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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: piracy

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  • Bbs Piracy And The Copyright - 1,080 words
    BBS Piracy And The Copyright Recently, The Toronto Star published an article entitled RCMP seizes BBS, piracy charges pending. The RCMP have possessed all computer components belonging to the "90 North" bulletin board system in Montreal, Quebec. The board is accused of allowing end-users the opportunity to download (get) commercial and beta (not marketed, test) software. After a four month investigation, the RCMP seized ten micro-computers and seven modems. In addition, they found software applications of major corporations valued at a sum of approximately $25,000.00 (It is estimated that $200 million dollars are lost in revenues from software piracy, according to the Canadian Alliance Again ...
    Related: copyright, piracy, software piracy, toronto star, point of view
  • Computer Piracy - 542 words
    Computer Piracy Computer piracy is when software gets copied without permission from the copyright holder. This means that the copyright holder (usually the one who makes the software) will not get any reward for his/her product. It is illegal to infringe the copyright law and can result in imprisonment and/or fines. There are five types of software piracy. These include: softlifting, hard disk loading, renting, downloading, and software counterfeiting. Softlifting is when someone buys a single licensed copy of the software and loads it on several computers, contrary to the license. So if the program is loaded into friends and co-workers computers there will be a breach of the copyright. An ...
    Related: computer piracy, computer software, personal computer, piracy, software piracy
  • Modern Piracy With A Breif History - 1,029 words
    Modern Piracy With A Breif History Modern Piracy With A Breif History Piracy is usually determined as a seizure of property (ship, airplane or software) that holds no commission from the owner ("Piracy" 1). It is mostly linked to the dirty, bearded men that sailed the seven seas and robed merchant ships or ships that carried a valuable cargo. This however, was not the case in the late eighties and is definitely not the case today in the nineties. Now software pirates copy software without the permission of the company for their own personal benefits. Since piracy interrupts trade between nations it has been considered to be an offense against international law ("Piracy" 1). While the pirates ...
    Related: breif, history, piracy, software piracy, international law
  • Modern Piracy With A Breif History - 989 words
    ... This shows how fast a copy of software program can spread and a companys profit is lost. A friend copies a game from a friend who got it off a pirate bulletin board. This friend then copies the game to the entire computer-owning friends of his and so forth. If all this goes well, you can have 150 copies around a small city or town in a week. This adds up to about $7500 a week in a small city; small companies just cannot afford to lose that much profit per city, at that rate. Currently software companies are trying to rid the world of software piracy, but the problem is vast and cannot be resolved in a day and a night. Even if it was solved, the question remains would it be for the good o ...
    Related: breif, history, piracy, software piracy, multimedia encyclopedia
  • Mp Piracy - 1,064 words
    Mp3 Piracy In this digital world, the idea of obtaining any materialistic pleasures with a computer is simply amazing to me. It initiates an already growing problem with scarcity and unlimited wants. The fact that everyone with a computer could have free music all the time is quite appealing? Of course, as with anything else, there are limits to what enjoyment we can have by suggesting that we are being morally judged. This seems to be the hidden question behind all the other piracy-related jargon. MP3 piracy and the moral fibers that bind us together are changing our lives right in front of us, while technology is bringing us closer realizing it. Those who produce intellectual property and ...
    Related: piracy, copyright protection, music industry, international federation, stein
  • Software Piracy - 743 words
    Software Piracy Software Piracy - Are We Doing Enough? Introduction Imagine that a person offered to break into a software store, turn off all the alarms, and hold the doors open, and allow you to take whatever you wanted from the store. This situation is faced by most computer owners everyday, not necessarily in this form, but in the form of software piracy. Software piracy is the unauthorised duplication and or distribution of copyrighted programs. There would only be select group who would not be tempted by the prospect of basically free software, most of those who are offered these kind of goods either accept them, or are unaware that they are not legitimate. No matter how this crime is ...
    Related: free software, piracy, pirated software, software, software piracy
  • Teenage Piracy - 473 words
    Teenage Piracy How does teenage piracy counteract with society? Is it flawless or does our society bring these young minds out of our world and label them as outcasts? Is there a reason why these kids are this way? I this essay it will be discussed in what manner teenage piracy, vulgarly known as hacking, affects the minds and the bodies of the young adults and how we as parents and leaders should treat this disease. A kid can get introduced to the world of hacking at a very early age. Usually this is brought to them because they are socially deprived and/or not very friendly. Hackers usually live alone, away from this world, in a world of their own in which they decide how far and how much ...
    Related: piracy, teenage, real world, human beings, camping
  • The Viking Age Has Long Been Associated With Unbridled Piracy, - 1,639 words
    The Viking age has long been associated with unbridled piracy, when freebooters swarmed out of the northlands in their longships to burn and pillage their way across civilized Europe. Modern scholarship provides evidence this is a gross simplification, and that during this period much progress was achieved in terms of Scandinavian art and craftsmanship, marine technology, exploration, and the development of commerce. It seems the Vikings did as much trading as they did raiding. The title "Viking" encompasses a wide designation of Nordic people; Danes, Swedes, and Norwegians, who lived during a period of brisk Scandinavian expansion in the middle ages, from approximately 800 to 1100 AD. This ...
    Related: viking, waste disposal, middle ages, north america, arabesque
  • Title Of Paper : Software Piracy : A Worldwide Problem - 1,070 words
    Title of Paper : Software Piracy : A Worldwide Problem Grade Received on Report : 98 Software Piracy: A Worldwide Problem Software piracy is defined as the illegal copying of software for commercial or personal gain. Software companies have tried many methods to prevent piracy, with varying degrees of success. Several agencies like the Software Publishers Association and the Business Software Alliance have been formed to combat both worldwide and domestic piracy. Software piracy is an unresolved, worldwide problem, costing millions of dollars in lost revenue. Software companies have used many different copy protection schemes. The most annoying form of copy protection is the use of a key dis ...
    Related: business software, computer software, piracy, software, software piracy, worldwide
  • Title Of Paper : Software Piracy : A Worldwide Problem - 1,016 words
    ... ributed in order to speed economic development (Weisband 30). The Software Publishers Association and its sister company the Business Software Alliance have succeeded where the US government has failed. The SPA handles cases in the US, while the BSA works in over thirty foreign countries. In cooperation with local law enforcement, these two organizations have attacked individual companies with moderate success (Weisband 31). The toughest obstacle the BSA faces is trying to get local governments to make copyright laws and to get local law enforcement to cooperate in investigations. The BSA has to rely on diplomatic threats in countries like China and Thailand where the governments are tot ...
    Related: business software, piracy, pirated software, software, software piracy, worldwide
  • Boundaries Of Ownership - 2,946 words
    ... Court decision in an earlier case. Blackmun, treading carefully along a fine line between the different kinds of rights accorded to different kinds of owners, stresses that infringement of copyright does not easily equate with theft, conversion or fraud. . . . The infringer invades a statutorily defined province guaranteed to the copyright holder alone. But he does not assume physical control over the copyright; nor does he wholly deprive its owner of its use. While one may colloquially liken infringement with some general notion of wrongful appropriation, infringement plainly implicates a more complex set of property interests than does run-of-the-mill theft, conversion or fraud. Howeve ...
    Related: ownership, technological tools, more important, personal financial, tech
  • Canadas Copyright Laws - 858 words
    Canada's Copyright Laws Canada's copyright law is one of our hardest laws to enforce. The reason the police have so much trouble enforcing this law, is due to technology. This law is very easy to break, and once broken, it is very hard to track down violators. So although some form of a copyright law is needed, the one we have has, too many holes to be effective. There are three main ways in which the copyright law is broken in everyday life. They is audio/video tape copying, plagiarism, and software piracy. The first, and most commonly violated aspect of the copyright law, is the copying of audio tapes for oneself and friends. Thanks to the invention of dual cassette stereos, this has becom ...
    Related: copyright, copyright laws, computer piracy, software piracy, cracker
  • Charles V - 2,533 words
    ... fided to a bureau of commerce (casa de contratacion) in Seville; but at the same time he established in Spain a special political Council of the Indies. In the colonies two viceroyalties and twenty-nine governments, four archbishoprics, and twenty-four bishoprics were gradually organized. Already of all those great problems had arisen which still vex colonial politics - the question, how far the mother country should monopolize the products of the colonies; the question colonization; the question of the treatment of the natives, doubly difficult because on the one hand their labour was indispensable and on the other it was most unwilling; the question, how Christianity and civilization m ...
    Related: charles v, the duke, spanish crown, north african, masses
  • Computer Crime - 811 words
    Computer Crime Sforza-1 John Sforza Miss. Hilleman English 10R December 7, 1999 Computer Crime Computer crime is defined as a criminal act that has been committed With a computer as the principle tool(Judson, 30). These computer criminals are people with advanced knowledge of operating systems, phone systems, and other computer related devices. Some computer criminals break into other people's computers, and steal data, these criminals are known as hackers. Yet others might make a phone call without even paying for it, or receive phone services that they did not pay for, these people are known as phreakers. And yet there are other computer criminals that illegally copy software, these crimin ...
    Related: computer crime, computer games, crime, pirated software, russian government
  • Computer Crime - 1,151 words
    Computer Crime In todays society our most valuable commodity is not grain, steel or even technology; it is information. Because of computer networks, just about everyone can now access an astounding range of information. The Internet is international, even though 80 percent of the Internet use occurs in the United States, and a staggering amount of information on every subject imaginable is available for free. Because so many people now have access, computer crimes have become more frequent. Everyone with a computer and a modem can commit a computer crime if so inclined. Anyone, conceivably, could become a "white collar" computer criminal. When the term "white collar" crime came into wide sp ...
    Related: collar crime, computer crime, computer networks, computer security, computer systems, crime, violent crime
  • Computer Crime - 867 words
    Computer Crime Computer crime is a very broad term. It could mean anything from a total invasion by a hacker into the federal government or just the simple fact of one person letting another borrow a copy of his favorite flying game. Computers are defined in the dictionary as a machine that computes (WBD vol. 23). But to most people it is a machine that's helps us do a task easier. As we move into the 21th century though one thing is for sure, the computer will help crime become more prevalent. Hackers are probably one of the more common threats out there. These are the people who use modems and telephone lines to enter your computer. A teenager sits across the table yelling, "I want this an ...
    Related: computer crime, computer piracy, computer security, computer system, computer viruses, crime
  • Computer Crimes - 1,159 words
    Computer Crimes Computer crime started in the early 1970s and has become more and more prevalent. Some computer crime are committed by outside individuals that hack into a computer system. These are the people that usually steal data and cause data loss by vandalism. The most common kind of computer crime is espionage committed by people who work for a company, but this is also the one that you rarely hear about. They usually enter false data that will end up making money for them. Hackers are the worlds new bread of criminals and will soon pose a major threat to the U.S. Because America has become largely a computer society everyone is at risk, experts say, and should protect information ab ...
    Related: computer crime, computer system, computer virus, crime data, exchange commission
  • Computer Crimes On The Internet - 1,436 words
    Computer Crimes on the Internet Thesis: Emerging with the Internet, a group of elite cyber-surfers have turned into todays computer hackers. Software piracy is a major crime on the Net. $7.5 billion of American Software is stolen each year. Industrial Espionage is gaining access to remote sites illegally. Stealing of information from corporate sites is extremely illegal. Password Sniffers are used to get someones password. IP spoofers changes your identity. Many things can be stolen from companies. III. Email hacking is common. Mail bombs are thousands of messages send to a single address. Email forgery can cause people reputations to get ruined. Anonymous Email is illegal. Fraud is very com ...
    Related: computer crime, computer viruses, internet access, internet protocol, internet service, internet service provider, internet works
  • Copyright And Patent Fraud - 1,440 words
    Copyright and Patent Fraud by David Lee Roth 12th hon. Government Mr. Pibb January 5, 1998 Roth 1 Today, more than ever before, products, goods, and services are being provided by businesses of all variations. Fewer and fewer people today are self-sufficient. Practically no one today makes his or her own clothes, and some people do not even prepare their own meals. Today's business world and modern day technology make it possible for people to obtain almost anything and everything they need or want, provided they have the money to buy it. There are gardening, music, painting, moving, clothing, and countless other businesses all around the world. Undoubtedly, there is a business for practical ...
    Related: copyright, fraud, patent, organized crime, personal care
  • Copyright And Patent Fraud - 1,429 words
    ... became involved in this lawsuit with a motorcycle parts and repair shop called the Hog Farm in San Jose, California, in 1991. The Hog Farm owners argued that a hog referred to any large motorcycle. In this case, Harley-Davidson filed for a trademark of the nickname hog, and was able to win the case. (Fritz 30) An article in the Los Angeles Times reports that on July 5th, 1995, Federal agents raided a stuffy yellow warehouse in downtown Los Angeles, where twelve men were cheating the Chanel Clothing Company of large profits. These few men make money by copying Chanel's crossed C logo and selling the fake product with a 500-per cent markup. (Simon A1) Most counterfeiting products tend to ...
    Related: copyright, copyright infringement, fraud, patent, patent laws, patent office, united states patent
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