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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: political theory

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  • Heidi Chronicles - 648 words
    Heidi Chronicles Heidi Holland and Feminism in The Heidi Chronicles Wendy Wassersteins The Heidi Chronicles attempts to demonstrate the futility of the womens rights movement, and its incapacity to fulfill the needs of all women. We trace the main character, Heidi, from the time she develops an interest in men, 1964, to the time where she gives up on men and decides to fulfill her own needs for a family by adopting a child. Wasserstein shows the infiltrating changes in the life of American women with humor and sentimentality. Trapped between the controlling factors of responsibility and love, men and motherhood, gender and political theory, Heidi and her friends search for understanding and ...
    Related: heidi, american women, rights movement, main character, session
  • Historical Transformation Of Class - 1,153 words
    Historical Transformation Of Class Historical materialism is the Marxist approach for interpreting history. It is the interpretation of relations between groups of people and the resulting class struggles. According to Marxist theory, there exists a sequence of historical stages each with its own ruling class. Under feudalism the ruling class is the nobility, whereas the capitalists are predominant in capitalism, and socialism has its proletariats. An understanding of historical materialism is of importance to the ideology of a Marxist, working-class party, and therefore, its program and policy must be based on an understanding of the same in order to be successful. Without knowledge of and ...
    Related: class struggle, historical materialism, middle class, ruling class, transformation, working class
  • Huey P Newton And The Black Panther Party - 1,483 words
    Huey P. Newton And The Black Panther Party During the late 1960's and early '70's posters of the Black Panther Party's co-founder, Huey P. Newton were plastered on walls of college dorm rooms across the country. Wearing a black beret and a leather jacket, sitting on a wicker chair, a spear in one hand and a rifle in the other, the poster depicted Huey Newton as a symbol of his generation's anger and courage in the face of racism and imperialism (Albert and Hoffman 4, 45). His intellectual capacity and community leadership abilities helped to founded the Black Panther Party (BPP). Newton played an instrumental role in refocusing civil rights activists to the problems of urban Black communitie ...
    Related: black community, black panther, black panther party, black people, black power, black power movement, black studies
  • Human Rights - 1,393 words
    Human Rights On December tenth 1948 in the Palis de Chaillot in Paris, the United Nation's General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The document is made up of thirty articles which deal with a series of basic human rights and duties. It follows the premise that " the declaration is a common standard of achievement for all peoples and nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both amon ...
    Related: cultural rights, human beings, human rights, individual rights, legal rights, universal declaration of human rights
  • Human Rights - 1,393 words
    Human Rights On December tenth 1948 in the Palis de Chaillot in Paris, the United Nation's General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The document is made up of thirty articles which deal with a series of basic human rights and duties. It follows the premise that " the declaration is a common standard of achievement for all peoples and nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both amon ...
    Related: cultural rights, human beings, human rights, individual rights, legal rights, universal declaration of human rights
  • Human Rights - 1,393 words
    Human Rights On December tenth 1948 in the Palis de Chaillot in Paris, the United Nation's General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The document is made up of thirty articles which deal with a series of basic human rights and duties. It follows the premise that " the declaration is a common standard of achievement for all peoples and nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both amon ...
    Related: cultural rights, human beings, human rights, individual rights, legal rights, universal declaration of human rights
  • Human Rights - 1,393 words
    Human Rights On December tenth 1948 in the Palis de Chaillot in Paris, the United Nation's General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The document is made up of thirty articles which deal with a series of basic human rights and duties. It follows the premise that " the declaration is a common standard of achievement for all peoples and nations, to the end that every individual and every organ of society, keeping this declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both amon ...
    Related: cultural rights, human beings, human rights, individual rights, legal rights, universal declaration of human rights
  • Isaiah Berlin - 1,058 words
    Isaiah Berlin Isaiah Berlin became one of our centurys most important political theorists for liberty and liberalism in an age of totalitarianism. He was born in Riga, Latvia in 1909 into a well to do Jewish family. At the age of 12 he moved to Petrograd and experienced first hand the Bolshevik revolution, which would later influence his intellectual ideas about totalitarianism (Gray 3). In 1921 his family moved to London and sent Isaiah to school. His schooling lead him to Oxford where he took a position as philosophy professor in 1931. His English schooling led him to become a disciple of classical liberalism in the English tradition of Mill, Locke, and others (Berger). During World War II ...
    Related: berlin, isaiah, political theory, foreign service, hardy
  • Liberaliam - 1,118 words
    ... tury. Norman Davies describes liberalism as "being developed along two parallel tracks, the political and the economic. Political liberalism focused on the essential concept of government by consent. In its most thoroughgoing form it embraced republicanism, though most liberals favored a popular, limited, and fair-minded monarch as a factor encouraging stability." (A History of Europe, p.802) At the core of liberalism was the idea of freedom of thought and expression. People were now not only able to think for themselves, but also express those same thoughts. Popular sovereignty was also a very strong tenet of liberalism. Popular sovereignty advocated that government derives its power fr ...
    Related: modern times, freedom of speech, freedom of religion, liberty, principal
  • Little White Lie - 1,904 words
    Little White Lie Orwell & Marx Animalism vs. Marxism Every line I have written since 1936 has been written, directly or indirectly, against totalitarianism, quotes George Orwell in the preface to the 1956 Signet Classic edition of Animal Farm. The edition, which sold several millions copies, however, omitted the rest of the sentence: and for democratic Socialism, as I understand it. It is in Animal Farm, written in 1944 but not published until after World War Two in 1945, which Orwell offers a political and social doctrine whose ideas and ideols can be seen in all of his proceeding works. In an essay published in the summer of 1946 entitled Why I Write, Orwell claimed to have been motivated ...
    Related: boxer rebellion, human life, democratic socialism, orwell, josef
  • Locke And Rousseau - 1,588 words
    Locke And Rousseau The idea of consent is a key element in the works of John Locke and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. In the "Second Treatise of Government," Locke puts forth his conception of the ideal form of government based on a social contract. As Locke develops his theory of consent, he also incorporates theories of political obligation on the part of all citizens of his state as well as his theory of revolution and the conditions under which rebellion is permissible. Though Locke may appear to have explored the notion of consent completely, there are some problems with his theory that weaken its impact. Despite the possible problems encountered with Lockes idea of consent in a political socie ...
    Related: jacques rousseau, jean jacques rousseau, john locke, locke, rousseau
  • Locke And The Rights Of Children - 1,738 words
    Locke and the Rights of Children Locke firmly denies Filmer's theory that it is morally permissible for parents to treat their children however they please: "They who allege the Practice of Mankind, for exposing or selling their Children, as a Proof of their Power over them, are with Sir Rob. happy Arguers, and cannot but recommend their Opinion by founding it on the most shameful Action, and most unnatural Murder, humane Nature is capable of." (First Treatise, sec.56) Rather, Locke argues that children have the same moral rights as any other person, though the child's inadequate mental faculties make it permissible for his parents to rule over him to a limited degree. "Thus we are born Free ...
    Related: children's rights, human rights, locke, rights of children, political philosophy
  • Marxism And Capitalism - 1,311 words
    Marxism And Capitalism Modern Marxs theoretical work is the understanding of the nature of human beings and how they have constructed their historical world. Marx is considered a modernist because his views and theories fit the meaning of Modernity, which are human freedom and the right to free choice. To Marx, Capitalism is a barrier to the notion of human freedom and choice. Five aspects of his political theory which are modern is how he views human nature, effects of Capitalism on human natures with emphasis on significance of labor, class struggles within Capitalism, the demise of Capitalism and the need for the transition to Communism. Marx belief of human nature is that it changes over ...
    Related: capitalism, marxism, changing world, surplus value, invest
  • Must Individual Rights Be Supplemented By Some Form Of Group Rights - 1,422 words
    Must Individual Rights Be Supplemented By Some Form Of Group Rights There are two main forms of group rights, characterised by the way in which they are distributed and exercised. The first example of group rights is a differential distribution of individual rights. In this model, an individual may have more rights than others on the basis of some kind of 'selection criteria.' The most common being on the grounds of race or ethnicity, for instance in the former South Africa, rights were distributed on a decreasing scale, according to the colour of a persons skin. The second type of group right is a right which a group exercises collectively, it is a right that everyone has, but no one person ...
    Related: civil rights, human rights, individual rights, human nature, public policy
  • National Collective Action - 1,289 words
    National Collective Action The framers of the U.S. Constitution were men who wanted to solve the problems of collective action and agency loss. The Articles of Confederation contained many weaknesses, and to amend this, the framers sought to create a strong central government that could delegate authority and cut down transaction costs. Many compromises were necessary in order to solve these conflicts. The framers adopted certain changes that helped to balance the need for effective national collective action against the dangers inherent in the delegation of any authority. This balance represented the political theory that was the basis for the Constitution, and it created the background for ...
    Related: collective, collective action, rights movement, political issues, obstacle
  • One Of The Most Popular Social Groups Of The Last Three Thousand Years Is Religion Although It Has Existed From Seemingly The - 1,058 words
    ... y each specific person's overall rewards. To truly determine how good religion is we must look at its effects on society as a whole. Religion as it pertains to society has both its good sides and its bad sides. One must look at both sides and see which side should dominate. Once again we must look at this issue in two parts: Do the boundaries created by such acts hinder society's movement toward unification? Does religion serve as a "drug" for the people, something to believe in? Can religious preservation hinder the scientific search for truth? As in the individual's case we examine the effect of boundaries. In an industrialized nation where work is being done to remove these boundar ...
    Related: religion, seemingly, social forces, social groups, political theory
  • Philosophy Nozicks Entiltlement Theory - 1,980 words
    ... oals. Why must we respect such constraints? When a person makes a thing, or finds it unowned and appropriates it, why must others not use it without his permission - no matter how great their need, no matter how such things are distributed? Nozick's answer is that such constraints express the inviolability of other persons; a person is not to be used to benefit others - this would not sufficiently respect the fact that he is a separate person, that his is the only life he has. There is no transcendent social whole for the sake of which individuals can be sacrificed, there are only other individuals. See p. 32-3, 50-1. In effect Nozick agrees with Rawls's criticism of Utilitarianism: in a ...
    Related: philosophy, political theory, individual rights, distributive justice, surprising
  • Pierre Trudeau, Former Prime Minister Of Canada, Was Once Described As A French Canadian Proud Of His Identity And Culture, Y - 1,562 words
    Pierre Trudeau, former Prime Minister of Canada, was once described as "A French Canadian proud of his identity and culture, yet a biting critic of French-Canadian society, determined to destroy its mythology and illusions". He has also been identified as "A staunch, upholder of provincial autonomy holding the justice portfolio in the federal government". Such cumulative appraisal and observation made by past fellow bureaucrat provides high testimonial for the ex-Democratic Socialist. This critique will establish and dispute the prime directives that Trudeau had advocated in his own book written during the years 1965 to 1967. The compilation of political essays featured in his book deal with ...
    Related: canadian, canadian government, canadian history, canadian politics, canadian society, french canadian, french canadians
  • Plato - 1,175 words
    Plato The most comprehensive statement of Platos mature philosophical views appears in The Republic, an extended approach to the most fundamental principles for the conduct of human nature. Using the character Socrates as a fictional spokesman, Plato considers the nature and value of justice and the other virtues as they appear both in the structure of society as a whole, and in the personality of an individual human being. This naturally leads to discussions of human nature, the achievement of knowledge, the distinction between appearance and reality, the components of an effective education, and the foundations of morality. Plato formulates a conception of the complexity of psychological m ...
    Related: plato, political theory, common good, general description, routledge
  • Plato And Forms - 1,257 words
    Plato And Forms Platos Forms The influence that Plato, the Greek philosopher born in 427 BC in Athens, has had throughout the history of philosophy has been monumental. Among other things, Plato is known for his exploration of the fundamental problems of natural science, political theory, metaphysics, theology and theory of knowledge; many of his ideas becoming permanent elements in Western thought. The basis of Plato's philosophy is his theory of Ideas, or doctrine of Forms. While the notion of Forms is essential to Plato's philosophy, over years of philosophical study, it has been difficult to understand what these Forms are supposed to be, and the purpose of their existence. When examinin ...
    Related: plato, allegory of the cave, greek philosopher, political theory, rarely
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