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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: poetry

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  • 16th Century Poetry - 1,273 words
    16Th Century Poetry Part I: 1. Name three of the Germanic tribes that brought to England the dialects that make up the basis of the language we now call Old English. The Germanic tribes that brought the dialects were the Angles, the Saxons, and the Jutes. 2. Give an example from Beowulf of three of the following poetic devices: alliteration, the kenning, variation (repetition of appositives), or the litote (understatement). There are several examples of alliteration in lines 3079-3084, "Nothing we advised could ever convince the prince we loved, our land's guardian, not to vex the custodian of the gold, let him lie where he was long accustomed, lurk there under earth until the end of the wor ...
    Related: century poetry, poetry, wife of bath, queen guinevere, repetition
  • 16th Century Poetry - 1,305 words
    ... o the different social classes that existed, so he wrote in a more indirect approach towards life. Although he did not see the different social classes, by being a Christian and/or Priest, he was likely able to associate with people that he could relate to, such as the ones who did not believe in Christianity or simply did not know. The situations that both authors were in gave both of them an excellent perspective on the characters that they were writing about. Chaucer included characters from all classes except the nobility, which is indicative of the classes he was welcomed into by the participants. The author of Beowulf is dedicated to serving his God and it is acceptable to believe ...
    Related: century poetry, poetry, general prologue, morte darthur, indirect
  • 17th Century Poetry - 543 words
    17Th Century Poetry The seventeenth century was a time of difficult changes and uncertainties. During these chaotic years many poets and philosophers expressed their thoughts and emotions through literature. This paper will briefly describe the seventeenth century and will include quotes and philosophies of poets such as John Donne, John Milton and Richard Lovelace. Life in the seventeenth century can be described as violent. After Queen Elizabeths death, James I, her successor created disorder when he wanted everyone to be Anglican. This soon led to the beheading of his successor, King Charles I. Throughout this century England saw many different rulers and seven civil wars. During the last ...
    Related: century england, century poetry, poetry, seventeenth century, civil wars
  • Aa Rose For Emily By William Faulkner 18971962 Is On Page 56 Of Literature Reading Fiction, Poetry, Drama, And The Essay Seco - 1,125 words
    AA Rose for Emily@ by William Faulkner [1897-1962] is on page 56 of Literature Reading Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and the Essay. Second Edition. Robert DiYanni. Pace University, Pleasantville. McGraw-Hill Publishing Company. 81990, 1986 by McGraw-Hill, Inc. P 56 AWhen Miss Emily Grierson died, our whole town went to her funeral: the men through a sort of respectful affection for a fallen monument, the women mostly out of curiosity to see the inside of her house, which no one save an old manservant - a combined gardener and cook - had seen in at least ten years.@ Emily is a recluse and Faulkner uses dashes to set apart side comments. P 56 AIt was a big, squarish frame house that had once been wh ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, emily grierson, faulkner, literature, miss emily grierson, reading fiction
  • Allen Ginsbergs Poetry - 1,698 words
    Allen Ginsberg's Poetry Themes and Values of the Beat Generation As Expressed in Allen Ginsberg's Poetry Perhaps one of the most well known authors of the Beat Generation is a man we call Allen Ginsberg, who expresses the themes and values in his poetry. He was, in fact, the first Beat Writer to gain popular notice when he delivered a performance of his now famous poem, Howl, in October of 1955. The Beat Generation is typically described as a vision, not an idea and being hard to define. It is characterized as a cultural revolution in process, made by a post-World War II generation of disaffiliated young people...without spiritual values they could honor (Char ...
    Related: allen, allen ginsberg, poetry, post world, vietnam war
  • Animals In Romantic Poetry - 569 words
    Animals In Romantic Poetry Animals in Romantic Poetry Many Romantic poets expressed a fascination with nature in their works. Even more specific than just nature, many poets, such as William Blake, Robert Burns, and Samuel Taylor Coleridge all seemed fascinated with animals. Animals are used as symbols throughout poetry, and are also used to give the reader something to which they can relate. No matter what the purpose, however, animals played a major part in Romantic Poetry. William Blake used animals as basic building blocks for poems such as "The Lamb" and "The Tyger." By using these carefully selected animals to depict good and evil, the reader truly understands Blake's words. All reader ...
    Related: poetry, romantic, romantic poetry, romantic poets, narrative poem
  • Attempts At Poetry Explication - 567 words
    Attempts at Poetry Explication Death, be not proud (P 596) Death, be not proud is the unusual portrayal of Death as a bringer of deliverance "...rest and sleep, which but thy pictures be..." rather than a figure of hell, torment, and punishment, "Rest of their bones, and soul's delivery." through a fourteen-line sonnet (written in iambic pentameter). The speaker emphasizes the inevitability of death through its personification which allots death a more formidable role through characterization. "...we wake eternally..." is an allusion to heaven, accentuating death's role as deliverer rather than a persecutor. As a servant, a deliverer of souls, Death paradoxically dies at the end of the poem ...
    Related: explication, poetry, death be not proud, punishment, lend
  • Blake Poetry - 841 words
    Blake Poetry Verily I say unto you, Whoseover shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child shall in no wise enter therein. [S Luke, 18 (17)] The words are those of Jesus, who was neither unaware of reality, nor indifferent to suffering. The childlike innocence referred to above is a state of purity and not of ignorance. Such is the vision of Blake in his childlike Songs of Innocence. It would be foolish to suppose that the author of ^Holy Thursday^ and ^The Chimney Sweeper^ in Songs of Innocence was insensible to the contemporary social conditions of orphans or young sweeps, and that therefore the poems of the same names in Songs of Experience are somehow apologies or retractions o ...
    Related: blake, poetry, little lamb, kingdom of god, songs
  • Children In Blakes Poetry - 1,160 words
    Children In Blake's Poetry Children in Blake's Poetry The use of children is a prominent theme in a number of William Blake's poems. It is apparent in reading such poems as, "The Lamb," "The Little Black Boy," and "The Chimney Sweeper," that Blake sees the world through the eyes of a child and embraces the innocence of the young. Blake's poem "The Lamb," from Songs of Innocence really illustrates the innocence and purity of a young child. The persona in the poem is of a young child. The child questions the lamb as to where he came from and asks, "Little Lamb who made thee? / Dost thou know who made thee?" (9,10) The child is expecting the Lamb to answer him but it is obvious to the reader th ...
    Related: black children, poetry, william blake, chimney sweeper, little black
  • Death As A Theme In Modern Poetry - 1,603 words
    Death As A Theme In Modern Poetry Death has been and always will be an interesting and compelling topic among poets and authors alike. Death sheds a mysterious vale over life and is often avoided or dreaded within people causing diversity among the reactions of modern poetry and thought. Mortality can be treated as a crisis, a destination, with significance or without, as well as (sadly) by some as a goal. Death provides a wide spectrum of ideas that can be expanded upon with dignity or as a magnanimous ideal. The poets that I have read and pondered deliver an array of insight on the topic; from its grotesqueness to its humbleness. They approach or meditate upon death with disgust as well as ...
    Related: death and dying, poetry, the narrator, dylan thomas, encounter
  • Gillian Clark And The Subject Matter Of Her Poetry - 696 words
    Gillian Clark And The Subject Matter Of Her Poetry Gillian Clarke is obviously a poet of her locality - Wales, and she also writes in her poems of what it's like to be a woman. In this essay I intend to show whether or not her awareness of this affects the subject matter of her poetry. Gillian Clarke being a woman might affect the subject matter of her poetry, because in the poem: Letter from a far country, Gillian Clarke undoubtedly uses the idea of what its like to be a woman to get her point across. She says in her poem that basically women do great things but these are not always appreciated my males, because men do not see these tasks as being great. Clarke for instance obviously believ ...
    Related: clark, gillian, poetry, subject matter, major problem
  • Immortal Poetry - 1,843 words
    Immortal Poetry Annonymous Christopher Marlowe: what did he contribute to English literature and how is his writing reflective of the style of the times? Christopher Marlowe contributed greatly to English literature. He developed a new metre which has become one of the most popular in English literary history, and he revitalised a dying form of English drama. His short life was apparently violent and the m an himself was supposedly of a volatile temperament, yet he managed to write some of the most delicate and beautiful works on record. His writing is representative of the spirit of the Elizabethan literature in his attitude towards religion, his choice of writing style and in the metre tha ...
    Related: immortal, poetry, elizabethan england, henry v, waste
  • John Donnes Poetry - 259 words
    John Donne's Poetry John Donne's Poetry Style The poetry of John Donne expresses his personal spiritual beliefs. There exists a struggle in his writing with the church and his search spirituality. Donne uses the physical joining of a man and a woman to represent joining with God. Many of his poems describe the process of two people becoming one and ends in an even stronger desire for two to join into one. Even though there may not be any sexual activity occurring with in the body of the poem. This mirrors the churches and also mirrors the divide Donne feels between himself and God. Donne is torn between two faiths and cannot decide which one is the true faith. Donne has to the belief that pe ...
    Related: john donne, poetry, sexual, metaphor
  • Joyce Kilmer And Poetry - 216 words
    Joyce Kilmer And Poetry Joyce Kilmer In Joyce Kilmers, trees", Kilmer uses many different poetry techniques, such as personification, rhythm, and similes. Using certain rhyming words Kilmer was able to give her poem a rhythm. In her poem she uses phrases like "A tree that may in summer wear a nest of robins in her hair"(Kilmer). Having used the words hair and wear give her poem a nice beat. One example of a simile that she uses is "I think that I shall never see a poem as lovely as a tree". Having used a simile, she gives the reader an idea of how great she thinks a tree or anything in general made by God is. Throughout the poem Kilmer uses personification. Creating a feeling that the tree i ...
    Related: joyce, poetry, music, nest
  • Literary Criticisms Of Emily Dickinsons Poetry - 1,348 words
    Literary Criticisms of Emily Dickinson's Poetry -1- Throughout Emily Dickinson's poetry there are three main themes that she addresses: death, love, and nature; as well as the impact of "the word". When discussing these themes she followed her lifestyle and broke away from traditional forms of writing and wrote with an intense energy and complexity never seen before and rarely seen today. She was a rarity not only because of her poetry but because she was one of the first female pioneers into the field of poetry. One of the most fascinating things about Dickinson's poetry is her overwhelming attention to detail, especially her "pin-point" insights on death. In "I've Seen a Dying Eye," by Emi ...
    Related: emily, emily dickinson, poetry, critical essays, men and women
  • Michelangelo Was One Of The Greatest Artists Of All Time He Excelled In Architecture, Sculpture, Painting, Poetry, And Engine - 1,624 words
    Michelangelo was one of the greatest artists of all time. He excelled in architecture, sculpture, painting, poetry, and engineering. He was a true Renaissance man who lived a long emotional life. In painting The Last Judgment, Michelangelo was able to incorporate all that he had learned about the human body. He was able to show the way the body moved, as well as it's displays of unrestrained passion, overwhelming grief, or endless torment. This is what makes The Last Judgment such a unique and exceptional work of art. In the spring of 1534, Michelangelo received a commission from Clement VII to paint The Last Judgment on the altar wall of the Sistine Chapel. He was also commissioned at this ...
    Related: artists, engine, michelangelo, sistine chapel, the chosen
  • Michelangelo Was Pessimistic In His Poetry And An Optimist In His Artwork Michelangelos Artwork Consisted Of Paintings And Sc - 1,472 words
    Michelangelo was pessimistic in his poetry and an optimist in his artwork. Michelangelo's artwork consisted of paintings and sculptures that showed humanity in it's natural state. Michelangelo's poetry was pessimistic in his response to Strazzi even though he was complementing him. Michelangelo's sculpture brought out his optimism. Michelangelo was optimistic in completing The Tomb of Pope Julius II and persevered through it's many revisions trying to complete his vision. Sculpture was Michelangelo's main goal and the love of his life. Since his art portrayed both optimism and pessimism, Michelangelo was in touch with his positive and negative sides, showing that he had a great and stable pe ...
    Related: artwork, consisted, michelangelo, michelangelo buonarroti, optimist, pessimistic, poetry
  • On The Universality Of Poetry - 683 words
    On the Universality of Poetry Like any art form, poetry is considered universal. It ranks with music, dance, and fine arts as a form or process of expressing Man's thoughts and passions. Unlike other art forms, however, poetry -- and in fact literature -- has a peculiar characteristic. As a medium it uses language, and unlike other mediums -- like rocks, paints, beat -- language is not universal, it is cultural. Since culture varies according to geography, time, religion, and gender -- it is without doubt that there are multitudes of different languages. Thus poetry becomes cultural or non-universal in form, a characteristic that confines the production and reception of poetry to people that ...
    Related: poetry, universality, literary works, bhagavad gita, concise
  • Poetry - 690 words
    Poetry POETRY REPORT 1. THE DANCE The song The Dance was written by Country Music star Garth Brooks in 1989. To Garth The Dance has many meanings, such as a love gone bad or life. He really thinks that it is about the loss of the people who gave up their life as an ultimate sacrifice. Some of these people are John F. Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr. I chose this song because it is one of my favorites and the meaning that it gives to the listener. The meaning is that life is better left to live and chance than to miss everything by not do anything or even living. Throughout the song many of the poetic terms are used. The rhyme scheme that is used is that the first verse has no rhyme in it. ...
    Related: poetry, luther king, john f kennedy, edgar allan poe, chorus
  • Poetry Analysis - 848 words
    Poetry Analysis The poem, The Flea by John Donne is perhaps simply the seventeenth centurys version of a commonplace pickup line. However, in todays society it offers a comical and conceivably ingenious if not simply creative method of wooing a fine, honorable lady into your bed. In overview, the poem is set with a young lady and her suitor. Conveniently, just as this gentleman is attempting to convince the object of his affection to sleep with him, a flea comes along and proceeds to bite him. The flea then bites his lady friend and the speaker finds the perfect guise for his argument. He tells the woman that they have already exchanged blood within the little flea, and that an exchange in t ...
    Related: poetry, john donne, seventeenth century, century woman, speaker
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