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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: automobile

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  • Automobile Emissions - 1,899 words
    Automobile Emissions Pollution from automobile emissions has become over the past few decades an issue of great concern. With a growing number of motor vehicles on our roads great concern has been attributed to the effects of these emissions to our health and to the environment. Several of the gases emitted, which when present in certain concentrations in our atmosphere can be toxic, therefor these ultimate concentrations must never be achieved. Strict legislation as well as sophisticated control technology has been implemented in the automotive industry in order to limit the pollution caused. These aspects of automotive pollution shall be further discussed in this paper. KEYWORDS: Pollution ...
    Related: automobile, emission control, term effects, health effects, hemoglobin
  • Automobile Emissions - 1,846 words
    ... uction in carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and nitrogen oxide emissions. Figure 3.1 illustrates the percentage of these pollutant resulting from automobile emissions. POLLUTANT TOTAL AMOUNT VEHICLE EMISSIONS Amount Percentage NITROGEN OXIDES 36 019 17 012 47 HYDROCARBONS 33 869 13 239 39 CARBON MONOXIDE 119 148 78 227 66 Table 3-1 Pollution Accounted by Automobile Emissions in 1989 (1000 tons) The 1970 amendment requirements were so stringent for that period that they could not be met with available engine technology. New technology has since been developed and the requirements have been met. However, more rigid standards are continuously being proposed to improve emissions. While significa ...
    Related: automobile, automobile industry, emission control, internal combustion engine, automotive industry
  • Automobile Industry - 1,462 words
    Automobile Industry Industry Analysis The automobile industry began with Henry Fords production of the Model T in the early 1900s. With the creation of the assembly line, cars became cheaper and quicker to produce, thus making them affordable for many people. There were originally 500 auto manufacturers. By 1908, there were only 200; and in 1917 only 23 remained. This vast reduction was due to large amounts of consolidation within the industry. Currently, the major competitors within the industry are Ford, DaimlerChrylser, General Motors (GM), Honda, Toyota, and Volkswagen. A few United States (US) manufacturers produce 23% of the worlds vehicles while Japan is responsible for 21%. The tende ...
    Related: automobile, automobile industry, automotive industry, industry analysis, european union
  • Automobile Industry - 1,464 words
    ... sistency within Fords manufacturing plants. Fords borrowing can be explained by its leverage ratios. Fords debt ratio has remained relatively steady over the last 5 years. 1998s debt ratio was 82.65%. This shows how they were relying heavily on borrowed funds to finance operations. This is further evinced by Fords debt-to-equity ratio of 4.77 in 1998, which is up from past years. Compared to the 1.97 industry average, Fords number appears quite high. Fords times-interest-earned for 1998 was 3.68, an increase from previous years. This could be due to the $15,955 million gain Ford recorded as a result of the spin-off of their interest in The Associates, Inc. The liquidity of Ford, indicate ...
    Related: automobile, automobile industry, automotive industry, ford motor company, market value
  • Automobile Industry - 1,153 words
    Automobile Industry There is no industry more present in the world-wide community than the automobile industry. The automobile has changed the lives, culture, and economy of the people and nations that manufacture and demand them. Ever since the late 1800s when the first "modern" car was invented by Benz and Daimler in Germany, the industry has grown into a billion dollar industry affecting so many aspects of our lives. There are more than 400 million passenger cars alone on the roads today. During the early part of the twentieth century, the United States was home to more than 90 percent of the worlds automotive industry, but has shrunk to about 20 percent in todays world. This drastic chan ...
    Related: auto industry, automobile, automobile industry, automotive industry, great lakes
  • Automobile Industry - 1,083 words
    ... industry. Consumers are now demanding lower prices and more luxuries in their cars. To deal with this consumer demand, auto manufacturers have begun by lowering employee pay rolls, replacing employees with machines and more capable workers to improve productivity, and many times merge with other companies to better compete in the market. Production growth has been about 2-3 percent for the past few years in the auto industry, and hopefully will continue by implementing new cost efficient procedures. American industries, competing in the international markets, face the problem of a strong dollar compared to the weaker currencies of foreign nations. This means that American cars to foreign ...
    Related: auto industry, automobile, automobile industry, carbon monoxide, global positioning system
  • History Of The Automobile - 788 words
    History of the Automobile History of the Automobile Automobiles are one of the most important and prominent inventions possibly ever created. Without automobiles our lives would be completely changed and different. Automobiles changed the way people traveled and lived. Without cars there would be no drive-ins, drive-thru fast food restaurants, and shopping centers. People depend on their cars whether they're earning their living, or traveling to their dream vacation spot. The United States is the leading producer of automobiles and is often called the "Nation On Wheels." The U.S has become very dependent on cars for transportation. Racing automobiles is also a very popular sport which attrac ...
    Related: automobile, history, electric cars, food restaurants, manufacture
  • A Good Man Is Hard To Find - 1,311 words
    A Good Man Is Hard To Find A Look at Flannery O'Connor's "A Good Man is Hard to Find" By Amy Carr In the short story A Good Man is Hard to Find, Flannery O'Connor uses many different tactics to accurately portray the south in the 1950's. O'Connor uses her style, themes, and point of view to tell a story of a family outing gone wrong. The story involves a grandmother, her only son and his wife, and their two bratty children, June Star and John Wesley. On their way to Florida, the grandmother convinces the family to detour to see an old house, and while heading towards their destination, the car overturns. The much-feared criminal, The Misfit, an escaped murderer, encounters the family, and of ...
    Related: good man is hard to find, nuclear family, book reports, john wesley, trees
  • Accomplice Liabilty - 2,655 words
    ... er to determine the legislative intent behind this statute. There is no concrete history for the present code but the court relied on commentary from the tentative draft of the Alaska Criminal Code revision. The commentary states, "Subsection (2) codifies the current case law that one is liable as a traditional 'accomplice' if he acts 'with intent to promote or facilitate the commission of the offense'." Alaska Criminal Code Revision Part II, at 31 (Tent. Draft 1977) (citations omitted) quoted in 818 P.2d 691, 692. This comment is persuasive because prior to the revision every time the Supreme Court of Alaska defined the mens rea requirement for an accomplice it stated that one has to ha ...
    Related: criminal law, criminal case, drunk driving, alaskan, requirement
  • Acid - 1,218 words
    Acid Rain Acid rain is a serious problem with disastrous effects. Each day this serious problem increases. Many people believe that this issue is too small to deal with right now, and others believe it should be met head on. In the following paragraphs I will be discussing the impact of acid rain effects on wildlife and how our atmosphere is being destroyed. Causes Acid rain is a cancer, eating into the face of Eastern Canada and the North Eastern United States. In Canada, the main sulphuric acid sources are non-ferrous smelters and power generation. On both sides of the border, automobiles are the main sources for nitric acid (about 40% of the total). Power generating plants, industrial com ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, great lakes, disease prevention, bear
  • Acid Rain - 1,013 words
    Acid Rain Acid Rain (The Environmental Effects) My first question is , What is Acid Rain? You hear about it all the time in the news and it is very important to the earths ecosystem. In simple terms, acid rain is rain that is more acidic than normal. All objects in nature have a certain level of acicicity but acid rain has too much acid in it. Acid rain is a complicated problem, caused by air pollution. Acid rain's spread and damage involves weather, chemistry, soil, and the life cycles of plants and animals on the land and from acid rain in the water. Acidity is measured using a pH scale, with the number 7 being neutral. Therefore, a body with a pH value of less than 7 is acidic. On the oth ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, air pollution, new england
  • Acid Rain And North America - 1,891 words
    Acid Rain And North America In the past century, one of the greatest threats to North America's aquatic ecosystem has been the widespread acidification of hundreds of thousands of waterways. Acid rain has effected plant and animal life within aquatic ecosystems, as well as microbiologic activity by affecting the rates of decomposition and the accumulation of organic matter. What causes this poisonous rain, and what can be done to improve North America's water quality and prevent future catastrophes? To answer these questions, we must first examine the cause and formation of acid rain, as well as understand ways to decrease or prevent its formation. Formation of acid rain. Acid deposition, mo ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, america, north america, rain
  • Acid Rains - 540 words
    Acid Rains Acid rain refers to all types of precipitation--rain, snow, sleet, hail, fog--that is acidic in nature. Acidic means that these forms of water have a pH lower than the 5.6 average of rainwater. Acid rain kills aquatic life, trees, crops and other vegetation, damages buildings and monuments, corrodes copper and lead piping, damages such man-made things as automobiles, reduces soil fertility and can cause toxic metals to leach into underground drinking water sources. Rain is naturally acidic because carbon dioxide, found normally in the earth's atmosphere, reacts with water to form carbonic acid. While "pure" rain's acidity is pH 5.6-5.7, actual pH readings vary from place to place ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, carbon dioxide, bodies of water, dioxide
  • Advertising Subliminal - 814 words
    Advertising (Subliminal) ENL 1 Modern advertising companies rely heavily on subliminal messaging to entice their target audiences. Advertisements are often crafted for the purpose of appealing to specific characteristics in the hopes of drawing the attention and appealing to the senses of prospective buyers. Tobacco companies have become notorious for the implementation of such techniques. The images portrayed in many of big tobaccos ads stimulate a variety of senses and emotions. One common tactic used by Camel cigarettes (a subsidiary of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.) is to isolate and promote lifes pleasures, and American patriotism. A specific Camel ad found in Elle, a common, upscale womens ...
    Related: advertising, modern advertising, subliminal, young women, american classic
  • Aerodynamics In Cars - 417 words
    AERODYNAMICS IN CARS Aerodynamics has always been around. People have always been discovering ways to make things travel better and faster through air. Ever since the first man put a sharpened rock on the end of a spear or arrow or made a boomerang come back. Now days people understand the concepts of why certain shapes work better. In aerodynamics new discoveries are being made every day. Aerodynamics is often used in sports. New ideas and discoveries can change the way athletes are able to perform. Without aerodynamics in sports, balls would fall faster and cars would go slower. The importance of aerodynamics has been known throughout most of automobile racing history. In the early days of ...
    Related: aerodynamics, cars, more important, divide, travel
  • Agricultural Crisis - 1,233 words
    Agricultural Crisis The Agricultural Crisis: Crisis of Culture In this novel by Wendell Berry, Berry's describes in his thesis that modern culture is destroying the agricultural culture. He feels that technology is seen as the easy way to produce food faster and more efficiently. With this modern way of farming comes the idea that hard work is not needed to make a living. The goal is comfort and leisure. Berry feels that this is the reason for the deterioration of the agricultural culture. He believes that hard work and pride in workmanship is more important than material goods and money. This was by no means a perfect society. The people had often been violent wand wasteful in the use of la ...
    Related: agricultural, crisis, military force, young children, displacement
  • Air Pollution - 1,981 words
    Air Pollution (name, title) Executive Summary An evaluation of the implications of environmental air pollution on human life and the macro, meso and micro level steps being taken to change the current status of air pollution is the purpose of this site. The method of analysis used involved researching the actual hazards of air pollution on humans, what solutions government agencies have proposed/implemented (macro), what steps cities across the United States have taken (meso) and how you (micro) can take a step toward solving the air pollution problem. The conclusion I have drawn from this research is that with the abundance of evidence supporting the idea that air pollution has become a ser ...
    Related: air pollution, pollution, pollution problem, african american, government agencies
  • Air Pollution - 1,546 words
    Air Pollution Air Pollution is addition of harmful substances to the atmosphere resulting in damage to the environment, human health, and quality of life. One of many forms of pollution, air pollution occurs inside homes, schools, and offices; in cities; across continents; and even globally. Air pollution makes people sick, it causes breathing problems and promotes cancer, and it harms plants, animals, and the ecosystems in which they live. Some air pollutants return to earth in the form of acid rain and snow, which corrode statues and buildings, damage crops and forests, and make lakes and streams unsuitable for fish and other plant and animal life. Pollution is changing the earth's atmosph ...
    Related: air pollution, pollution, greenhouse gases, global scale, burn
  • Air Pollution - 1,493 words
    ... ures have in fact been rising, and the years from 1987 to 1997 were the warmest ten years on record. Most scientists are reluctant to say that global warming has actually begun because climate naturally varies from year to year and decade to decade, and it takes many years of records to be sure of a fundamental change. There is little disagreement, though, that global warming is on its way. Global warming will have different effects in different regions. A warmed world is expected to have more extreme weather, with more rain during wet periods, longer droughts, and more powerful storms. Although the effects of future climate change are unknown, some predict that exaggerated weather condi ...
    Related: air pollution, pollution, pollution control, lung disease, more effective
  • Air Pollution - 1,431 words
    Air Pollution Air pollution Introduction With the great concern surrounding the destruction of the earths atmosphere due to air pollution, the immediate and direct harm caused to the human body is often over shadowed. While many are aware that our careless use of hazardous chemicals and fossil fuels may leave the planet uninhabitable in the future, most over look the fact that they are also cause real damage to our bodies at this moment. Such pollutants cause damage to our respiratory system, leading to the fluctuation of the life span of an individual depending on a number of conditions. Amongst these conditions are the individuals specific geographic location, age, and life style. This pap ...
    Related: air pollution, pollution, life span, educational foundation, excessive
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