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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: poor countries

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  • Absolute Poverty - 1,934 words
    Absolute Poverty Peter Singers characterization of absolute poverty is defined by using the criteria given by World Bank President, Robert McNamara. McNamara states that absolute poverty is, a condition of life so characterized by malnutrition, illiteracy, disease, squalid surroundings, high infant mortality and low life expectancy as to beneath any reasonable definition of human decency. This form of poverty affects human life on all levels of existence. A comparison is given between the relative poverty of industrialized nations versus the absolute poverty of developing nations. Relative poverty means that some citizens are poor, relative to the wealth enjoyed by their neighbors. Absolute ...
    Related: absolute, absolute poverty, poverty, relative poverty, save lives
  • Causes Of Poverty In The Developing World - 707 words
    Causes Of Poverty In The Developing World The causes of poverty in the developing world Wars Many LDC's have been badly affected by wars. There have been many civil wars in Africa, caused by European empire-building in the nineteenth century. Several African races were joined into one country, but half a race was left in another country. These countries were still artificial countries after they achieved independence. One race was often badly treated by the ruling race, which resulted in civil war. This also happened in Europe since the various parts of Yugoslavia were given independence. LDC's also suffer from wars between different countries, such as: Ethiopia and Somalia, Afghanistan and ...
    Related: developed world, developing world, modern world, poverty, second world, world leaders, world market
  • Child Labour And Society - 1,659 words
    Child Labour And Society A concern of child labour exists from poverty. We have to understand as why children go to work. If parents don't send their children to work I am sure factories will not be able to consume them. Why poor parents feel children as their assets who will earn money for their home? Are they forced by their parents to go to work? If yes why? Nearly 30% of population in poor countries are poorest of poor who are not even able to earn enough for one day food with big family have to largely depend on children to earn and feed. Parents of these children are mainly illiterate or semi literate are unable to find jobs, which can provide enough salary. Dream of education to child ...
    Related: child labour, labour, young child, urban areas, social security
  • Corporate Downsizing - 1,268 words
    Corporate Downsizing Corporate Downsizing Organizations in every segment of business, industry, government, and education are downsizing. Downsizing is and has been a controversial phenomenon in the last few years. The controversy that surrounds downsizing may be better described as a debate in organizational theory about whether change is adaptive or disruptive. The issues which establish the outcome of the controversy include why the downsizing is taking affect, how it is implemented, and what steps are taken to enhance its effects on organizational performance. The reasons for corporate downsizing are presented in many forms. Some companies downsize due to technological changes such as au ...
    Related: corporate, corporate environment, downsizing, organizational theory, organizational performance
  • Global Warming - 1,345 words
    Global Warming The humanity is currently facing one its biggest problem ever. Indeed, the Earth is warming and consequences might be devastating for the future generations. There is a general agreement among scientists that Earth's climate is being affected by industrial society. Industry affects global climate by releasing greenhouse gases (GHGs). The most significant GHG is carbon dioxide (CO2). While some GHGs occur naturally, others are released in the atmosphere by certain human activities such as the burning of fossil fuels, deforestation activities and some agricultural practices. These activities affect climate by increasing the so-called 'greenhouse effect'. GHGs concentrate in the ...
    Related: global climate, global warming, warming, more important, new zealand
  • Globalization And Its Effect On Poverty - 1,843 words
    Globalization And Its Effect On Poverty Globalization and Its Effect on Poverty Globalization has helped raise the standard of living for many people worldwide. It has also, however, driven many deeper into poverty. Small businesses and third world countries are not capable of updating their technology as often as their larger, wealthier counterparts. Unable to compete with multinational firms and wealthy nations, small businesses and third world countries and forced to do business locally, never growing and reaching their full potential. Technological advances are made daily throughout the world. However, it is expensive to rapidly make and transport these advances globally. This high produ ...
    Related: globalization, poverty, alan greenspan, economic integration, transportation
  • History Of Middle America - 1,469 words
    ... d assembly from all of the provinces gathered in Guatemala and declared its independence from Spain under the name United Provinces of Central America. In 1824 it adopted the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Central America, a document similar to the Spanish Constitution of 1812, providing for a federation of Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Costa Rica. Chiapas decided to stay with Mexico, and Panama had become part of the Republic of Columbia in 1821. In 1824 the constitution provided a single-house legislature and reserved considerable autonomy to the states, yet it offered an adequate framework for a union. Different provincial ideologies began to show themselve ...
    Related: america, central america, history, middle america, less developed countries
  • How Overpopulation Causes Social Problems - 1,470 words
    How Overpopulation Causes Social Problems How Overpopulation Causes Social Problems Introduction The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how overpopulation causes social problems. To do so you must take many things into consideration, such as different views of racial problems and conflicting definitions of a social problem. Social problems can be defined in many different ways. They effect everyone and some of us encounter problems everyday as a result of our race, religion, gender, or low income. Others experience problems from technological change or declining neighborhoods, others are affected directly by crime and violence in their own neighborhood, and sometimes definitions of soci ...
    Related: overpopulation, social groups, social order, social problems, social structures
  • How Overpopulation Causes Social Problems - 1,496 words
    ... the father of the child will be there to love and support both of them. Statistics show that most of them leave the mother to support the child on their own with no financial support whatsoever. America's inner cities -Vs- Third World Countries At first, it might appear impossible to compare conditions in America's inner cities with those that characterize overpopulated countries of the Third World. In both instances such factors as poverty, overcrowding and lack of educational and employment opportunities promote negative social patterns. In both the United States and Third World countries poor young males in particular are frequently forced to choose between a life of crime and compet ...
    Related: overpopulation, social issues, social problems, foster child, family planning
  • Information Technology And Expansion Of The European International System: - 1,421 words
    ... mple of such a development is an experiment at Sandia National Laboratories: "The co-operative monitoring center there seeks to make available in today's trouble-spots monitoring technologies and procedures acquired in the Cold War." The program seeks to develop IT solutions - procedures, instruments, and systems - so that adversaries may watch each other's maneuvers. Already showing some success, the center has brought Israelis and Arabs together to play simulated monitoring 'peace games' on their computer screens. The theory behind this application of IT is that if enemies are constantly watching each other with the same level of IT, the possibility of the surprise attack and even mere ...
    Related: european countries, expansion, information age, information overload, information revolution, information sharing, information technology
  • Keeping The Rabble In Line - 3,544 words
    Keeping The Rabble In Line Keeping the Rabble in Line Copyright 1994 by Noam Chomsky and David Barsamian Introduction | Next section | Contents | Archive | ZNet The World Bank, GATT and Free Trade April 20, 1992 DB: In 1944 at the Bretton Woods conference in New Hampshire the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) were both created. What function do these two major financial entities play? Their early role was in helping to carry through the reconstruction of the state capitalist industrial societies that had been wrecked by the Second World War. After that they shifted to what is called development, which is often a form of controlled underdevelopment in the Third World, whic ...
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  • Keeping The Rabble In Line - 3,628 words
    ... in the world. Also, it's dependent, unlike the United States -- which has plenty of internal resources and enough military power to control other sources of raw materials -- on trade for resources and raw materials as well. Also, the Japanese, when you look at the numbers, look very rich. But if you look at the way people live, they don't look very rich. People are crammed into tiny apartments. They live a highly coerced and submissive existence. If you develop any reasonable quality of life standards, Japan would not rank very high by many measures, although it ranks quite high in others, like health, for example. So it's a mixed story. It think there are serious weaknesses in that eco ...
    Related: prison population, current recession, organized labor, graduate, chicago
  • Lifeboar Ethics - 1,036 words
    Lifeboar Ethics Garrett Hardins argument for the preservation of well-to-do societies is embodied by his extended metaphor of each society as a lifeboat with its members the lifeboats occupants. His presentation of this metaphor is key in his assertions that the creation of an international food bank, efforts to improve agriculture in foreign nations (the Green Revolution), and lax immigration laws will all result in universal tragedy. Hardins initial complaint is against humanitarian efforts to establish an international food bank, to which rich nations will contribute and from which poor nations will draw. Theoretically, accidents (famine, crop failure, etc.) should teach nations to plan a ...
    Related: ethics, world today, poor countries, green revolution, guilt
  • Middle East Life - 1,093 words
    Middle East Life After reading "God Dies By The Nile" by Nawal El Saadawi one can begin to realize how much different life in the Middle East is in comparison to areas such as China and India which we have studied. The term Middle East refers to South Western Asia and North Eastern Africa The Middle east has many very interesting features and aspects about it such as the way there economy is organized, the type of religion that they practice, the various geographical aspects of the land, and the way that society is in general. The economy of the Middle East is somewhat similar to the economy of India. The Middle East mainly imports everything and anything this is part of the reason why they ...
    Related: middle east, north eastern, economic status, men and women, rice
  • Motivation - 1,312 words
    Motivation The need for action is pressing in order to feed the expanding human population, expected to increase by almost one billion people per decade for the next three decades at least. Much of this increase will occur in developing countries in the low-latitude regions of the world. To meet the associated food demand, crop yields will need to increase, consistently, by over 2% every year through this period. Most research on agriculture and climate change has focused on potential impacts on regional and global food production, yet few studies have considered how global warming may affect food security. Food security has been defined as access by all people at all times to enough food fo ...
    Related: motivation, population growth, trade liberalization, beneficial effects, inhibit
  • Nafta - 1,314 words
    ... acquire help with different companies, which in return make possible many consumer activities. An advantage to many of the Mexican consumers that cross the border everyday for goods and services is having the security of being able to rely on Mexican banks in operation here in the United States. In Return, Mexico will permit Canada and the United States to establish subsidiaries to engage in consumer opportunities for example, commercial lending, mortgage lending and the provision of credit cards. This will not only establish a market share, but will emphasize on national treatment. Another key element from the North American Free Trade Agreement is that the United States and Canada, wh ...
    Related: nafta, trade policy, reserve bank, federal reserve bank, canada
  • One Of The Greatest International Economic Debates Of All Time Has Been The Issue Of Free Trade Versus Protectionism Proponen - 1,889 words
    One of the greatest international economic debates of all time has been the issue of free trade versus protectionism. Proponents of free trade believe in opening the global market, with as few restrictions on trade as possible. Proponents of protectionism believe in concentrating on the welfare of the domestic economy by limiting the open-market policy of the United States. However, what effects does this policy have for the international market and the other respective countries in this market? The question is not as complex as it may seem. Both sides have strong viewpoints representing their respective opinions, and even the population of the United States is divided when it comes to takin ...
    Related: american free, controversial issue, economic development, economic freedom, economic stability, free market, free trade
  • Overpopulation - 703 words
    Overpopulation Refinance now homeowner even if you have bad credit. 185 loc Overpopulation During the first 2 million or so years of its history the human population was a minor element in the world ecosystem, with at most 10 million members. In the New Stone Age, less than 10,000 years ago, the number of humans began to increase more rapidly. The rough equilibrium maintained before Neolithic times gave way when the human population developed agriculture and animal husbandry and no longer had to spread out in search of game. With the abandonment of a hunting-gathering way of life and the rise of permanent settlements and eventually cities, the human population underwent dramatic growth. By t ...
    Related: overpopulation, bad credit, standard of living, psychology today, billions
  • Population Growth Problem - 1,850 words
    Population Growth Problem The growth of the worlds population is a problem that many people see as being addressed at some point in the future. While we live in a country that is reaping the benefits of a superpower, most of the United States is disconnected from the problems of population growth. In this paper, I intend to address three major issues. How long will we be able to support our planets food needs? How can we deal with population growth in the present day? And How come certain areas tend to have larger population growth than other areas? But first in this paper, I will see how the theories of sociologists and demographers fit into the Earths population problem. THEORIES MARX 1818 ...
    Related: population growth, population problem, world population, third world, states census bureau
  • Postwar - 1,766 words
    Postwar In the 1950's the number of people living in the suburbs came to actually equal the number of people living in cities. This wave of people was due mainly to the availability of affordable housing; which allowed middle-class Americans to move to an area previously inhabited only by the wealthy. The houses and neighborhoods built in mass numbers on assembly lines came to look identical to each other. As a result of this, a model American life was created. People all around the country began to follow this model, and before they knew it a race to conform had begun. People no longer strove to be different, neither by ethnicity nor religion; they strove to be the same. David Farber, the a ...
    Related: postwar, baby boom, good time, george w. bush, japan
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