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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: pessimistic

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  • Balzacs Pessimistic View Of Nineteenth Century Society - 1,752 words
    Balzac's Pessimistic View of Nineteenth Century Society Le Colonel Chabert exhibits the relationship between strong and weak characters. The degree of strength within a character reflects how well the character survives in society. In society, weak characters often have no identity, profession or rank. Stronger characters have power to succeed from inner confidence, motivation and ambition. Any drastic changes brought to the body or soul by the environment corrupts that person's strength thereby affecting their ability to function properly in society. This comparison of characters gives an understanding of Balzac's pessimistic view of nineteenth century society. A character's strength and en ...
    Related: century society, nineteenth, nineteenth century, pessimistic, different perspective
  • Michelangelo Was Pessimistic In His Poetry And An Optimist In His Artwork Michelangelos Artwork Consisted Of Paintings And Sc - 1,472 words
    Michelangelo was pessimistic in his poetry and an optimist in his artwork. Michelangelo's artwork consisted of paintings and sculptures that showed humanity in it's natural state. Michelangelo's poetry was pessimistic in his response to Strazzi even though he was complementing him. Michelangelo's sculpture brought out his optimism. Michelangelo was optimistic in completing The Tomb of Pope Julius II and persevered through it's many revisions trying to complete his vision. Sculpture was Michelangelo's main goal and the love of his life. Since his art portrayed both optimism and pessimism, Michelangelo was in touch with his positive and negative sides, showing that he had a great and stable pe ...
    Related: artwork, consisted, michelangelo, michelangelo buonarroti, optimist, pessimistic, poetry
  • 1984 - 834 words
    1984 "Few novels written in this generation have obtained a popularity as great as that of George Orwells 1984." George Orwells popular and powerful novel was not just a figment of his imagination, it was spawned from many experiences from childhood to early adulthood, as well as from events circa World War II. At age eight, he was shipped off to boarding school where he was the only scholarship student among aristocrats. This was Orwells first taste of dictatorship, of being helpless under the rule of an absolute power. Unlike his classmates, Orwell was unable to afford to go to Oxford or Cambridge and his grades kept him from winning any more scholarships (Scott-Kilvert, 98). Therefore, he ...
    Related: 1984, early adulthood, marshall cavendish corporation, methods used, police
  • 1984 Is A Political Parable George Orwell Wrote The Novel To Show - 418 words
    1984 is a political parable. George Orwell wrote the novel to show society what it could become if things kept getting worse. The first paragraph of the book tells the reader of the swirl of gritty dust....The hallway smelt of boiled cabbage and old rag mats. Just from these few lines Orwell makes it clear that there was absolutely nothing victorious abuot Victory Mansions. Every image the reader recieves from Winston Smith is pessimistic. Hate week, for example, is a big event in Oceania. The citizens prepare for it like Christmas. Instead of jolly songs with family and friends over punch, Hate week is celebrated with fists in the air while chanting about death, Goldstien, and whatever the ...
    Related: 1984, george orwell, orwell, parable, big brother
  • Adventures Of Huck Finn - 1,343 words
    Adventures Of Huck Finn The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was written by Mark Twain. Mark Twain, born Samuel Langhorne Clemens in 1835, led one of the most exciting and adventuresome of literary lives. Raised in the river town of Hannibal, Missouri, Twain had to leave school at age twelve to seek work. He was successively a journeyman printer, a steamboat pilot, a halfhearted Confederate soldier (no more than a few weeks), and a prospector, miner and reporter in the western territories. His experiences furnished him with a wide knowledge of humanity, as well as with the perfect grasp of local customs and speech, which exhibits itself so well in his writing. With the publication in 1865 of T ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, finn, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn, the adventures of huckleberry finn
  • Alcoholism - 1,948 words
    Alcoholism CUNNING, BAFFLING, POWERFUL, PATIENT AND DEADLY Alcoholism: Today's substance abuse, whether alcohol or drugs, continues to be a major social problem. Common patterns occur in all forms of substance abuse. While some types of substance abuse problems are slightly different in terms of causes and cures, experts agree that there are some do's and don'ts which relate to kicking the abuse habit. If you or a loved one have a substance abuse problem, this article can give you sound advice on understanding what substance abuse is, and what to do about it. In this article, we will refer to alcohol, although the word drug may be used synonymously in place of alcohol. What is Alcoholism? Al ...
    Related: alcoholism, chronic disease, addiction research, real thing, depressed
  • Alexander The Great - 5,132 words
    ... 120 and the minimum 60. After the Battle 25 Macedonians fell"in the first charge. Alexander had a statue made of each of them. He then erected each statue somewhere near Granicus. He also erected a statue of himself, although he did not even die, let alone in first charge. This was a strange gesture that would never be repeated again. 2,000 of Memnon's mercenaries survived. After the battle they were chained like lions and sent back to forced labor, probably in the mines. This was not a very placatory gesture by Alexander. The reason he gave for it was that "they had violated Greek public opinion by fighting with the Orientals against the Greeks." After his victory, Alexander went across ...
    Related: alexander, alexander the great, great world, north east, indus river
  • An Author And His Work: A Kid In King Arthurs Court - 1,145 words
    An Author And His Work: A Kid In King Arthur's Court An Author and His Work :A Kid in King Arther's Court May 26, 1999 Research Term Paper An Author and His Work Mark Twain was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens to John Marshal Clemens and Jane Lampton Clemens. He was born on November 30, 1835 in a small city called Florida, Missouri, which had a population of one hundred people. I increased the population by one percent, he said. It is more than many of the best men in history could have done for a town (Cox, 7) Samuel, however did not live most of his life in Florida, but moved around throughout his life. His family moved to Hannibal, MO when he was four years old and that was where he went to ...
    Related: king arthur, public schools, foreign countries, langhorne clemens, florida
  • Andy Worhal - 1,891 words
    Andy Worhal Andy Worhal Andy Warhol, the American painter, printmaker, illustrator, and film maker was born in Pittsburgh on August 6, 1928, shortly afterwards settling in New York. The only son of immigrant, Czech parents, Andy finished high school and went on to the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh, graduating in 1949 with hopes of becoming an art teacher in the public schools. While in Pittsburgh, he worked for a department store arranging window displays, and often was asked to simply look for ideas in fashion magazines . While recognizing the job as a waste of time, he recalls later that the fashion magazines "gave me a sense of style and other career opportunities." Upon ...
    Related: andy, andy warhol, jasper johns, corporate image, rows
  • Animal Farm - 479 words
    Animal Farm Based on viewing the movie Animal Farm and reading the novel of the same I have come to a base of centered agreements. I know that both of these stories differ dramatically in many ways and also the themes of each I believe are totally unlike one another. George Orwell wrote Animal Farm and I believe that this man purposes the same basic ideas as the movie as well as the novel even though he didnt write the screenplay for the movie. The main theme of the movie is highly more creative and more decisive. In the beginning the animals want nothing to do with humans nor do they try to be anything like them. They keep this principle in mind throughout the book but with some minor crack ...
    Related: animal farm, farm, main theme, george orwell, concentrate
  • Antagonism Between Men And Women - 769 words
    Antagonism Between Men And Women Women have always been oppressed by men, that the antagonism between men and women has its origin deep in human psychology or biology, and that the way women suffer in our society is nothing but the same old story that has been going on ever since human life began. This is such a pessimistic view that it is hard to understand why it is so popular with feminists today. If women are put at a disadvantage by human nature itself, how can we ever change things? Either an all-out war against men could lead to men being forced to change their ways without changing their basically anti-women ideas; or a few women could separate themselves off from the rest of society ...
    Related: men and women, human nature, black people, human race, manufacture
  • Arthur Miller And Tennessee Williams, Including A Streetcar Named Desire - 4,269 words
    ... g the subject matter of Face to Face (1975) overly familiar and rating his English-language The Serpent's Egg (1977) an overall failure. Autumn Sonata (1978) and From the Life of the Marionettes (1980) were critical successes, however, although the latter failed at the box office. Fanny and Alexander (1983), a rich and fantastic portrait of childhood in a theatrical family, was regarded as one of his finest films and won an Academy Award for best foreign language film of 1983. Subsequently, Bergman directed After the Rehearsal (1984), his meditation on a life in the theater. WILLIAM S. PECHTER Bibliography: Bergman, Ingmar, Bergman on Bergman (1973); Cowie, Peter, Ingmar Bergman: A Criti ...
    Related: arthur, arthur miller, miller, named desire, streetcar, streetcar named, streetcar named desire
  • Bean Trees By Kingsolver - 652 words
    Bean Trees By Kingsolver In "The Bean Trees," by Barbara Kingsolver, readers are given the chance to see how two characters that have completely different lifestyles come together and deal with everyday problems, family relationships, and motherhood. Lou Ann chose a lifestyle that would cause her to get married, have a baby and move away right after high school. On the other hand Taylor did everything in her power not to end up living that lifestyle, and I think it resulted in Taylor being a more dependent and strong person than Lou Ann. A good example of how different their characters are is how they deal with everyday problems. For example, the way they go about trying to find a job clearl ...
    Related: bean, kingsolver, trees, high school, good communication
  • Bipolar Disorder In Kids - 1,656 words
    ... is very dangerous when a person is in a manic state, not only for themselves, but also for others around them. They are very unpredictable people. Bipolar people abuse drugs, such as alcohol, cocaine, and sleeping medications. They also often deny that they are manic because they think that everything is okay with them because they feel so good about themselves (Bipolar Disorder 2). The other side of being Bipolar is the lows that a person has to go through, the depressed part of the disorder. When a Bipolar adult is in the depression stage they can Determining Bipolar Disorder in children is harder then adults because of the mistakes doctor's make in their diagnosis. have any or all th ...
    Related: affective disorder, bipolar, bipolar disorder, disorder, mood disorder, personality disorder
  • Buddhism - 1,651 words
    Buddhism In Life there is suffering. This spurs on the unending search for universal truth and meaning. Jodo Shinsu is an answer to this search. The "practice" of Jodo Shinshu is the recitation of the Nembutsu with self-reflection. It involves hearing the call of Amida Buddha, the Buddha of Eternal Life and Infinite Light, Compassion and Wisdom, within others' or ours recitation of the Name. Which calls us to raise our spiritual perspectives beyond immediate ego interests to universal concerns for compassion, justice in the human community and concern for the life of nature. The hole of life is Nembutsu. A life lived in awareness, that we ourselves are the expressions, the manifestations, of ...
    Related: buddhism, human beings, right view, practical guide, enlightened
  • Camelot: The Archetypal Environment - 1,298 words
    Camelot: The Archetypal Environment In Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the setting plays an integral role in the meaning of the poem. The three settings are all inseparable from the events which take place there and the manner in which Gawain is affected by the inhabitants. Camelot, Lord Bertilak's castle and the Green Chapel and their characters are considerably distinct from each other, each affecting and appealing to Gawain in a particular way. Because of its many positive qualities and familiarity, ultimately, the most attractive and appealing setting is Camelot. Lord Bertilak's castle has several positive aspects but is not the most appealing because most of these elements are deceptiv ...
    Related: round table, sir gawain and the green knight, roman empire, cleft, alternate
  • Candid By Voltaire - 1,349 words
    Candid By Voltaire Francois-Marie Arouet de Voltaire, in his satirical masterwork Candide, critiques both society and humanity wit little mercy. The author obviously seeks to expose all of the human race's self-deceptions and weaknesses, but he does so with great humor. Voltaire gives delight with his humor while planting the deeper message about the fallibility and corruption of humanity. This contradiction holds the power of Voltaire's writing. Candide provides a horrific portrait of the human condition, but it does so with preposterous and outlandish humor. Voltaire especially intends to criticize the popular idea of his era that sees a rational order in the world: "Voltaire shows how the ...
    Related: candid, voltaire, human condition, francois marie arouet, critiquing
  • Candide By Voltaire - 441 words
    Candide By Voltaire In the novel, Candide, Voltaire uses many literary writing tools to prove the points in which he believes. Some of these many literary tools are irony, satire, and symbolism. Through these tools, Voltaire proves that greed is a universal vice, and usually ends in ones own destruction. Voltaire strongly emphasizes his pessimistic view throughout the story. During Chapter 10, he uses his philosophies, as well as other literary tools, to present greed as a devastating factor of societys corruption. For example, Cunegonde found that someone had stolen her money and jewels. "Who could have stolen my money and diamonds? ...I strongly suspect a reverend Franciscan who slept in t ...
    Related: candide, voltaire, more important, york city, vice
  • Candide By Voltaire - 386 words
    Candide By Voltaire In Voltaires Candide, Voltaire presents a story with a distinctive outlook on life. He tells of a world that has gone mad and is laced with evil. Voltaire questions optimism, philosophy, and absolutes. Through his story he exploits absolutes such as: justice, happiness, true love, humanity, brotherhood, and many others. He leaves the reader feeling that the world really is a cruel place and that happiness is hard to come by. By using the main character Candide, a naive and innocent optimist, Voltaire ridicules concepts such as: belief, philosophy, religion, and absolutes in society. Candide and Pangloss are infact used to show the ludicracy in complete optimism. Most of t ...
    Related: candide, voltaire, true love, main character, martin
  • Candide Voltaires Writing Style - 1,150 words
    Candide - Voltaire's Writing Style In Candide, Voltaire uses many writing techniques which can also be found in the works of Cervantes, Alighieri, Rabelais and Moliere. The use of the various styles and conventions shows that, despite the passage of centuries and the language differences, certain writing techniques will always be effective. One common literary technique is the author's use of one or more of his characters as his 'voice' to speak out the authors views on a certain subject. For instance, in Moliere's Tartuffe, the author uses the character of Cleante to speak out against religious hypocrites (page 1419, lines 99-102): Nothing that I more cherish and admire Than honest zeal and ...
    Related: candide, writing style, writing techniques, divine comedy, point of view
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