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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: aviation

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  • Alaskan Aviation - 1,519 words
    ALASKAN AVIATION ALASKAN AVIATION Have you ever looked real close at the maps of Alaska? The next time you see a map look for the little airplane symbol in every little town and village in Alaska. That symbol indicates an airstrip. That symbol also means that that is were some unfortunate bush pilot crashed and said, "This looks like a good place for an airstrip." In the early days of Alaskan aviation it was not possible to call ahead and determine if a community had a suitable landing strip. The pilot simply flew to the village and looked for a open spot to land. A controlled crash into deep snow usually resulted. Once aviation became routine, the landing strips were refined and smoothed, b ...
    Related: alaskan, aviation, aviation industry, military aviation, arctic circle
  • Alaskan Aviation - 1,481 words
    ... made a timed distance run with a stopwatch and compass, and dropped bombs on an unseen target. This became known as dead reckoning bombing or "DR" runs. Eareckson also began using time-delayed fuses on his bombs that prevented the bombs from exploding under the low flying aircraft that had just dropped its ordnance (Garfield 106). His experiences in Alaska were to contribute significantly to the air war in the Pacific. Having flown in the worst weather imaginable, Col. Eareckson was more than capable of handling a few enemy fighters. Another unique aspect of the war in Alaska was the Lend -Lease program. The Lend- Lease program was established to send supplies and equipment to the embat ...
    Related: alaskan, aviation, international airport, ozone layer, elmer
  • Garret Aviation - 1,482 words
    Garret Aviation The Garret Aviation VNT-25 The idea of forced air induction by turbine, or turbo, is not new and has it's mass production roots in WWII fighter planes. What is new, however, is its application to passenger automobiles. Unlike a near constant high RPM fighter engine, an automobile requires wide-open throttle (WOT) power availability throughout its entire operating range. Previous automotive turbo applications acted like an on-off power switch with a five second delay, decreasing drivability, rather than providing the smooth linear powerband of a normally aspirated engine. Because the turbine is in a fixed position in the exhaust stream, it was plagued with sometimes uncontroll ...
    Related: aviation, garret, high performance, fuel economy, inherently
  • Garret Aviation Vnt - 1,499 words
    Garret Aviation Vnt-25 The Garret Aviation VNT-25 The idea of forced air induction by turbine, or turbo, is not new and has it's mass production roots in WWII fighter planes. What is new, however, is its application to passenger automobiles. Unlike a near constant high RPM fighter engine, an automobile requires wide-open throttle (WOT) power availability throughout its entire operating range. Previous automotive turbo applications acted like an on-off power switch with a five second delay, decreasing drivability, rather than providing the smooth linear powerband of a normally aspirated engine. Because the turbine is in a fixed position in the exhaust stream, it was plagued with sometimes unc ...
    Related: aviation, garret, bibliography references, fuel economy, loose
  • Naval Aviation - 1,607 words
    Naval Aviation Throughout the history of Naval Aviation, one can see a growing force. As new technology and innovations arose and advanced, Naval Aviation improved as well. In times of war and peace, through training and dedication, naval aviators improved their abilities and tactics to produce the fighting force it is today. If by chance, the "revolt of the admirals" had failed, the United States Military would not be what it is today and the Navy could not have the liberty of enjoying the Mahanian concept of commanding the sea. As new technology and innovations arose in the late 1800s and early 1900s, the military potentials for Naval Aviation were not so evident. Interest grew in 1898 dur ...
    Related: aviation, naval, naval institute press, united states naval, late 1800s
  • Regulation Of Aviation On A Federal, State And Local Level - 1,350 words
    Regulation Of Aviation On A Federal, State And Local Level Regulation of Aviation at the Federal, State and Local Level Aviation has an impact on everybody and everything. Not only does it have an impact on a worldwide base, but it also has as big an impact on local business. Aviation in regulated in many different ways nationwide. There are many regulations that are federal, such as airspace, and must be obeyed by everyone and there are regulations that are local, such as traffic pattern altitude, and must be obeyed as if they were federal regs. As in any other field of work there are laws and regulations people must obey by. If people were allowed to do what ever they want, then we would l ...
    Related: aviation, aviation administration, aviation industry, federal aviation, general aviation, regulation
  • The Future Of Aviation Insurance - 1,732 words
    The Future Of Aviation Insurance Insurance and the Future of Aviation AVM 401 Analysis of Issues in the Aviation Industry Southern Illinois University, Carbondale September 26, 2000 Assignment #2 Introduction This report will discuss the future of the aviation industry and the effects of high insurance cost. As the industry enters into the millennium, the insurance industry must look at several problems that also face the aviation industry. Survival for the small FBOs is getting harder each day; the threat of financial devastation is real when it comes to lawsuits. General aviation may be forced to change its way of doing business and become more like the military and commercial airlines. On ...
    Related: aviation, aviation industry, aviation safety, general aviation, insurance, insurance company, insurance industry
  • About The 70s - 521 words
    About The 70'S Tonight I will be speaking about one of the most controversial eras of our time. The 70s. When terms like Pardy Hardy! Goin' Cruizin' Right On! ROCK ON!! and Shake your Booty were getting used in everyday conversation. Guys wore their hair long and in afros. Pet rocks were a kids best friend, and mood rings let you know if someone was feeling down. 8 tracks had came and gone, with cassette tapes taking over in a hurry. For the weekend fun, disco clubs were the place to be. If you didnt feel like dancing, cruising the highway while on your CB radio was the alternative, that was if the gas shortage wasnt to bad. You wouldnt have been alarmed if you saw a crazed naked guy running ...
    Related: eric clapton, saturday night, supreme court, norm, marvin
  • Accidents - 1,731 words
    Accidents Aircraft Investigation Each mishap has their own characteristics and there is no substitute for good old-fashioned common sense and initiative. Each wrecked aircraft has its own story to tell if properly investigated. However Air Force guidelines are quick to point out that investigators in their eagerness seek out the causes, often ignore safe investigation practices and common safety precautions. Air Force Investigators are maybe in even more difficult position due to the hazards that are unique to the military war fighting machines, Ill discuss a few of these hazards briefly before I get into the steps of Air Force accident investigations. Munitions Extreme care must be given to ...
    Related: human body, early stages, government agencies, acquire, questioning
  • Accidents - 1,643 words
    ... ike metallurgy, forensics, etc. 5. Obtain all other non-privileged materials gathered by the SIB. 6. Obtain a list of the SIB witnesses. Once all the data and evidence has been collected the advisors are brought in to review all the information and make judgments and evaluations, not to mention aid in the writing of the report. A maintenance advisor reviews maintenance records, documentation, personnel and supervision. A Medical advisor should review: 1. Medical qualifications 2. Postmortem and toxicology reports. Which by the way are obtained from the SIB flight surgeon. 3. Post-accident medical examination records of survivors. 4. And last but not least autopsy protocols and medical re ...
    Related: life support, the intended, total cost, partial, mention
  • Aeronautical University - 356 words
    Aeronautical University Embry Riddle Aeronautical University It's the year 2050 and you are reflecting back on your accomplishments, what do you feel is your greatest achievement? I believe that I have made many great accomplishments in my life but my greatest achievement is supporting myself, my wife and my three kids for the past thirty-eight years. I grew up watching my father and mother support my two sisters and I. I never heard them talk about where they were going to get the money for next months rent or whether they could afford to buy me the five-dollar G.I. Joe action figure from the toy store. I wanted to provide my family with the same comforts my father had provided for my siste ...
    Related: aeronautical, north carolina, high school, united airlines, airplane
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,375 words
    Air Traffic Strike The Pressures of PATCO: Strikes and Stress in the 1980s By Rebecca Pels -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- Note on electronic format: you can access any citation by clicking on the note number. In order to leave citations and return to the main text of the document, press the Back key on your viewer. -------------------------------------------------- ---------------------- On August 3, 1981 almost 13,000 air traffic controllers went on strike after months of negotiations with the federal government. During the contract talks, Robert Poli, president of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Association (PATCO), explained the union's th ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, aviation safety
  • Air Traffic Strike - 4,516 words
    ... emands rested upon prevailing norms of workers' interests and power. Since World War II, labor leaders have placed a disproportionate amount of emphasis on economic gains, and the collective bargaining process has gravitated toward these areas. At the same time, management has carefully guarded its prerogatives from the bargaining process.24 In this context, it seems likely that in envisioning a future strike, controllers felt that wages could and should be one aspect of it. Yet wages were not the decisive factor for most, and their other demands, derived from a far more vital, ideological interest than economic gains, evoked their passionate and surprisingly unified response. Individual ...
    Related: strike, traffic, traffic control, traffic controllers, worlds apart
  • Airframe - 1,100 words
    Airframe Airframe, a novel by Michael Crichton was a fairly good book that became very exciting towards the end. It is about the aviation industry and a fictional company named Norton Aircraft that manufactures planes. There is only one main character and the plot of the novel is about a secret plan to destroy the president of Norton. The book gets off to a slow start, but rapidly builds up pace in the last hundred pages. The main character of the novel is Casey Singleton. She is a divorced mother in her mid-forties. She is a vice president of the Quality Assurance Incident Review Team. Whenever anything goes wrong with a plane that was made by Norton, the Incident Review Team finds out what ...
    Related: airframe, goes wrong, lost world, main character, reporter
  • Airline Safety - 957 words
    ... MD11 crashed near Halifax, Canada: The aircraft was on a nonstop flight from New York's JFK airport to Geneva. The aircraft crashed at night in the Atlantic Ocean close to shore about 50 miles (80 km) southwest of Halifax, Nova Scotia. All 15 crewmembers and 214 passengers were killed. These are just the most recent accidents in the past decade. Almost of all of these tragedies can be avoided with harsher regulations, but they have to implemented first. Interest Groups and Elected Officials Sections One group that is highly involved in airline safety is the National Transportation Safety Board. The NTSB is a small, non-regulatory, independent agency with about 400 employees. At a cost o ...
    Related: airline, aviation safety, national safety, national transportation safety board, safety regulations, transportation safety board
  • Airline Safety - 1,183 words
    Airline Safety Airline Safety Many people travel by airplane all around the world. For some people it is the only way they can get to where they are going. On a daily basis, averages of 28 to 30,000 seats are filled on airplanes (Bear, Stearns Co. URL www.hotelonline.com). At each airport, there are hundreds of arrivals and departures worldwide. Even though airline officials say flying is safe, accidents kill many people because airlines neglect to prevent human error or repair faulty equipment. Sometimes I think the only reason an airplane could crash is if something on the plane were to break. However, most of the time that is not the case. A survey conducted by Boeing found that flight cr ...
    Related: airline, time magazine, internet connection, chicago illinois, faulty
  • Airline Safety Bill 2001 - 1,711 words
    Airline Safety Bill (2001) Introduction (Background of Actors): There are quite a few actors in respect to interest groups and domestic airline safety. The interest groups come from varying backgrounds of business, labor, government and public interest. The actors that we are focused on are the domestic airline companies, the aerospace industry, private security firms, various labor groups, National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Department of Transportation (DOT), Congress, The World Conference on Transportation Research Society (WCTRS) and the American people. Business Sector The business sector plays a major role in our domestic airline safe ...
    Related: airline, airline industry, national transportation safety board, safety regulations, transportation safety board
  • Airline Terrorism - 1,802 words
    Airline Terrorism Whether we would like to admit it or not, aircraft terrorism is a very real and deadly subject. Inside nothing more than a small suitcase, a carefully assembled explosive can bring an ending to the lives of countless men, women, and children, with no preference or regard to age, sex, and religion. In a single moment and flash, families are torn apart as their loved ones become victims of terrorism. As the airline price wars have continued to rage, the amount of fliers increase at phenomenal rates. The airports are filled to maximum capacity with people all interested in just surviving the long lines and finally finding relaxation in their aircraft seats with the help of a c ...
    Related: airline, terrorism, technology assessment, space technology, skies
  • Airport Privatization - 1,436 words
    ... ant to have to worry about cleaning up anything that might be unearthed later. Problems with reuse As construction began, planners soon discovered that although the city was saving time and money by reusing Bergstrom, there were drawbacks. One example came the day after the Air Force vacated the base. All across Bergstrom, residents and employees had turned off the water when they left. The resulting water pressure was more than the old system of pipes could handle. The city field staff ran around for months chasing water leaks. The city soon discovered that much of the base's utility system could not be reused, resulting in one of the first increases in the airport budget. Utilities the ...
    Related: airport, international airport, privatization, international affairs, surrounding area
  • Alaska Airlines - 1,400 words
    Alaska Airlines Alaska Airlines For nearly 70 years, Alaska Airlines has served the west coast of North America. Alaska Airlines has grown from a small regional airline in 1932 to one today that carries more than 12 million customers per year. Alaskas route system spans more than 40 cities and primarily services four countries: Canada, United States, Mexico, and Russia. Its fleet of 88 Boeing jets is the youngest among all major airlines and it has earned U.S. airline recognition from Travel & Leisure and Cond Nast Traveler magazines. The foundation of Alaska Airlines began in 1932, when Mac McGee started flying his three-seat Stinson between Anchorage and Bristol Bay, Alaska. In 1934, a mer ...
    Related: airline industry, alaska, san jose, total assets, financially
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