide a sample in front of an observer to make sure that it is not tampered with. Samples are then sent to a laboratory for analysis, after which the employer is notified of the results (Wodell 1). Exactly who should be subject to the new trend of mandatory drug tests, is the big question being raised among businesses, schools, athletes and federal government employees. Businesses feel that random drug testing of their employees will create higher productivity, save on health care costs, improve employee turnover, prevent less acci ...
    Related: drug and alcohol abuse, drug testing, illicit drug, testing, pope john paul
  • Edith Stein - 730 words
    Edith Stein Edith Stein Edith Stein was born on October 12, 1891 , Yom Kippur, the Jewish day of Atonement in Breslau Germany now Wroclaw Poland. She was born into an Orthodox Jewish family and was the youngest of 11 children. When she was not yet 2 years of age, her father suddenly died. This left Edith's mother to raise the seven remaining children since 4 had died in childhood and manage the family business. She considered her mother an example of the woman in Proverbs 31, who rises early to care for her family and trade in the marketplace. At around the age of 13 she no longer practiced her Jewish faith and became an atheist although she admired her mother's attitude of total openness to ...
    Related: edith, stein, pope john paul ii, pope john, dominican
  • End Of Life And Christian Love - 1,041 words
    ... able aim. On the basis of this aim vs. result framework, questions concerning the withdrawal of food and drink are also easily addressed. Problems arise in some of the justification used for performing this action. It is not possible to, when withdrawing food from the permanently unconscious person, properly claim that our intention is to cease useless treatment for a dying patient. These patients are not dying, and we cease no treatment for a dying patient. These patients are not dying, and we cease no treatment aimed at disease; rather, we withdraw the nourishment that sustains all human beings whether healthy or ill, and we do so when the only result of our action can be death. At wha ...
    Related: christian, human life, dying patient, john paul, withdrawal
  • Eugenics - 2,066 words
    ... orn or even fertilized. In this way, a doctor can see that a child will have a genetic disorder and can prepare the parents for the child's birth. The general term for these practices is genetic counseling. This is an umbrella term which includes in vitro fertilization, artificial insemination, amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling. In vitro fertilization and artificial insemination are techniques that were originally created in order to overcome infertility among couples. In vitro fertilization involves fertilizing an egg outside a woman's body and later inserting it into the uterus. Artificial insemination involves placing sperm inside a female in order to fertilize an egg. Due t ...
    Related: eugenics, therapeutic intervention, social costs, vitro fertilization, makeup
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