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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: physical characteristics

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  • Affirmative Action - 1,025 words
    Affirmative Action The idea that different subcategories of humans exist, and that depending on one's point of view, some subcategories are inherently inferior to others, has been around since ancient times. This concept eventually gained the label of "race" in 1789, a "zoological term... generally defined as a subcategory of a species which inherits certain physical characteristics that distinguish it from other categories of that same species." (Tivnan 181). Although slavery has been by and large eliminated in virtually every part of the modern world, the concept used to rationalize its implementation, "racism", still plagues most modern cultures. Races that were once enslaved, or are mino ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, education system, equal rights, inherently
  • Aggression Biological Theory Vs Behaviorist Theory - 1,254 words
    Aggression - Biological Theory vs Behaviorist Theory Aggression is a problem that affects all members of society. There is no doubt that aggression pays off for some. Parents who yell and threaten punishment get results. The child who hits the hardest gets the toy. The brother who is willing to be the most vicious in a fight wins. The teacher who gives the hardest test and threatens to flunk the most students usually gets the most study time from students. The spouse who threatens to get the maddest gets their way. The male who acts the most macho and aggressive gets the praise of certain groups of males. For decades psychologists have attempted to find the causes of aggression. The focus of ...
    Related: aggression, aggression in children, behaviorist, biological, biological factors
  • American Verna - 1,001 words
    American Verna "The American Verna" Why is that humans were able to practically "take over" their environment and leave all other animal species far behind in the race of survival? Not many would argue that we were able to do so just because we can walk upright and we have unspecialized teeth. In fact, humans are capable of many things that separate us from the animals. Our far most important trait is the ability to analyze and comprehend complex subject matters. From that we can learn, understand and communicate with one another so we could accomplish things as a group, a group which one day became so complex that without structure and laws, chaos would preside. In our times, we see many di ...
    Related: american, american freedom, american system, social mobility, social structures
  • Animal Behavior - 2,263 words
    Animal Behavior Biology lb Abstract Animal behavior is predictable. Their behavioral tendencies are influenced by the relationship of its anatomy to their environment. By observing various forms of life, and associating the mechanism of their abilities to perform a behavioral action, evolutionary influence thereafter, can be analyzed and deduced from that point. Introduction The science and study of animal behavior involve an enormous array of complicated factors. For instance, stereotyped responses are unlearned behavioral reactions to some environmental stimulus predicated upon an organism relationship to its physical environment and anatomy. This obviously begs the question; is the observ ...
    Related: animal behavior, more important, field trip, guinea pig, incredible
  • Anthropologists - 334 words
    Anthropologists Anthropologists trace the origin and evolutionary development of the human race through the study of changing physical characteristics and cultural and social institutions. Anthropological data, including that acquired by archeological techniques, may be applied to solving problems in human relations such as race and ethnic relations and education. People have always been interested in their past history. Although anthropology dates back to Aristotle, it is a commonly accepted fact that it became an established science during the Victorian era or the era of exploration. Anthropology has developed slowly since then with little real development until the 1930's when the use of ...
    Related: anthropologists, human race, subject matter, computer software, software
  • Banning On Cloning Is Unjust - 615 words
    Banning On Cloning Is Unjust! On February 24, 1997, the world was shocked and fascinated by the announcement of Ian Wilmut and his colleagues. A press release stated that they had successfully cloned a sheep from a single cell of an adult sheep. Since then, cloning has become one of the most controversial and widely discussed topics. The issue that gets the greatest focus is human cloning, and there has been an onslaught of protests and people lobbying for a ban on it. However, there is a real danger that prohibitions on cloning will open the door to inappropriate restrictions on accepted medical and genetic practices. Therefore, the banning of cloning is unjust. The most popular objection t ...
    Related: banning, cloning, human cloning, unjust, physical characteristics
  • Barn Burning By Faulkner - 663 words
    Barn Burning By Faulkner In "Barn Burning," Faulkner incorporates several instances of irony. He utilizes this literary tool in order to help the development of his characters and to express his ultimate message to the readers. Some examples of his use of irony are the unintentional yet inevitable ending of the Snopes family time after time, the similarities and differences between Sarty Snopes and his father, and finally, the two distinct purposes for which Abner Snopes uses fire. Separately, each is able to contribute to the development of the two main characters in the short story. Collectively, they are also able to help Faulkner convey his personal message that essentially, an individua ...
    Related: barn, barn burning, burning, faulkner, short story
  • Bigfoot - 667 words
    Bigfoot Bigfoot also known popularly as the Sasquatch, Momo, Skunk Ape, the list goes on and on, is without a doubt, the most famous of all hairy man-like creatures. The following will make you a believer in this overseen creature, it made me one. Bigfoot is seen in every possible location throughout the North American Continent, mountains, swamps, forests, crossing desolate and some not so desolate roadways and on open farmland. While its demeanor varies from docile to curios to almost threatening, its general appearance varies. Bigfoot is a massive animal, its average height is seven and a half feet tall, its weight is said be between 400-500 pounds. It is covered almost completely in fur, ...
    Related: bigfoot, physical characteristics, native americans, north american, associate
  • Black Americans - 1,275 words
    Black Americans Black Americans are those persons in the United States who trace their ancestry to members of the Negroid race in Africa. They have at various times in United States history been referred to as African, coloured, Negro, Afro-American, and African-American, as well as black. The black population of the United States has grown from three-quarters of a million in 1790 to nearly 30 million in 1990. As a percentage of the total population, blacks declined from 19.3 in 1790 to 9.7 in 1930. A modest percentage increase has occurred since that time. Over the past 300 and more years in the United States, considerable racial mixture has taken place between persons of African descent an ...
    Related: african american, afro american, american revolution, black african, united states history
  • Black Panther - 797 words
    Black Panther The Black Panther The black panther is a type of leopard. It belongs to the family Felidae, and is classified as Panthera pardus. Black panthers are found in Africa, Asia Minor, Middle East India, Pakistan, China, Siberia, and Southeast Asia. The male panther is called a panther, a female panther is called a panthress, and an immature panther is called a cub. The physical characteristics of the Black Panther vary. They are covered with black fur, with some darker areas that you can only see in certain lighting. The color of the panther depends on its location. The black panther has a long dark tail to go with its dark body. It has compact muscles and walks with a flowing moveme ...
    Related: black panther, panther, the jungle, asia minor, season
  • Botticellis Women - 948 words
    Botticelli`s Women Botticelli is one of the most famous artists during the Italian Renaissance. He was very well know for the portrayal of the female figure and his ability to incorporate femininity as a symbol of life itself and/or nature illustrated by the changes of seasons. Botticelli most famous figure was that of Venus, the goddess of love. She was incorporated into two of his most famous works, The Birth of Venus and Primavera. Most of Botticellis women had that typical hourglass figure to them . During the time period in which these works were created, women with the physical characteristics of Venus were considered to be the ideal feminine figure. These women were considered to be i ...
    Related: sandro botticelli, new jersey, physical characteristics, renaissance florence, italian
  • Brave New World And 1984 - 1,356 words
    Brave New World And 1984 Imagine a world in which people are produced in factories, a world lost of all freedom and individuality, a world where people are exiled or "disappear" for breaking the mold. Both 1984 by George Orwell and Aldous Huxleys Brave New World are startling depictions of such a society. Although these novels are of fictional worlds, control of the future may be subtly evolving and becoming far worse than Huxley or Orwell could ever have imagined. Each society destroys the freedom of the individual through various controlling methods such as the denial of language and literature, a caste system and conditioning. One way in which each society controls is by limiting the lang ...
    Related: 1984, brave, brave new world, world literature, everyday life
  • Cancer Treatment - 801 words
    Cancer Treatment In recent years Cancer is disease that has seemed to captivate and frighten Americans. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the U.S. with more than 1 million new cases occurring a year. With each day scientific findings aid a better understanding of the causes of the disease. These findings have opened doors to help treat cancer patients more effectively. Scientists have gained a more specific knowledge of individual cancers and now through the wonders of science have found effective treatments for the disease. To treat Cancer doctors and scientist need an understanding of what the disease actually physically does. Cancer is defined as "new growth of tissue resulti ...
    Related: cancer, cancer treatment, most effective, science and technology, accessible
  • Chicken Soup For The Soul - 1,429 words
    Chicken Soup For The Soul Anthropology may be dissected into four main perspectives, firstly physical or biological anthropology, which is an area of study concerned with human evolution and human adaptation. Its main components are human paleontology, the study of our fossil records, and human genetics, which examines the ways in which human beings differ from each other. Also adopted are aspects of human ecology, ethnology, demography, nutrition, and environmental physiology. From the physical anthropologist we learn the capabilities for bearing culture that distinguish us from other species. Secondly archaeology, which follows from physical anthropology, reassembles the evolution of cultu ...
    Related: chicken, soup, social relationships, cultural difference, achieving
  • Cloning Issues - 1,738 words
    Cloning Issues I have observed in my nineteen years of living that almost everyone in this society strives to be the same or like the popular culture. The average person is very materialistic, and strives for an appealing physical appearance. Artificiality is common in the popular culture. For example, dying of hair color, inserting color contacts, getting lyposuction, implants or removal of flaws on the body is prevalent. I strongly oppose human cloning primarily because I believe that humans already try to replicate themselves enough and having the same genes is not necessary. Plus, just because there may be two identical beings doesnt mean that they will behave the same. In this essay wil ...
    Related: cloning, human cloning, endangered species, natural process, morality
  • Computer Crime - 1,151 words
    Computer Crime In todays society our most valuable commodity is not grain, steel or even technology; it is information. Because of computer networks, just about everyone can now access an astounding range of information. The Internet is international, even though 80 percent of the Internet use occurs in the United States, and a staggering amount of information on every subject imaginable is available for free. Because so many people now have access, computer crimes have become more frequent. Everyone with a computer and a modem can commit a computer crime if so inclined. Anyone, conceivably, could become a "white collar" computer criminal. When the term "white collar" crime came into wide sp ...
    Related: collar crime, computer crime, computer networks, computer security, computer systems, crime, violent crime
  • Controversy Of Cloning And Dna - 723 words
    Controversy Of Cloning And Dna Members of Congress: I am writing in reference to the possible upcoming technology of cloning humans and altering DNA tissue makeup of the unborn child. This issue will come before Congress for approval or disapproval in the near future. This technology would allow scientists to alter the tissue of a future infant in regards to physical characteristics such as height, appearance, intelligence, and birth defects. It is disturbing to think that such alteration of DNA could be allowed to pass through Congress as a bill. Cloning and DNA tissue alteration, though there may seem to be positive and worldly aspects, is, in my opinion morally wrong and corrupt according ...
    Related: cloning, controversy, physical characteristics, different ways, limiting
  • Deviant Behavior - 1,188 words
    ... ow much their peers and media influence them to go against the norms. Although, once a person is labeled deviant they continue to respond to society as if they are. This aspect of deviance is called the Labeling Theory. They are sociologists who seek to find why certain acts are defined as criminal, and others are not. They also question how and why certain people become defined as a criminal or deviant. The acts that they perform, in this idea, are not significant to the criminals, but it is the social reaction to them that is (Overview 1). The response and label from other individuals in society, such as peers, are how the individuals view themselves. When a person does a deviant act t ...
    Related: criminal behavior, delinquent behavior, deviant, deviant behavior, york harper
  • Disorders - 1,235 words
    ... to aid in normal development and rehabilitation. Limb deformities and repeated fractures can be corrected by intramedullary rods -- telescoping rods that elongate with growth. After surgical placement of the rods, extensive post- operative care is required because greater amounts of blood and fluid are lost. (Loeb, 755) It should be noted that the healing of fractures appear to be normal. (Isselbacher, 2112) Braces, immobilizing devices and wheelchairs are necessary. Physical therapy is important in the treatment of OI. Bone fracture density in unfractured bone is decreased when compared with age-matched controls due to limited exercise, so it is essential to stay as active as possible. ...
    Related: disorders, genetic disorder, child health, health nursing, helpless
  • Domestic Violence: Theory, Effects Interventions - 2,884 words
    Domestic Violence: Theory, Effects & Interventions The female is, as it were, a mutilated ... a sort of natural deficiency. It is not appropriate in a female character to be manly or clever. The male is by nature superior and the female inferior. Introduction Domestic violence has been present in our society and an accepted practice of many cultures for hundreds of years. Up until the late 1800's, a man in this country had the right to chastise his wife until the practice was declared illegal in two states (Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence Manual, p. B-8). Old English Common Law allowed husbands to beat their wives provided that the stick they used was not thicker than his th ...
    Related: domestic abuse, domestic violence, intervention strategies, battered women, loving husband
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