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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: plant species

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  • Air Pollution - 1,493 words
    ... ures have in fact been rising, and the years from 1987 to 1997 were the warmest ten years on record. Most scientists are reluctant to say that global warming has actually begun because climate naturally varies from year to year and decade to decade, and it takes many years of records to be sure of a fundamental change. There is little disagreement, though, that global warming is on its way. Global warming will have different effects in different regions. A warmed world is expected to have more extreme weather, with more rain during wet periods, longer droughts, and more powerful storms. Although the effects of future climate change are unknown, some predict that exaggerated weather condi ...
    Related: air pollution, pollution, pollution control, lung disease, more effective
  • Biomes Of The World - 1,106 words
    Biomes Of The World A biome, also known as life zones, consists of all plants, animals, and other organisms, as well the physical environment in a particular area. A biome is characterized by its' plant life, climate, and location. The climate and physical features determine the boundaries of a biome. A biome is made up of many different ecosystems. The ecosystems tend to have the same pants and animals as neighboring biomes around the boundaries. The major biomes are the tundra, taiga, tropical rain forest, temperate forests, desert, grassland, savanna, chaparral, and marine. Each biome has it's own characteristics such as the tundra. The tundra is a biome that is located in the Northern He ...
    Related: south africa, polar bear, flowering plants, alaska, trout
  • Cloning - 1,206 words
    Cloning Cloning Twenty-five years ago, scientists thought that cloning was virtually impossible. In the last five years, the science of cloning, has come to realization. What is a clone? A clone is a duplicate - much like a photocopy is a duplicate, or copy, of a document (Kolate, 238). A good example of copies that occur in nature are identical twins, which are duplicates of each other. On a daily basis, molecular geneticists and other scientists use cloning techniques to replicate various genetic materials such as gene segments and cells (Kolate, 238). Recently the cloning of a living life form was brought from the realms of science fiction to reality with the cloning of a sheep named Doll ...
    Related: cloning, human cloning, science fiction, growth hormone, drugs
  • Darwinism - 1,598 words
    Darwinism The question of how man evolved has been pondered since man first stepped foot on this planet. Many great philosophers and explorers have made attempts to try to answer this question. Charles Darwin was one of these people. Darwin led a full life of exploration, and during these adventures, he accumulated much information about evolution. He met many explorers that had various ideas of their own about how man evolved. In discussion with these people, he figured out if what they were telling him was fact or fiction. This helped him to formulate his own theory. Curiosity was aroused in Darwin at a very young age. He was one of those children that are always into things, trying to fin ...
    Related: darwinism, great philosophers, galapagos islands, book of genesis, sheep
  • Desert Tortoises - 967 words
    Desert Tortoises Introduction The desert tortoise is one of the four species of on land tortoises in North America. They are the longest living reptile of the southwestern United States region, living from eighty years up to one hundred years. They are well adapted to living in a highly variable and often harsh environment. On April 2, 1990; the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the desert tortoise as a threatened species. Their populations have been decreasing for many years due to habitat loss and disturbance, collection for pets, raven predation of eggs and juveniles, and a respiratory disease mostly caused by captive tortoises being released into the wild. It is illegal to collect de ...
    Related: desert, north american, northern mexico, southern nevada, shell
  • Everglades Flooding - 787 words
    Everglades Flooding The Everglades: Florida's Dying Natural Wonder Perhaps we take it for granted that our beautiful homeland will be forever changed because of the effects of modern civilizations. The environment, local animals, plants, and neighboring niches are all being affected by a few factors. The insensitivity of humans towards our fellow living creatures has caused the Everglades to shrink dramatically in the last one hundred years. The health of the everglades has been compromised because we as humans need more space to live on, bigger roads, and adventures on which we embark. In the following paragraphs, I will explain one of the most threatening factors to Florida's Everglades, h ...
    Related: everglades, flooding, water conservation, book encyclopedia, fish
  • Freshwater Regions - 1,507 words
    Freshwater Regions Freshwater is defined as having a low salt concentrationusually less than 1%. Plants and animals in freshwater regions are adjusted to the low salt content and would not be able to survive in areas of high salt concentration (i.e, ocean). There are different types of freshwater regions: ponds and lakes, streams and rivers, and wetlands. The following sections describe the characteristics of these three freshwater zones. Ponds and Lakes These regions range in size from just a few square meters to thousands of square kilometers. Scattered throughout the earth, several are remnants from the Pleistocene glaciation. Many ponds are seasonal, lasting just a couple of months (such ...
    Related: freshwater, plant species, barrier reef, sea anemones, crucial
  • Hopewell Culture - 1,813 words
    Hopewell Culture Studied since the discovery of the conspicuous mounds in Ross County Ohio, the Hopewell have been an archaeological enigma to many. The tradition is so named for the owner of the farm, Captain Hopewell, where over thirty mounds were discovered. Earlier studies focused more on the exotic grave goods such as precious metals, freshwater pearls, many of these objects had come from all corners of the continent from the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of Mexico, and north to the mid-Atlantic coastline (some say Hopewellian influence reached Nova Scotia). Earlier scholars of the Hopewell (1950s through 1960s) were well aware of the influence of the "Interaction Sphere", yet concluded t ...
    Related: hopewell, food sources, technological innovation, north america, harbor
  • Jurassic Park - 653 words
    Jurassic Park A stormy night, off the coast of Costa Rica, a young man is admitted into a hospital with a wound caused by a small, reptilian animal. He is diagnosed with severe nausea and some sort of blood poisoning. The man dies leaving the doctors with a problem of deciphering the origin of the disease and what it is. On the same island, approximately 20 miles north, a family is taking a vacation from their normal life in the city. Among these people, is a young girl with a knack for drawing and curiosity for animal life. This young girl believes that her family will spot a sloth, which is the only mammal left on her list of animals to see. As she wanders off she stumbles upon a small liz ...
    Related: jurassic, jurassic park, park, plant species, the girl
  • Karen Hesse An American Author - 663 words
    Karen Hesse; An American Author A Look at the Life of Karen Hesse As children, we all had magnificent dreams and aspirations. Whether they were to walk on the moon or to discover a new plant species, dreams were the things that kept us going; kept us striving towards obtaining what we wanted. For Karen Hesse, many dreams came and went throughout her life, but the idea of becoming a published author was always instilled in her mind. Karen Hesse was born August 29, 1952 and was raised in Baltimore, Maryland. Not much is mentioned about her childhood or her family, but one source states that Hesse basically enjoyed participating in normal childhood activities such as catching lightning bugs, ta ...
    Related: american, american author, hesse, karen, health care
  • Life Is Changing - 1,156 words
    Life is Changing Global warming is the most urgent environmental problem the world is facing. Few, if any, trends are more important to our future than climate change caused by human activities. This change is not beneficial. This warming trend occurring because of the buildup of greenhouse gases - primarily carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide- which is a direct result of humans and the Industrial Revolution (EPA, 2000). These gasses are emitted profusely into the atmosphere by factories, cars, and many other devices. As the sun's rays hit the Earth's surface and bounce off, the gasses trap the heat. This creates the rise in temperature. These warming temperatures have many negative e ...
    Related: climate change, industrial revolution, human health, ohio, naturally
  • Ozone Layer Depletion - 1,142 words
    Ozone Layer Depletion The Potential Effects of a Depleted Ozone Layer And God said, let there be light and there was light and then God saw the light, that it was good ( Genesis 1: 3-4 ). Undoubtedly, light is good. Without light man could not survive. Light is the ultimate cosmic force in this universe allowing man to progress and flourish. In the form of heat, light from the sun warms the Earth. Light, also, is the single most important factor influencing the growth and development of plants. Photosynthesis, a process by which plants incorporate light from the sun, allow plants to botanically grow and survive. Certain forms of light are harmful and thus can be said are 'bad'. A natural umb ...
    Related: depletion, layer, ozone, ozone depletion, ozone layer
  • Phytoremediation - 1,687 words
    Phytoremediation Introduction: In recent years it has become clear that some environmental chemicals can cause risks to the developing embryo and fetus. Evaluating the developmental toxicity of environmental chemicals is now a prominent public health concern. The suspected association between TCE and congenital cardiac malformations warrants special attention because TCE is a common drinking water contaminant that is detected in water supplies throughout the U.S. and the world. There is a lot of concern about the clean up of toxic pollutants from the environment. Traditional methods for cleaning up contaminated sites such as dig and haul, pump and treat, soil venting, air sparging and others ...
    Related: waste disposal, case studies, traditional methods, petroleum, polishing
  • Plants Importance For Health - 1,862 words
    Plants Importance For Health Plants are the basis of the food pyramid for all living things, even other plants. They have always been very important to people, not only for food, but also for clothing, weapons, tools, dyes, medicines, shelter and a great many other purposes. Both humans and animals benefit from plants. We eat many different types of plants such as fruits and vegetables. We also use plants for our herbs. Plants are also used to manufacture many different products such as shampoos, rubber, paper, and camera film. In some countries, fermented sugar cane is used instead of gasoline. Animals use plants in many different ways also. They eat many fruits and other plants. Many anima ...
    Related: flowering plants, health, plant species, food pyramid, carbon dioxide
  • Population - 1,525 words
    ... ough food for humans.. Farmers of the past, present and the future have and will continue to prove these assumptions wrong. Farming is the elemant that has been keeping the assumpation wrong. Farming has been around since the 8000 B.C perhaps one of the most important inventions ever made. Without farming the world would not be able to reach the present size of the human population and the for seen future. Someone must feed the hungry, with each individual requiring about 2 200 calouries per day. Farming brings food to dinner tables and is what helps us to grow. It allows humans to grow and get taught new methods of technology to aid society in the future. In the 1940's an acre of plante ...
    Related: human population, population control, population growth, food production, yellow fever
  • Population Growth - 1,169 words
    Population Growth POPULATION GROWTH We are in grave , grave trouble. There are 3,6 billion human beings on the face of the Earth.According to our best estimates, there are somewhere between three and seven times more people than this planet can possibly maintain over a long period of time. Non-renewable resources are being exhausted at a horrendous rate, and we are destroying the capability of the planetary ecosystem to renew the supply of renewable resources. (Hinrichs,8) The worse however is yet to come.here are some numerical data that are present in John Laffins The Hunger to Come: About 2050 the population will be 15.000 million, a century later 82.000 million and by 2350 a frightening ...
    Related: economic growth, human population, population explosion, population growth, urban population, world population
  • Rhododendron - 645 words
    Rhododendron Rhododendron The plant rhododendron belongs to the family Ericaceae which also includes the Heath, and there are about eight-hundred fifty species which grow worldwide (Turner and Szczawinski, 171-2). The Heath family is a large one with so many species, all of the poisonous species fall into two of its subfamilies, one of which is the rhododendron. These cultivated plants occur naturally in temperate regions of the northern hemisphere and in the mountains of Southeast Asia. They are located in the Himalayas with seven-hundred species, southwest China, Burma, and in New Guinea with over three-hundred species (Turner and szczawinski, 172). It has been popular as ornaments in gard ...
    Related: plant species, north america, blood pressure, freeway, poison
  • Species Preservation - 1,639 words
    Species Preservation One issue that has been a controversy is the preservation of endangered species. Ever since the 1960's, scientists have been fighting for laws and acts to protect animals and plants in keeping them in good health and their populations high in numbers. The problem is animals and plants are having trouble surviving in today's world which leads them to be classified as endangered or threatened. Endangered, meaning animals or plants with little population that the species could soon become extinct and threatened is less severe and basically just means that they are close to becoming endangered. By species becoming endangered, this affects our habitat's biodiversity. Today, h ...
    Related: endangered species, foreign species, native species, plant species, preservation, species
  • The Applications Of Technology In The First Decade Of The Twentyfirst Century - 1,500 words
    The Applications of Technology in the First Decade of the Twenty-First Century The Applications of Technology in the First Decade of the Twenty-First Century A quote I heard many times when I was in high school and which I now know traces back to Sir Francis Bacon, one of our earliest scientist or philosophers as they were then called, is the statement "Knowledge Is Power." Today, I believe that the fuller, more correct statement is to say, "the application of knowledge is power." The study of science, and technology subjects will broader our opportunities in life. As we continue to advance to the 21st century- now lesser than 30 days away-we are well aware that technology is possibly the ho ...
    Related: decade, first century, next decade, science and technology, technology, twenty-first century
  • The Greenhouse Effect - 1,125 words
    ... ffect worldwide temperatures dramatically. In 100 years time the average temperature for most parts of the world will increase from between 2 degrees C to 6 degrees C if greenhouse pollution continues at its present rate. (Baines, p. 190) This temperature increase would drastically affect the growth of many different crops and cause the polar ice caps to melt, thus increasing sea levels. If this rise in sea level was to occur many areas would be much more prone to flooding, and generally much deeper floods would be experienced than nowadays. This flooding would happen particularly around coastal regions worldwide, and also along many rivers that flow to or from coastal inlets. The greenh ...
    Related: greenhouse, greenhouse effect, greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, plant species
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