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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: personal identity

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  • 3 Non Traditional Religions Voodoo, Spiritualism, Cults - 1,932 words
    ... Evil Deeds done on Earth, VII. Eternal Progress Open to every Human Soul. (Spiritualism) Spiritualists are often accused of being atheists or Anti-Christian, yet our first Principle recognizes God as our Father; but who is God?. Spiritualism is universal religion recognizing such leaders as Buddha, Mohammed, Moses as well as Jesus. It does not however, claim a monopoly of Religion. Ones religion is a personal matter and any person adopting Spiritualism is free to interpret the principles according to their own awareness. Furthermore, they do not believe in a Vindictive God. They are their own judges and they shall receive compensation or retribution for what ever they have done whether ...
    Related: human soul, psychological effects, encarta online, accused, steven
  • Biracial - 1,958 words
    Bi-Racial Table Of Contents Page # I. Cover Page 1 II. Table of Contents 2 III. Report 3 IV. Glossary 12 V. Works Cited 13 Bi-Racial Children Its 3rd grade. Im late for school, and my mother had to walk me in to class so that my teacher would know the reason for my tardiness. My mom opens the door to my class room, and there is a hush of silence. Everyones eyes are fixed on my mother and me. She tells the teacher why I was late, gives me a kiss goodbye and leaves for work. As I sit down at my seat, all of my so-called friends start to call me names and tease me. The students tease me not because I was late, but because my mother is white. Situations like this are hard for a young child ...
    Related: biracial, cultural communication, ethnic groups, personal identity, america
  • Brave New World By Huxley - 704 words
    Brave New World By Huxley John the savage and Mustapha Mond the world controller both have their separate ideas of what happiness is. Mustapha defends the new society, pointing out the advantages that the savage world does not have, and what he perceives as the people being happy. "But I don't want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, and I want goodness. I want sin." "In fact," said Mustapha Mond, "you're claiming the right to be unhappy." "All right then," said the Savage defiantly, "I'm claiming the right to be unhappy." "Not to mention the right to grow old and ugly and impotent. The right to have syphilis and cancer; the right to have too little to eat ...
    Related: brave, brave new world, huxley, personal identity, everyday life
  • Communication And Race - 1,175 words
    Communication And Race The most critical aspects of media performance with regards to race and ethnicity are issues that relate to the quality of its representation of the lives of people of color. Accuracy and diversity are aspects of media performance that will allow for a careful evaluation of how it represents people of color. Evaluating media performance is important because of the utilization and reliance on the mass media for much of society's reflexive monitoring and evaluation of reality. The performance of mass media is important in regards to race and ethnicity because the mass media are the primary source of indirect or mediated experiences that reinforce racial attitudes and bel ...
    Related: race and ethnicity, public interest, personal identity, social policy, regard
  • Comparing Casablanca To 1984 - 923 words
    Comparing 'Casablanca' to '1984' How can a hero survive in a world gone mad? Both Casablanca, the classic 1940s film, and hailed as the greatest movie ever by some, and 1984, a piece of classic literature by George Orwell, also seen as being one of the most important novels of the 20th century, revolve around a world in chaos, where no one trusts anybody else, and a war wages on within and without. In 1984, Winston hides from a totalitarian, thought controlling government, that is out to stomp out all aggression against the Party. Rick dealt with a world rocked by the impacts of World War II, where everyone was a spy, and even the spies were spied on. Both wish for hope and courage in their ...
    Related: 1984, casablanca, comparing, classic literature, ordinary people
  • Crittically Examine The Use Of The Term Community - 1,380 words
    ... titutionalisation was not acceptable or possible. The traditional social support networks found in the close knit occupational communities were also missing due to the decline of the close knit community. This was taken one step further when in the eighties, the desire to privatise public enterprises and reduce public expenditure, including industrial subsidies led to a rapid decline of manufacturing in the early 1980s and led to historically high levels of unemployment. Which as we have seen weakens a communities social support network. Over the last twenty years the main way social policy has responded to these problems is by encouraging the development of community care initiatives, t ...
    Related: community care, community policing, examine, short term, personal identity
  • Dreams - 1,186 words
    Dreams Dreams have been objects of boundless fascination and mystery for humankind since the beginning of time. These nocturnal vivid images seem to arise from some source other than our ordinary conscious mind. They contain a mixture of elements from our own personal identity, which we recognize as familiar along with a quality of `others' in the dream images that carries a sense of the strange and eerie. The bizarre and nonsensical characters and plots in dreams point to deeper meanings and contain rational and insightful comments on our waking situations and emotional experiences. The ancients thought that dreams were messages from the gods. The cornerstone of Sigmund Freud's infamous psy ...
    Related: dream interpretation, dreams, waking life, sigmund freud, repeat
  • Ecological Self - 703 words
    Ecological Self Diversity is a whirlwind of color through a society. There are no two people in the world that are exactly alike. Individuality distinguishes one person or thing from others (Landau, 364 Ed). A persons environment as a whole: an interaction with others, experiences, and time, makes a collage of traits that distinguishes someone as an individual. David Sibleys theory of the "Ecological Self" or Identity is bound by his determents of social, cultural, and spatial context. Sibley believes that class, race, gender, and nation shapes our identity, it is a single concept that is molded by our experiences from the world. I do not agree with this claim because people are individuals, ...
    Related: ecological, self identity, important role, college campuses, gender
  • Engl: Book Critique Mark Posters The Mode Of Information - 1,359 words
    ... n of traditional Japanese cultural values with American consumer culture. In fact, anywhere where capitalism and consumer culture exist, we can find evidence of what could be seen as the de-centering of identity via the messages and demands of new Media. The individual "freedom" which Poster believes a de-centering of cultural identity via new Media entails raises some doubts questionable, however. Poster believes that through this de-centering force, individuals gain "freedom" from pre-conceived notions of their potential identity and place in the world. Thus the "de-centering" of their previously ordained identity ( ordained in the sense in which it is established for them by their soc ...
    Related: book critique, critique, mark, mode, american consumer
  • Frederick Douglass - 1,743 words
    Frederick Douglass How did the early years of Frederick Douglass' life affect the beliefs of the man he would become? Frederick Douglass' adulthood was one of triumph and prestige. Still, he by no means gained virtue without struggle and conflict. There was much opposition and hostility against him. To fully understand all his thoughts and beliefs first one must look at his childhood. Frederick Augustus Bailey was born in February of 1818 to a black field hand named Harriet. He grew up on the banks of the Tuckahoe Creek deep within the woods of Maryland. Separated from his mother at an early age, he was raised by his grandparents Betsy and Isaac Bailey. Isaac and Betsy are not thought to be ...
    Related: frederick, frederick douglass, early years, nat turner, hearing
  • Hopi Kachina Dolls - 1,979 words
    Hopi Kachina Dolls High on the mesas in the arid land of northeastern Arizona live the Hopi, westernmost of the Pueblo people. A small, peaceful and friendly group, they have occupied their barren mesa tops and farmed their arid but fertile valleys for many centuries. Clinging tenaciously to their marginal land, they have withstood drought, famine and the onslaught of nomadic raiders. The pressure of Spanish domination, pestilence and, more recently, cultural inundation have diminished but not destroy their traditional pattern of life. The Hopi are bound together by their religion, a multi-stranded cord uniting them to withstand the hazards of a harsh environment and in rebuffing foreign inc ...
    Related: hopi, hopi indians, san francisco, social issues, familiar
  • How Do Psychologists Attempt To Explain The Origins Of Prejudice - 1,390 words
    How Do Psychologists Attempt To Explain The Origins Of Prejudice? HOW DO PSYCHOLOGISTS ATTEMPT TO EXPLAIN THE ORIGINS OF PREJUDICE? DO THEY OFFER SOCIETY ANY HOPE THAT IT MAY BE REDUCED? BY JON SALECLEMENTS. Ethnocentrism is the tendency to assume that one's culture or way of life is superior to all others. Prejudice is a negative attitude toward an entire category of individuals. Discrimination is behaviour that excludes all members of a group from certain rights, opportunities or privileges. A range of international events have recently focused attention on the issue of prejudice; increasing ethno-nationalistic tensions in former Eastern block countries, racial conflict in the Middle East, ...
    Related: prejudice, psychologists, psychodynamic approach, individual differences, reduction
  • Issues Of Mannerism - 1,777 words
    Issues Of Mannerism Issues of Mannerism The movement in painting that is now referred to as Mannerism began in Italy around 1520, influenced artists throughout Europe, and lasted until the end of the 16th century. The word Mannerism originates from the Italian word maniera which translates into the English word style. The basis of Mannerism then is style; its a period of art where the focus was on grace and beauty. While preceding trends of Renaissance art looked to nature to find their style, working to perfect it, Mannerists manipulated nature creating a gross perfection of human form, idealizing forms to the point of abstraction. Definitions of Mannerist art as well as the reasons for its ...
    Related: mannerism, renaissance art, primary colors, human body, grace
  • Jane Austen - 1,295 words
    Jane Austen EL2 - Essay 2 Angela Bathgate Tutor - Julie Marney 6. How does Mansfield Park interrogate the relationship of power and gender? Mansfield Park by Jane Austen is a classic realist text, which is almost exclusively focused on a small strip of society, namely the upper-middle class of rural England; the class to which she herself belonged. Throughout her novel, Austen portrays the disadvantaged position of woman, presenting the issues of gender stereotyping and marriage choice as the main problems they have to confront. "Gender came to be seen as a construct of society, designed to facilitate the smooth-running of society to the advantage of men"1, proving that men gained power thro ...
    Related: austen, jane, jane austen, personal identity, society and culture
  • King Lear - 874 words
    King Lear The play of King Lear is about a person in search of their own personal identity. In the historical period in which this play is set, the social structure was set in order of things closest to Heaven. Therefore, on Earth, the king was at the top, followed by his noblemen and going all the way down to the basest of objects such as rocks and dirt. This structure was set up by the people, and by going by the premise that anything that is man made is imperfect, this system cannot exist for long without conflict. Through tattered clothes small vices do appear; Robes and furred gowns hide all. Plate sin with gold, And the strong lance of justice hurtles breaks; (IV, vi). The chaos that o ...
    Related: king lear, lear, social structure, personal identity, edmund
  • Left And Right Brain - 661 words
    Left And Right Brain Psychology Right Brain, Left Brain The human brain is a miraculous organ. It regulates thought, memory, judgment, personal identity, and other aspects of what is commonly called mind. It also regulates aspects of the body including body temperature, blood pressure, and the activity of internal organs to help the body respond to its environment and to maintain the body's health. In fact, the brain is considered so central to human well-being and survival that the death of the brain is considered in many parts of the world to be equal legally to the death of the person. In the past fifteen years or so there has been a lot of talk of left brain and right brain people. Clear ...
    Related: brain, human brain, left hand, personal identity, everyday life
  • Liberated - 396 words
    Liberated Sandra Smithes Liberated The monotony of life has waged war against the narrator in Alice Munro's "Miles City, Montana." The author depicts the narrator as a brittle woman in search of a personal identity among a community of conformity. This battle between domestic responsibility and personal satisfaction reeks havoc on the soldier of this mother and wife. Munro is a master of characterization, and through the protagonist she depicts the complexities of human nature. Now, as the family of four travels across the continent, the narrator is able to slough off all the obligations which society has dumped on her. Almost relieved, "we shed our house, the neighborhood, the city, and ... ...
    Related: human nature, personal identity, young children, chores, siege
  • Man Who Mistook His Wife For Hat - 768 words
    Man Who Mistook His Wife For Hat Men ought to know that from nothing else but the brain come joys, delights, laughter and sports, and sorrows, griefs despondency, and lamentations. And by this, in an especial manner, we acquire wisdom and knowledge, and see and hear and know what are foul and what are fair, what are bad and what are good, what are sweet and what are unsavory......And by the same organ we become mad and delirious, and fears and terrors assail us... All these things we endure from the brain when it is not healthy... In these ways I am of the opinion that the brain exercises the greatest power in the man. --Hippocrates, "On the Sacred Disease" (4th century B.C) "It is human nat ...
    Related: panic attacks, personal identity, neurological disorders, comprehend, frequent
  • Marijuana Cannabus - 859 words
    Marijuana (Cannabus) Marijuana (Cannabis) Cannabis sativa, the hemp plant, grows wild throughout most of the tropic and temperate regions of the world. Prior to the advent of synthetic fibers, the cannabis plant was cultivated for the tough fiber of its stem. In the United Stated, cannabis is legitimately grown only for scientific research. In fact, since 1980, the United States has been the only country where cannabis is licitly cultivated for scientific research. Cannabis contains chemicals called cannabinoids that are unique to the cannabis plant. Among the cannabinoids synthesized by the plant are: cannabinol, cannabidiol, cannabinolidic acids, cannabigerol, cannabichromene, and several ...
    Related: marijuana, scientific research, regions of the world, reproductive system, illusion
  • Marty Pelletier - 1,011 words
    Marty Pelletier annon Channels of Identification When we see stories on the news of children murdering each other, what must we think in terms of responsibility and which influences contributed to the decisions which left four children and a teacher dead? Who is responsible? How do we as individuals make decisions? What in our culture influences our behavior and impacts our value systems? More specifically, what exactly does it mean to be influenced? I have chosen television as my focus because I feel it is the most successful media in terms of sculpting social values and, therefore, social relations. The examination of the television industry, with an emphasis on communication (through perc ...
    Related: marty, value systems, social values, social animal, organisms
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