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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: political theory

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  • A More Perfect Union: - 1,031 words
    A More Perfect Union: The Articles of Confederation The determined Madison had for several years insatiably studied history and political theory searching for a solution to the political and economic dilemmas he saw plaguing America. The Virginian's labors convinced him of the futility and weakness of confederacies of independent states. America's own government under the Articles of Confederation, Madison was convinced, had to be replaced. In force since 1781, established as a league of friendship and a constitution for the 13 sovereign and independent states after the Revolution, the articles seemed to Madison woefully inadequate. With the states retaining considerable power, the central g ...
    Related: more perfect union, circuit court, political machine, political theory, convention
  • Anarchy - 1,645 words
    Anarchy Anarchism seems to be defined many ways by many different sources. Most dictionary definitions define anarchism as the absence of government. A leading modern dictionary, Webster's Third International Dictionary, defines anarchism briefly but accurately as, "a political theory opposed to all forms of government and governmental restraint and advocating voluntary cooperation and free association of individuals and groups in order to satisfy their needs." Other dictionaries describe anarchism with similar definitions. The Britannica-Webster dictionary defines the word anarchism as, "a political theory that holds all government authority to be unnecessary and undesirable and advocates a ...
    Related: anarchy, william godwin, working class, utopian society, empower
  • Anarchy - 718 words
    Anarchy Anarchy, coming from the greek term meaning "without government", is the political theory that society does not need a government to run the country or any governmental fundings (although robbing them of what they robbed us wouldn't hurt). Many people believe that anarchy is a horrible and impossible way of living, stating that anarchism would leave us vulnerable to criminals and terrorists. This may be because of the terroristic methods that anarchists have taken to reach their ultimate goal. The terroristic anarchism movement came under the leadership of Mikhail Bakunin in the 1800's, and have continued with most individual anarchists and anarchist groups. I admit, there are some v ...
    Related: anarchy, mikhail bakunin, american government, political theory, constitution
  • Aristotle B 384 D 322 Bc, Was A Greek Philosopher, Logician, - 1,556 words
    Aristotle (b. 384 - d. 322 BC), was a Greek philosopher, logician, and scientist. Along with his teacher Plato, Aristotle is generally regarded as one of the most influential ancient thinkers in a number of philosophical fields, including political theory. Aristotle was born in Stagira in northern Greece, and his father was a court physician to the king of Macedon. As a young man he studied in Plato's Academy in Athens. After Plato's death he left Athens to conduct philosophical and biological research in Asia Minor and Lesbos, and he was then invited by King Philip II of Macedon to tutor his young son, Alexander the Great. Soon after Alexander succeeded his father, consolidated the conquest ...
    Related: aristotle, classical greek, greek, greek philosopher, human beings
  • Aristotles Political Ideal - 1,155 words
    ... nt in nature, so he did not challenge the institution of slavery. Euripides and Alcidamas did in their thinking. Aristotle believed heavily in a graduated class system that would include such classes as agricultural workers, craftsmen, and paid laborers. The agricultural workers, Aristotle concludes, will be slaves, or non-Greeks, dwelling in the area surrounding the city. But the class most important to maintain the state, Aristotle refers to as the ruling class. This class will take care of the military and deliberative elements of the state. This is the ruling class that was previously discussed as the citizens of Aristotle's Ideal State. They would live neither a commercial life nor ...
    Related: ideal state, political theory, basic elements, modern western, workers
  • Birth Of A New Era - 1,903 words
    Birth Of A New Era Despite the problems of the fourteenth century, it marked the beginnings of extraordinary changes in numerous facets of fifteenth century society. This astonishing revolution was coined the Renaissance, which meant "rebirth." The Renaissance led to such literary pioneers as Niccol Machiavelli. His work, The Prince, gave detailed instructions as to what qualities a perfect leader must possess and how to use these qualities. Machiavelli presented a thorough account of a perfect prince and how he achieved and maintained power. Machiavelli's The Prince is a classic literary example of Renaissance writing in the ideas it conveys and how it conveys them. The Renaissance, a time ...
    Related: most effective, main theme, medieval period, personality, leisure
  • Book Ii Of The Politics By Aristotle - 1,967 words
    Book Ii Of The Politics By Aristotle Bill Stewart October 14, 2000 Intro to Political Philosophy Paper Assignment #1, Essay 5 In Book II of The Politics Aristotle uses the examples of a number of political regimes in order to show the reader the nature of political life. In relating what is and what is not included in these regimes, discussing the problems associated with each of these, and by examining how well all of these regimes agree with Aristotle's own theory, Aristotle provides the reader with a comprehensive view of political life with regard to the nature of regimes. Three of the accounts of political life that are discussed are most useful in understanding Aristotle's own theory, ...
    Related: aristotle, paper assignment, problems associated, problems encountered, notion
  • China Economic Growth - 2,074 words
    China Economic Growth Two years after the death of Mao Zedong in 1976, it became apparent to many of China's leaders that economic reform was necessary. During his tenure as China's premier, Mao had encouraged social movements such as the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution, which had as their bases ideologies such as serving the people and maintaining the class struggle. By 1978 "Chinese leaders were searching for a solution to serious economic problems produced by Hua Guofeng, the man who had succeeded Mao Zedong as CCP leader after Mao's death" (Shirk 35). Hua had demonstrated a desire to continue the ideologically based movements of Mao. Unfortunately, these movements had left ...
    Related: china, chinese economic, economic crisis, economic development, economic growth, economic performance, economic reform
  • Confucianism, The Philosophical System Founded On The Teaching Of Confucius, Who Lived From 551 Bc To 479 Bc, Dominated Chine - 647 words
    Confucianism, the philosophical system founded on the teaching of Confucius, who lived from 551 BC to 479 BC, dominated Chinese sociopolitical life for most of the Chinese history and largely influenced the cultures of Korea, Japan, and Indochina. The Confucian school functioned as a recruiting ground for government positions, which were filled by those scoring highest on examinations in the Confucian classics. It also blended with popular and important religions and became the vehicle for presenting Chinese values to the peasants. The school's doctrine supported political authority using the theory of the mandate of heaven. It sought to help rulers maintain domestic order, preserve traditio ...
    Related: founded, philosophical, acquiring knowledge, standard of living, mandate
  • Engl: Book Critique Mark Posters The Mode Of Information - 1,361 words
    ENGL444: BOOK CRITIQUE - Mark Posters "The Mode of Information" Maitiu Ward Mark Posters "The Mode of Information" can be seen as something of an attempt to establish a new discourse in socio-political theory. He does this mainly through the concerted criticism of several prominent philosophers, including Marx, Foucault, Derrida and Baudrillard. Typically, his prime concern with the bulk of most of these philosophers works is their tendency towards totalization, or their failure to adequately incorporate an understanding of what Poster sees as the "mode of information" into their theorizing. From what remains of his counterparts theories, Poster attempts to assemble his new discourse, incorp ...
    Related: book critique, critique, mark, mode, brief overview
  • Engl: Book Critique Mark Posters The Mode Of Information - 1,359 words
    ... n of traditional Japanese cultural values with American consumer culture. In fact, anywhere where capitalism and consumer culture exist, we can find evidence of what could be seen as the de-centering of identity via the messages and demands of new Media. The individual "freedom" which Poster believes a de-centering of cultural identity via new Media entails raises some doubts questionable, however. Poster believes that through this de-centering force, individuals gain "freedom" from pre-conceived notions of their potential identity and place in the world. Thus the "de-centering" of their previously ordained identity ( ordained in the sense in which it is established for them by their soc ...
    Related: book critique, critique, mark, mode, american consumer
  • Enlightened Darkness - 1,606 words
    Enlightened Darkness Enlightened Darkness When I am asked to determine if I am a "child of the Enlightenment," the first thoughts that come to my mind question the characteristics of the Enlightenment. What kind of movement was it? Who else claims to support Enlightenment ideals? What characteristics are associated with the Enlightenment, and do I want to label myself as sharing these? It didn't take much time for me to happily embrace the fact that I am a "child of the Enlightenment." The Enlightenment encompasses many ideas concerning knowledge, political theory, science, and economic theory. The Enlightenment worldview stresses reason instead of authority and revelation. Enlightened think ...
    Related: darkness, enlightened, stuart mill, human rights, foresee
  • Environmental Racism - 424 words
    Environmental Racism? There is a political theory of justice that was created by John Rawls that states, that all rational members of society in the original position should make decisions. Rawls called this method as a veil of ignorance. This is used as an instrument to make decisions in developing local projects. In the United States there is a spectacle called NIMBYism, which stands for Not-In-My-BackYard. This is when a group of a local community members protest about developments or a certain development in their community. NIMBYism could be a good or bad spectacle, which depends on what activities are suspended because of it. A bad view of this would be if there were no developments. T ...
    Related: environmental, environmental issues, racism, puerto rican, local community
  • Federalism Comparison - 1,213 words
    Federalism Comparison Diego Ochoa PSCI 499 5/29/00 Second Midterm The Constitution of the United States was drafted at a time when our country was in dire need of many answers to political and social questions. In addition to many other things, the drafters of the Constitution were concerned with solidifying our central government and the Constitution was intended to provide a solid structure from which our burgeoning nation could grow. The Constitution gave explicit powers to the federal government and provided the states with the Tenth Amendment which states ,"Powers not delegated to the United States, nor prohibited to the states, are reserved to the states respectively ... " Of the enume ...
    Related: comparison, cooperative federalism, federalism, states rights, anti-trust laws
  • Foreign Aid - 1,654 words
    Foreign Aid Since the 90's, the Western governments have increased their interest in funding civil society in Africa to promote democratization. This discussion paper examines how a range of foreign donors, including Western Governments, multilateral agencies and Non- Governmental Organizations (NGO's) have developed "civil society" in Ghana, South Africa and Uganda. Other important assistance comes from Civil Society Organizations (CSO's) to assist in basic provisions for food health and shelters. The three countries discussed in this essay are viewed as models by the Western World since they are amongst the African nations that receive the most foreign aid. For example, in 1995 South Afric ...
    Related: foreign aid, human rights, michigan state, important role, democratization
  • Govern And Politics - 1,450 words
    Govern And Politics Government law and politics The Government is a political organization comprising individuals and institutions authorized to formulate public policies and conduct affairs of state. Governments are empowered to establish and regulate the interrelationships of the people within their territory and the relations of the people with the community as a whole. Government applies in this sense both to the governments of national states, such as the federal government of the U.S., and to the governments of subdivisions of national states, such as the state, county, and municipal governments of the U.S. The word government may refer to the people who form the supreme administrative ...
    Related: american politics, comparative politics, govern, local politics, president george
  • Greek Philosophers - 969 words
    Greek Philosophers Socrates, Plato and Aristotle had virtually the same beliefs about man's relation to the State, although Plato's political theory of the State was more rational than Socrates or Aristotle's. Socrates, Plato and Aristotle all believed that man was not self-sufficient, they believed man would be most happy living in a State. They also believed that all men wanted to live the truly good life where they could be in tune with the truth and achieve their ultimate goals. Although Socrates, Plato and Aristotle's political views of the State are similar, Plato's view is more rational than Socrates and Aristotle's in the sense that he created an ideal State. Socrates, Plato and Aris ...
    Related: greek, ideal state, point of view, decision making, music
  • Greek Philosophers - 969 words
    Greek Philosophers Socrates, Plato and Aristotle had virtually the same beliefs about man's relation to the State, although Plato's political theory of the State was more rational than Socrates or Aristotle's. Socrates, Plato and Aristotle all believed that man was not self-sufficient, they believed man would be most happy living in a State. They also believed that all men wanted to live the truly good life where they could be in tune with the truth and achieve their ultimate goals. Although Socrates, Plato and Aristotle's political views of the State are similar, Plato's view is more rational than Socrates and Aristotle's in the sense that he created an ideal State. Socrates, Plato and Aris ...
    Related: greek, moral character, ideal state, point of view, plato
  • Hamlet: Notes - 1,478 words
    Hamlet: Notes -1- Act 1 Scene 1 1. The atmosphere or tension is established trough use of ghost as the super natural, the mystery, the unknown. A wrong is known to have accrued or about to happen. This creates intrigue and suspense. 2. Many changes take place in Horatio's attitude towards the ghost. At first it is known to us that Horatio does not believe that the ghost actually exists. 3. The background information we are given about the state of affairs in Denmark and about the relationship between Denmark and Norway is that something is wrong in Denmark and that Denmark and Norway had been in combat. 4. We are introduced to the subject of law and rebellion trough the introduction of Forti ...
    Related: notes, background information, good intentions, political theory, atmosphere
  • Hamlet: Notes - 1,478 words
    Hamlet: Notes -1- Act 1 Scene 1 1. The atmosphere or tension is established trough use of ghost as the super natural, the mystery, the unknown. A wrong is known to have accrued or about to happen. This creates intrigue and suspense. 2. Many changes take place in Horatio's attitude towards the ghost. At first it is known to us that Horatio does not believe that the ghost actually exists. 3. The background information we are given about the state of affairs in Denmark and about the relationship between Denmark and Norway is that something is wrong in Denmark and that Denmark and Norway had been in combat. 4. We are introduced to the subject of law and rebellion trough the introduction of Forti ...
    Related: notes, political theory, good intentions, king claudius, slave
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