Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: political climate

  • 34 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • A Global War Or An Intercontinental Nuclear Exchange Is Highly Unlikely In The Current World Political Climate But As Long As - 1,605 words
    A global war or an intercontinental nuclear exchange is highly unlikely in the current world political climate. But as long as considerable nuclear weapons and long range delivery systems exist in other countries and a developing threat resides with potential adversaries, the possibility of an aerospace attack on North America cannot be discounted. Furthermore, the proliferation of cruise and ballistic missiles, and weapons of mass destruction, has made the post-Cold War world more, rather than less, dangerous. New generations of these weapons may be in the hands of governments or organizations which could threaten the North American continent, or American and Canadian military personnel dep ...
    Related: climate, intercontinental, nuclear, nuclear weapons, political climate
  • Abortion - 1,190 words
    Abortion Almost half of American women have terminated at least one pregnancy, and millions more Americans of both sexes have helped them, as partners, parents, health-care workers, counselors, friends. Collectively, it would seem, Americans have quite a bit of knowledge and experience of abortion. Yet the debate over legal abortion is curiously abstract: we might be discussing brain transplants. Farfetched analogies abound: abortion is like the Holocaust, or slavery; denial of abortion is like forcing a person to spend nine months intravenously hooked up to a medically endangered stranger who happens to be a famous violinist. It sometimes seems that the further abortion is removed from the ...
    Related: abortion, abortion debate, legalizing abortion, nineteenth century, control laws
  • Alcohol Related Deaths - 1,125 words
    Alcohol Related Deaths More than 100,000 deaths per year are attributed to alcohol, in the United States. Alcohol-related auto accidents account for approximately 24,000 of these deaths (most often the victims are under 30 years of age), while alcohol-related homicide account for 11,000 and suicide 8,000 deaths. Certain types of cancer, which are partly associated with the consumption of alcohol, contribute to another 17,000 deaths. Alcohol-related strokes are responsible for 9,000 deaths. 25,000 lost lives are due to 12 alcohol-related diseases including cirrhosis of the liver. All these deaths combined are the equivalent of 200 jumbo jetliners crashing and taking the lives of everyone onbo ...
    Related: alcohol, american journal, vitamin c, nobel prize, liver
  • Birth Of Communication - 2,409 words
    ... the world was looking at America wondering what it would do next. As communication helped the word spread about this "land of opportunity" more and more people wanted to immigrate, or at least come to America to see what all the talk was about. Many Chinese and Japanese came to the United States and saw it first hand from the 1860's on (Iriye, 39). For the Chinese the personal meeting did not make as grand of an impression as it did for the Japanese. For example, the Japanese were almost desperately interested in learning more about the military strength and power that the West held. However, the Chinese government was perfectly happy with maintaining their status quo. Although it is dif ...
    Related: cultural communication, intercultural communication, international communication, cultural imperialism, greenwood press
  • Caesar And Brutus - 436 words
    Caesar And Brutus Brutus was a trusted friend of Caesar and an honorable man, or so you thought. In William Shakespeare's The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, Brutus is presented as a loyal companion to Caesar showing himself as honorable only to turn around and betray his friend by death. This to me does not sound like the act of an honorable man. Can a man who is honored, be honorable? Brutus was a noble man in Rome and a good friend to the leader Caesar. Many looked up to Brutus as an honest man, and a person to trust and confide in. Trust is a basis in a friendship, and the one thing that failed to enter the relationship between Caesar and Brutus, leading to the one thing to drive their friends ...
    Related: brutus, caesar, julius caesar, political climate, william shakespeare
  • Culture And Music Of The 70s - 1,240 words
    Culture And Music Of The 70'S Term Paper Music is an outlet to all aspects of life and culture is a significant way of forming people and the way they live. Although not always seen directly culture has an overbearing influence on the music that is produced and made popular. The political Climate of the early seventies was full of fire with issues such as Vietnam and constant protest throughout the county. Later in the 70's the end of the Vietnamese conflict brought the rise of the Watergate scandal and Iran Contra. These issues swept headlines and ingrained people's thoughts. Social issues also played a big role in the developing culture of the seventies. Protests and constant outbreaks abo ...
    Related: music, music industry, popular music, rock music, american history
  • Culture And Music Of The 70s - 1,285 words
    ... groups continued to produce songs that highly promoted the idea of peace and joy throughout the world. A common song for peace that was found in the times was "I'd Like to Teach the World To Sing (In Perfect Harmony)" by The New Seekers. The songs lyrics ring of the themes love and peace. "I'd like to build the world a home, and furnish it with love," is an example of the topic and theme the song was trying to portray. "And hear them echo through the hills "Ah, peace throughout the land," is a direct relation to The New Seekers feelings of the rising war scene in Vietnam. As the theme of peace became so obvious throughout the nation many other groups also composed songs that dealt with ...
    Related: black music, music, music lovers, great artists, first person
  • Discourse Analysis - 1,627 words
    Discourse Analysis DISCOURSE ANALYSIS This discourse analysis attempts to answer several questions regarding Chairman Hyde's speech against the president. Firstly an attempt has been made to uncover some of the more prevalent themes and discourses in the hope that they will give some kind of enlightenment of American society and culture. Secondly, this analysis describes the many ways in which Chairman Hyde attempts to persuade his audience of his cause. The portrayed image of President Clinton is then focused on, and finally there is a discussion relating to the various social codes implied within Hyde's speech. It has been found that many of these areas overlap to a greater or lesser degre ...
    Related: discourse, american culture, equal justice, higher level, heroism
  • Discrimination - 1,717 words
    Discrimination Discrimination The struggle for social and economic equality of Black people in America has been long and slow. It is sometimes amazing that any progress has been made in the racial equality arena at all; every tentative step forward seems to be diluted by losses elsewhere. For every Stacey Koons that is convicted, there seems to be a Texaco executive waiting to send Blacks back to the past. Throughout the struggle for equal rights, there have been courageous Black leaders at the forefront of each discrete movement. From early activists such as Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, and W.E.B. DuBois, to 1960s civil rights leaders and radicals such as Martin Luther King, Ma ...
    Related: discrimination, racial discrimination, black experience, civil rights, folk
  • Free Market Defense - 1,124 words
    Free Market Defense Ludwig von Mises: Defender of the Free Market Ludwig von Misis thoughts on human behavior, socialism, and money and credit have had a major impact on economic thought. He championed true free markets and is seen as a defender of liberty. Former President of the United States Ronald Reagan said "Ludwig von Mises was one of the greatest economic thinkers in the history of Western Civilization. Through his seminal works, he rekindled the flames of liberty. As a wise and kindly mentor, he encourages all who sought to understand the meaning of freedom. We owe him an incalculable debt"(Mises Institute). The remainder of this paper will outline the life of Ludwig von Mises. This ...
    Related: free market, market, factors influencing, international studies, science
  • Griswold V Connecticut - 1,061 words
    ... erpreted this ruling, and established marriage, as already stated by Justice Douglas, an association. In addition, the court argues that: (in NAACP v. Alabama) Awe protected the *freedom to associate and privacy in one=s association=, noting that freedom of association was a peripheral First Amendment right.@ Therefore, as marriage being an association, it must have a certain facet of privacy. In dissent of these judgements, were justices Black and Steward. They dissent on the belief that there is no specified Aright of privacy@ in the constitution, but a protection of privacy. In addition, they argue that the other justices are taking the due process clause out of context. AI do not bel ...
    Related: connecticut, griswold, state laws, political climate, prohibited
  • Hulliung And Machiavelli - 1,150 words
    Hulliung And Machiavelli Is Hulliung right? Hulliung discusses how people understand Machiavelli and what he thinks of some of Machiavellis concepts. In the chapter of "interpreting Machiavelli", Hulliung argues in the issues of means and ends, idealism Vs realism, political violence and weather Machiavelli is a pagan. His ideas somewhat seem to be convincing. However, the question is, is Hulliung fair in judging Machiavelli? Or is he immoral? Hulliung thinks that there are no differences between ends and means. In other words if the means are violent, in his view, the ends will be violent as well. What Hulliung says is that nothing can justify a means except the end that it is intended to s ...
    Related: machiavelli, economic globalization, religions of the world, political climate, fraud
  • Juan Domingo Pern: Argentine Master Of Labor And Leader Of The Masses - 2,052 words
    Juan Domingo Pern: Argentine Master Of Labor And Leader Of The Masses Juan Domingo Pern, born in 1895 in Lobos, Argentina, was the President of Argentina on two occasions separated by eighteen years. He first came to power by the election of February 28,1946. He ruled for almost ten years until he was pressured to resign by the Argentine military and in September of 1955 he left the country. He spent almost the next twenty years in exile but never lost touch with the Argentine people and especially the Argentine labor movement. In 1973, after eighteen years of exile, Pern returned to Argentina and was elected president again with his third wife Isabel as vice-president. His power as a ruler ...
    Related: argentine, department of labor, domingo, juan, labor, labor department, labor movement
  • Juan Domingo Pern: Argentine Master Of Labor And Leader Of The Masses - 2,015 words
    ... aving the army with less anti-Peronist sentiment than prior to the revolt. Although the majority of the army was strictly Peronist after the September 28th unsuccessful uprising, there were other forces of dissent still alive in the social picture. At the beginning of his rule Pern had been seeking the support of the Church and had seen considerable success in that regard. (Whitaker, 1968) But after the first few years of his regime there developed a fair amount of tension between the Church and Pern. By 1954 Church officials were outraged by measures taken by Pern to legalize divorce and prostitution as well as the elimination of religion from education. As the Church was more moved by ...
    Related: argentine, domingo, juan, labor, labor movement, labor union, masses
  • Julius And Ethel Rosenberg - 1,447 words
    Julius and Ethel Rosenberg The outcome of the Julius and Ethel Rosenberg trial for espionage in 1951 and their subsequent execution in 1953 was directly related to the political climate at that time. The governments evidence against the Rosenbergs was not overwhelming, but due to a combination of fear and political pressure, the guilty verdict was inevitable. Even though Julius did not deliver the secrets of the atomic bomb to Moscow, nor did they cause the Korean War, as Judge Kaufman claimed, the pair were sentenced to death. Their death confirmed their guilt because America would never kill innocent people. Their execution also reinforced the heinous nature of their crime and other soviet ...
    Related: ethel, julius, rosenberg, witch hunts, political climate
  • Labor Issues - 2,199 words
    ... e people asked felt that unions are no longer necessary in todays American society. Furthermore, one in five of the sample population taking part in this survey were union members, and of these, 25% agreed that unions are no longer important (American Labor, 1998). The disparity in conclusions between these reports only begins to show the uncertainty facing the labor movement. Who Benefits From Unions? Before accounting for the decline in union enrollment, it suffices to consider who is impacted by todays unions? Literature is consistent in that members of strong unions tend to make more money and receive better benefits than non-union workers in the same jobs (Dessler, 1997). While unio ...
    Related: american labor, issues relating, labor, labor issues, labor movement, labor unions, organized labor
  • Labor Unions And Nursing - 1,455 words
    Labor Unions And Nursing The American Labor movement in the United States has a history dating back to the beginnings of the industrial revolution. Its existence is due to poor working conditions and exploitation during the beginning of that time. Labor unions have had a long history of using their most powerful weapon, strikes, to fight their battles. Even today, with the diminishing numbers of union members, strikes appear in the news sporadically. History of Labor Unions The first strike is thought to be by printers in Philadelphia in 1786 (Maidment, 1997). Working conditions, pay and benefits were so poor, leaders in the southern United States used them to justify slavery. Their contenti ...
    Related: american labor, international union, labor, labor market, labor movement, labor organization, labor relations
  • Last Hurrah - 1,149 words
    Last Hurrah Edwin O'Connor's novel The Last Hurrah presents an effective view of the difficult and complex life of the Irish-American community in Boston of the 1950's. The author uses a number of characterizations to produce themes that relate to the political and social considerations of this era. He also provides most of the accounts in his novel from a single perspective, that of Frank Skeffington. He is the main character. This character in particular enables O'Connor to present the topic with some accuracy while continuing to create a fictional account of the time frame. This was his goal, to provide truth inside a fictional story. O'Connor talks directly about and gives great consider ...
    Related: criminal activity, self identity, political history, prejudice, accurate
  • Machiavellis The Prince Has Long Been Used And Studied As A Manual For Those Who Are Already In Power Or For Those Who Wish T - 896 words
    Machiavelli's The Prince has long been used and studied as a manual for those who are already in power or for those who wish to have power. Through rational thinking about political power, Machiavelli is the authoritative source on how one should lead and govern. To illustrate his points, Machiavelli uses many examples of leadership from his life and some from history before 1469. To many readers however these examples are not of relevance anymore because the examples are so dated. To bring the influence back into The Prince, we must put the work into a more modern context. In chapter 16, Machiavelli debates on whether it is better to be liberal or stingy in governing. In a leader both of th ...
    Related: manual, niccolo machiavelli, political power, prince, the prince
  • Martin Luther King - 2,450 words
    ... that he soon found himself in that role. His leadership was not limited to speaking from a podium, i.e. taxied people during bus boycotts in Montgomery, Alabama in 1955-56. *censored*From childhood he was grounded in the idea of a personal God. He believed in the dignity and worth of all humans. During his post-graduate years, he became most influenced by Mahatma Gandhi and his idea of non-violent resistance. Due to differences in situations, it was uncertain whether the same tactics would work, i.e. in India, the majority was in support of Gandhi where in the United States the black population is a minority. Personality develops and grows with us but Dr. King never lost focus of his goa ...
    Related: luther, luther king, martin, martin luther, martin luther king jr
  • 34 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2