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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: philosophy of mind

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  • Philosophy Of Mind - 1,237 words
    Philosophy Of Mind In this paper I plan to show that Searle is correct in claiming that his Chinese Room Analogy shows that any Turing machine simulation of human understanding of a linguistic phenomenon fails to possess any real understanding. First I will explain the Chinese Room Analogy and how it is compared to a Turing machine. I will then show that the machine can not literally be said to understand. A Turing machine has a infinite number of internal states, but always begins a computation in the initial state go. Turing machines can be generalized in various ways. For example many machines can be connected, or a single machines may have more than one reader-printer under command of th ...
    Related: philosophy, philosophy of mind, point of view, native english, meaningless
  • Artificial Intelligence - 2,507 words
    Artificial Intelligence Artificial Intelligence is based in the view that the only way to prove you know the mind's causal properties is to build it. In its purest form, AI research seeks to create an automaton possessing human intellectual capabilities and eventually, consciousness. There is no current theory of human consciousness which is widely accepted, yet AI pioneers like Hans Moravec enthusiastically postulate that in the next century, machines will either surpass human intelligence, or human beings will become machines themselves (through a process of scanning the brain into a computer). Those such as Moravec, who see the eventual result as "the universe extending to a single thinki ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, human intelligence, intelligence, philosophical views
  • Artificial Intelligence - 2,507 words
    Artificial Intelligence Artificial Intelligence is based in the view that the only way to prove you know the mind's causal properties is to build it. In its purest form, AI research seeks to create an automaton possessing human intellectual capabilities and eventually, consciousness. There is no current theory of human consciousness which is widely accepted, yet AI pioneers like Hans Moravec enthusiastically postulate that in the next century, machines will either surpass human intelligence, or human beings will become machines themselves (through a process of scanning the brain into a computer). Those such as Moravec, who see the eventual result as "the universe extending to a single thinki ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, human intelligence, intelligence, alan turing
  • Artificial Intelligence - 2,508 words
    Artificial Intelligence Artificial Intelligence is based in the view that the only way to prove you know the mind's causal properties is to build it. In its purest form, AI research seeks to create an automaton possessing human intellectual capabilities and eventually, consciousness. There is no current theory of human consciousness which is widely accepted, yet AI pioneers like Hans Moravec enthusiastically postulate that in the next century, machines will either surpass human intelligence, or human beings will become machines themselves (through a process of scanning the brain into a computer). Those such as Moravec, who see the eventual result as the universe extending to a single thinkin ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, human intelligence, intelligence, carnegie mellon university
  • Artificial Intelligence - 2,478 words
    ... -language, through syntax, that we construct our world. This is the essence of Chomsky's constructivism. So we see that if we are to construct a thinking machine (or for that matter, representations in our mind of a thinking machine) this broad syntax does significantly clarify how to go about designing a computer which can take discourse as input, remember and learn, etc. . .If we realize however the syntactic nature of the minds which create the machine, we can see that it is possible for a machine to think syntactically, or at least that Searle's Chinese Room argument does not stand up, because cognition is not dependent on semantics. Thus, a thinking machine would be a purely syntact ...
    Related: artificial, artificial intelligence, human intelligence, intelligence, human race
  • Computer Intellect - 1,090 words
    ... g to Searle, it has this mind because its brain is complex enough, or in his terms, there is enough water to make it wet (DesAutels Lecture 6-14-00). I would now like to ask, did that bacterial cell have a mind, the one we started with? NO. Did the slug have a mind? NO, it too lacked a brain. Do the cells in a human have a mind? Remember they themselves have no brains, so they cant have mind, but collected together as a whole they do, and the human is attributed with mind. So the question still remains, Can a computer have a mind? It is made up of parts, like the cells that make up a human, and these parts on their own lack mind (like the cogs in a clock. Just as an aside, the clock that ...
    Related: intellect, falls short, technology industry, philosophy of mind, nagel
  • Land Of Desire - 1,128 words
    Land Of Desire Land of Desire: Merchants, Power, and the Rise of a New American Culture William Leach Random House; 1993 428 Pages The transformations that America went through in order to become a capitalist country were very significant and are sometimes looked past. However, in the book Land of Desire, the author, William Leach extensively goes into many of those things. There were many things that went into this ranging from specific poeple and incidents to outside places and things. Leach shows each individual ordeal and explains the personal effect that it had on the industry, as well as how society accepted, or in some cases condemned such things. All of this comes from his own educat ...
    Related: random house, american culture, personal goals, split, reform
  • Mysticism - 4,921 words
    Mysticism In this article I would like to bring the findings of my somewhat unusual but increasingly accepted field mysticism to the discussion, for I think they may offer some helpful insights about consciousness. Why? When a biologist seeks to understand a complex phenomenon, one key strategy is to look to at it in its simplest form. Probably the most famous is the humble bacterium E. coli. Its simple gene structure has allowed us to understand much of the gene functioning of complex species. Similarly many biologists have turned to the memory of the simple sea slug to understand our own more kaleidoscopic memory. Freud and Durkheim both used totemism, which they construed as thesimplest ...
    Related: mysticism, an encounter, nixon administration, transcendental meditation, certainty
  • Other Minds - 1,234 words
    ... enough, but it is hard to know precisely what he means. It seems certain that in referring to mental states, it is implicit that someone owns (or is) the mind in which those states are occurring. Although Ayer is right in his claim that we need not refer to the ‘owner’ of the state when we talk about the state itself, and therefore that the owner ‘could’ be us, this doesn’t seem to address the issue at hand. The problem is one of other minds, and we are, all of us, in a situation where we find ourselves confronted with apparent minds other than our own which are problematic. >From the realisation that a belief in other minds can only arise through observation ...
    Related: philosophy of mind, clarendon press, bertrand russell, oxford companion, accurate
  • Summary Of Kants Life - 1,387 words
    Summary Of Kant's Life Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) spent all of his life in Knigsberg, a small German town on the Baltic Sea in East Prussia. (After World War II, Germany's border was pushed west, so Knigsberg is now called Kaliningrad and is part of Russia.) At the age of fifty-five, Kant appeared to be a washout. He had taught at Knigsberg University for over twenty years, yet had not published any works of significance. During the last twenty-five years of his life, however, Kant left a mark on the history of philosophy that is rivaled only by such towering giants as Plato and Aristotle. Kant's three major works are often considered to be the starting points for different branches of modern ...
    Related: immanuel kant, summary, moral philosophy, world war ii, solve
  • Taoism - 2,831 words
    Taoism Philosophy of Mind in China Conceptual and Theoretical Matters Historical Developments: The Classical Period Historical Developments: Han Cosmology Historical Developments: The Buddhist Period Historical Developments: The Neo-Confucian Period Bibliography Introduction: Conceptual and Theoretical Matters Classical Chinese theory of mind is similar to Western folk psychology in that both mirror their respective background view of language. They differ in ways that fit those folk theories of language. The core Chinese concept is xin (the heart-mind). As the translation suggests, Chinese folk psychology lacked a contrast between cognitive and affective states ([representative ideas, cogni ...
    Related: taoism, historical perspective, moral virtue, individual psychology, interpret
  • Taoism - 2,768 words
    ... timately, even Mencius shi-fei (this-not this) are input to the xin. Our experience introduces them relative to our position and past assumptions. They are not objective or neutral judgments. XUNZI also concentrated on issues related to philosophy of mind though in the context of moral and linguistic issues. He initiated some important and historically influential developments in the classical theory. His most famous (and textually suspect) doctrine is human nature is evil. While he clearly wanted to distance himself from Mencius, the slogan at best obscures the deep affinity between their respective views of human nature and mind. Xunzi seems to have drawn both from the tradition advoca ...
    Related: taoism, make sense, classical theory, more important, outlook
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