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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: pierre

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  • More Than Hundred Years Passed Since Marie And Pierre Curie Won The Nobel Prize For Discovering Radioactive Elements Polonium - 724 words
    More than hundred years passed since Marie and Pierre Curie won the Nobel Prize for discovering radioactive elements polonium and radium. The scientific world was excited with the newly discovered force of nature, but they soon realized that that the discovery was not the best for human race. They soon learned that the great discovery was a threat to health. Unfortunately, long time went by until their concerns were taken seriously. Marie Curie denied that radiation was bad for health even though everyone around her, who was exposed to radiation, was dyeing from leukemia. She never fully acknowledged that her work had ruined her health Marie curie herself was chronically ill and nearly blind ...
    Related: curie, discovering, marie, marie curie, nobel, nobel prize, pierre
  • Pierre De Fermat - 863 words
    Pierre De Fermat Pierre de Fermat Pierre de Fermat was born in the year 1601 in Beaumont-de-Lomages, France. Mr. Fermat's education began in 1631. He was home schooled. Mr. Fermat was a single man through his life. Pierre de Fermat, like many mathematicians of the early 17th century, found solutions to the four major problems that created a form of math called calculus. Before Sir Isaac Newton was even born, Fermat found a method for finding the tangent to a curve. He tried different ways in math to improve the system. This was his occupation. Mr. Fermat was a good scholar, and amused himself by restoring the work of Apollonius on plane loci. Mr. Fermat published only a few papers in his lif ...
    Related: fermat, pierre, different ways, blaise pascal, loose
  • Pierre De Fermat - 843 words
    Pierre De Fermat Pierre de Fermat Pierre de Fermat was born in the year 1601 in Beaumont-de-Lomages, France. Mr. Fermat's education began in 1631. He was home schooled. Mr. Fermat was a single man through his life. Pierre de Fermat, like many mathematicians of the early 17th century, found solutions to the four major problems that created a form of math called calculus. Before Sir Isaac Newton was even born, Fermat found a method for finding the tangent to a curve. He tried different ways in math to improve the system. This was his occupation. Mr. Fermat was a good scholar, and amused himself by restoring the work of Apollonius on plane loci. Mr. Fermat published only a few papers in his lif ...
    Related: fermat, pierre, isaac newton, french philosopher, corollary
  • Pierre Elliot Trudeaus Federalism And The French Canadians - 1,815 words
    Pierre Elliot Trudeau's Federalism and the French Canadians Published in 1968, Federalism and the French Canadians is an ideological anthology featuring a series of essays written by Pierre Elliot Trudeau during his time spent with the Federal Liberal party of Canada. The emphasis of the book deals with the problems and conflicts facing the country during the Duplessis regime in Quebec. While Trudeau stresses his adamant convictions on Anglophone/Francophone relations and struggles for equality in a confederated land, he also elaborates on his own ideological views pertaining to Federalism and Nationalism. The reader is introduced to several essays that discuss Provincial legislature and con ...
    Related: canadian government, elliot, federalism, french canadians, pierre
  • Pierre Ronsard - 735 words
    Pierre Ronsard "Il Faut Laisser Maisons..." is a poem written by Pierre Ronsard and published in the book Derniers vers de Pierre de Ronsard in 1586. This poems central idea is that the spirit is more important than the body, because the spirit has far fewer limits than the body. As soon as one dies, the spirit is free from the bonds of the body. These lines: "Laissant pourir a-bas sa dpouille de boue" and "Franc des liens du corps, pour ntre quun esprit." show that Ronsard succeeds in establishing the theme by making it clear that it is necessary to leave the possessions of this world and material things to become a spirit. Ronsard is the speaker of the poem which takes place late in his li ...
    Related: pierre, human nature, personal experience, rhyme scheme, poems
  • Pierre Trudeau, Former Prime Minister Of Canada, Was Once Described As A French Canadian Proud Of His Identity And Culture, Y - 1,562 words
    Pierre Trudeau, former Prime Minister of Canada, was once described as "A French Canadian proud of his identity and culture, yet a biting critic of French-Canadian society, determined to destroy its mythology and illusions". He has also been identified as "A staunch, upholder of provincial autonomy holding the justice portfolio in the federal government". Such cumulative appraisal and observation made by past fellow bureaucrat provides high testimonial for the ex-Democratic Socialist. This critique will establish and dispute the prime directives that Trudeau had advocated in his own book written during the years 1965 to 1967. The compilation of political essays featured in his book deal with ...
    Related: canadian, canadian government, canadian history, canadian politics, canadian society, french canadian, french canadians
  • Race: Pierre Van Den Berghe - 592 words
    Race: Pierre Van Den Berghe When we look at physical characteristics such as skin color from the social definition perspective, there is no clear meaning, but these characteristics do have what is referred to as social meaning. Pierre van den Berghe defined a racial group as a "human group that defines itself and/or is defined by other groups as different from other groups by virtue of innate and immutable physical characteristics" (8). Racial group distinctions are based upon ideological racism, which links physical qualities to the lesser or greater cultural and intellectual characteristics. Originating more than one hundred years ago, people with only one-eighth African ancestry, but even ...
    Related: pierre, national origin, physical characteristics, racial discrimination, sociology
  • 65279 - 969 words
    WAR OF 1812 In this essay I will be discussing the major events and battles that took place during the War of 1812. The war was a conflict fought between the United States and Great Britain. It started in 1812 and lasted until the spring of 1815. My thesis statement is: The War of 1812 was a war that neither side won. There were four main causes for the war taking place. These were impressment, boundary problems, the Warhawks, and the British supplying the Ohio Country Indians with weapons and supplies. Henry Clay, who was the leader of the Warhawks, convinced Americans that defeating British North America, "is only a matter of marching." He knew that Britain wouldnt have any troops to spare ...
    Related: war of 1812, microsoft encarta, william henry harrison, naval, canadian
  • Alec Guinness - 1,318 words
    Alec Guinness Alec Guinness writes My Name Escapes Me - The Diary of a Retiring Actor - in purpose of documentation of his performance to commit his story to the public record. In the diary, Alec Guinness, at 82, shows his wishes to spend his declining years as, "a retiring actor"; he has not done with acting; he is still performing; yet retiring. This time his performance is committed to words in the commissioned diary. I see a diary as documentation of one's life, especially when it is to be shown to public. By definition, a document is a"formal paper bearing important or official information". In the same sense, Alec Guinnesss diary is a document of his "act" of writing as Paul Matthew Pi ...
    Related: alec, guinness, social issues, different ways, screen
  • Anarchy - 1,645 words
    Anarchy Anarchism seems to be defined many ways by many different sources. Most dictionary definitions define anarchism as the absence of government. A leading modern dictionary, Webster's Third International Dictionary, defines anarchism briefly but accurately as, "a political theory opposed to all forms of government and governmental restraint and advocating voluntary cooperation and free association of individuals and groups in order to satisfy their needs." Other dictionaries describe anarchism with similar definitions. The Britannica-Webster dictionary defines the word anarchism as, "a political theory that holds all government authority to be unnecessary and undesirable and advocates a ...
    Related: anarchy, william godwin, working class, utopian society, empower
  • Anarchy - 718 words
    Anarchy Anarchy, coming from the greek term meaning "without government", is the political theory that society does not need a government to run the country or any governmental fundings (although robbing them of what they robbed us wouldn't hurt). Many people believe that anarchy is a horrible and impossible way of living, stating that anarchism would leave us vulnerable to criminals and terrorists. This may be because of the terroristic methods that anarchists have taken to reach their ultimate goal. The terroristic anarchism movement came under the leadership of Mikhail Bakunin in the 1800's, and have continued with most individual anarchists and anarchist groups. I admit, there are some v ...
    Related: anarchy, mikhail bakunin, american government, political theory, constitution
  • Ancient Egyptian Medicine - 1,065 words
    ... le from the Fourth Dynasty that indicates that there was an attempt to drill a hole in one of the teeth. Possibly the first prosthesis was found in 1929 in Giza where two teeth were found with gold wire fixed to the teeth. Also they have found several mummies with artificial teeth. The study of several mummies indicates poor teeth condition. This can be attributed to the lack of nutrition, mostly lower class citizens. In the Papyrus Ebers, they found parts of a dental monograph titled "The Beginning of Remedies for Stronger Teeth." Carious teeth were treated with a mixture of ocher, flour, spelt, and honey. Fillings were made out of a combination of malachite and resin. The Ancient Egypt ...
    Related: ancient egyptians, egyptian, medicine, modern medicine, lower class
  • Ancient Maya - 947 words
    Ancient Maya Maya The ancient Maya were a group of American Indian peoples who lived in Southern Mexico. Their descendants, the modern Maya,live in the same regions today. Agriculture was the basis of the economy of the Mayan and corn was the principal food.(Voorhies 324) Other crops included avocados, tomatoes, and chili peppers. They cultivated an enormous variety of plants.(Foley 20) In hieroglyphic writing, astronomy, and mathematics, the Mayan Indians were far ahead of any other people in the New World.(Foley 20) The Mayan invented a solar civil calendar including three hundred sixty- five days.(Ivanoff 86) The accuracy of the Mayan calculations is all the more extraordinary in view of ...
    Related: ancient artifacts, ancient maya, classic maya, maya, musical instruments
  • Ancient Olympics - 1,392 words
    ... e athlete could grip it. Varying in weight, their main purpose was to increase the length of the jump. On one side of the fifty foot jumping pit, there was a fixed point called the bater. This was a point from where all jumps were measured. By swinging the halteres and getting a running start, the athlete would then jump and hold onto the weights until the end of his flight, then throw them backwards. He then came down onto the soil with his feet together, with his jumped being measured with a wooden rod called a kanon. A good jumper needed quick acceleration within the limited runway. Coordination and power was essential in using the bater for proper spring in their jump. It all had to ...
    Related: ancient greece, olympics, true meaning, vice versa, agility
  • Anorexia Nervosa - 1,013 words
    Anorexia Nervosa Many people suffer from the condition known as anorexia nervosa. Often the victims go through a number of symptoms that can lead to a serious amount of problems concerning a persons weight, happiness, and personality. People should keep a close eye out for anyone who shows signs of certain symptoms that become present later on in the future. What is Anorexia Nervosa? In medicine, Anorexia Nervosa is a condition characterized by an intense fear of gaining weight or becoming obese, along with a distorted body image, which leads to excessive weight loss from restricting food intake and exercising excessively. It is essentially self-starvation leading to a loss of body weight 15 ...
    Related: anorexia, anorexia nervosa, nervosa, eating disorder, warning signs
  • Anorexia: A Problem We All Must Face - 1,569 words
    ... and mental health problems and their development usually have a number of different contributing and perpetuating factors, as stated by organizations around the world dedicated to eating disorders. These factors could be any, or a combination of physical, emotional or sexual trauma, cultural emphasis or preoccupation with body image ideals, peer influences, loss and grief, starvation, brain chemistry, purging behaviors, physiological effects of dieting, relationships, stress, coping styles. It is this list that is generally understood universally as the possible causes of all eating disorders, and they apply directly to anorexia. Society plays a role without a doubt, constant pressures s ...
    Related: anxiety disorder, third stage, body image, degradation, plain
  • Antoine Lavoisier 17431794 Antoinelaurent Lavoisier Lah Vwah Zyay Was One Of The - 879 words
    Antoine Lavoisier (1743-1794) Antoine-Laurent Lavoisier (lah vwah ZYAY) was one of the best-known French scientists and was an important government official. His theories of combustion, his development of a way to classify the elements and the first modern textbook of chemistry led to his being known as the father of modern chemistry. He contributed to much of the research in the field of chemistry. He is quoted for saying, Nothing is lost, nothing is created, everything is transformed. Lavoisier was born in Paris, France on Aug. 26, 1743. When he was eleven years old he attended a college called Mazain. For Lavoisier's last two years in college he found a great deal of interest in science. ...
    Related: antoine, antoine lavoisier, lavoisier, paris france, french academy
  • Arab Nationalism - 1,081 words
    Arab Nationalism HARVEY: The global march against child labor was born in a conversation that I had with Kailash Satyarthi-- the very charismatic leader of the move to bring children out of bonded labor in India-- the head of the South Asian Coalition on Child Servitude. KAILASH: We have ample proof that the children are being used as slaves. They are bought and sold. They are tortured. They are confined to workplace. They are not able to leave their jobs. HARVEY: These are kids working in brick kilns, working in farms as a part of bonded farm labor, working in granite quarries; kids in sexual slavery, or being trafficked across national or state boundaries for sexual purposes. Those are the ...
    Related: arab, nationalism, human rights, good thing, track
  • Battle Of Shiloh - 951 words
    Battle Of Shiloh The Battle of Shiloh After taking Fort Donelson, Ulysses Grant had wanted to move on the Confederate base in Corinth, Mississippi, where Albert Sidney Johnston, the Confederate commander in the West, was known to be assembling troops. Grant was ordered to delay his advance until Union General Don Carlos Buell, who had been operating in East Tennessee, could join him. Early on April 6, 1862, Johnston's army, which had come up to the federal lines undetected, struck Grant's army, which was encamped at Pittsburg Landing on the Tennessee River. The Battle of Shiloh followed. Grant's Federal army was not fully prepared for the thousands of screaming rebels who burst out of the wo ...
    Related: battle of shiloh, first battle, shiloh, sunday morning, ulysses grant
  • Beginning Of House Music - 1,254 words
    Beginning Of House Music Early House To trace the origins of todays house music, one needs to time travel back to the 80s, following a bizarre trail that spans the Atlantic ocean, hits the Mediterranean dance floors of Ibiza, sneak into the backdoors of New Yorks recording studios, and have V.I.P. passes to the clubs of Chicago and London. Since we cant deliver any of that, heres a brief retelling of the birth of modern dance music. House musics earliest roots are found in the musical hotspots of Chicago around 1985. Transplanted New York DJ Frankie Knuckles had a regular gig at a club called The Warehouse. Knuckles would tinker with soul and disco tunes by laying down a drum machine-generat ...
    Related: black music, dance music, music, time travel, modern dance
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