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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: patriarchal

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  • A Patriarchal World Assimilation - 1,578 words
    A Patriarchal World --Assimilation A Patriarchal World John Bodnar says it well when he suggests that the center of everyday life was to be found in the family-household. It was here that past values and present realities were reconciled, examined on an intelligible scale, evaluated and mediated. This assertion implies that the immigrant family-household is the vehicle of assimilation. I will take this assertion a step further and examine more specifically the powerful role of the patriarchal father within Anzia Yezierska's book Bread Givers and Barry Levinson's film Avalon. Yezierska's theme vividly depicts the constraint of a patriarchal world, while Levinson illustrates the process of ass ...
    Related: assimilation, old world, patriarchal, jewish american, more important
  • Adrienne Rich - 1,721 words
    ... breadth, complexity and multidimensionality, in focusing on a fragment of a much larger statement when she states categorically that 'women's supposed complicated, pain-enduring, multipleasured physicality hardly seems a very hopeful basis on which to build resistance to their social subordination...' (14) Well no, it wouldn't be, if that were actually what Rich was proposing. I turn to a fragment from Integrity, from A Wild Patience to illustrate something of the complexity to be found in the poetry This extract is from 'Integrity', collected in A Wild Patience: Anger and tenderness: my selves. And now I can believe they breathe in me as angels, not polarities. Anger and tenderness: the ...
    Related: adrienne, adrienne rich, creative process, humane society, soar
  • Adrienne Rich - 1,719 words
    Adrienne Rich "What I know, I know through making poems" Passion, Politics and the Body in the Poetry of Adrienne Rich Liz Yorke, Nottingham Trent University, England This paper is largely extracted from my book Adrienne Rich, which is to be published by Sage in October this year...What I have tried to do for the paper is to track one thread explored by the book, which I feel runs through the whole span of Rich's thought, a thread which links desire, passion, and the body - to politics, to activism, and to the writing of poetry. Writing poetry, above all, involves a willingness to let the unconscious speak - a willingness to listen within for the whispers that tell of what we know, even thou ...
    Related: adrienne, adrienne rich, natural order, unconscious mind, feminism
  • Adrienne Rich - 1,720 words
    ... s Rich's breadth, complexity and multidimensionality, in focusing on a fragment of a much larger statement when she states categorically that 'women's supposed "complicated, pain-enduring, multipleasured physicality" hardly seems a very hopeful basis on which to build resistance to their social subordination...' (14) Well no, it wouldn't be, if that were actually what Rich was proposing. I turn to a fragment from Integrity, from A Wild Patience to illustrate something of the complexity to be found in the poetry This extract is from 'Integrity', collected in A Wild Patience: Anger and tenderness: my selves. And now I can believe they breathe in me as angels, not polarities. Anger and tend ...
    Related: adrienne, adrienne rich, social status, face value, complexity
  • American Women During Wwii - 1,832 words
    American Women During Wwii American Women During World War II. America's entry into World War II posed opportunities for American women domestically, yet paradoxically heightened fears in the polity about the exact role that women should adopt during wartime. A central issue that dominated women's lives during this period was how to combine the private sphere of the home, with the new demands of the war economy in the public sphere. Women made significant gains in the military, the war economy and in some cases, in terms of political influence. Yet these gains were misleading for policy makers utilised the female workforce for short-term gains during war, with a long-term goal of seeing wome ...
    Related: american, american society, american women, black women, employed women, married women, men and women
  • Ana Castillo - 573 words
    Ana Castillo Chicana poet and writer Ana Castillo was born and raised in Chicago, but has spent most of her writing career studying her Mestiza heritage. In her first novel, The Mixquiahuala Letters (1986), Castillo explores the relationship between two women who travel to Mexico in search of a better understanding of their place in both the U.S. and Mexican societies. The novel, written in the form of letters between the two women, is considered the landmark novel that made Castillo a leading Chicana feminista writer, winning the American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation. Castillo's interest in race and gender issues can be traced through her writing career, culminating in Mas ...
    Related: castillo, american book, before columbus, gender issues, segment
  • Analysis On Bulgaria - 4,272 words
    Analysis On Bulgaria External historical events often changed Bulgaria's national boundaries in its first century of existence, natural terrain features defined most boundaries after 1944, and no significant group of people suffered serious economic hardship because of border delineation. Postwar Bulgaria contained a large percentage of the ethnic Bulgarian people, although numerous migrations into and out of Bulgaria occurred at various times. None of the country's borders was officially disputed in 1991, although nationalist Bulgarians continued to claim that Bulgaria's share of Macedonia--which it shared with both Yugoslavia and Greece--was less than just because of the ethnic connection ...
    Related: bulgaria, district court, separation of church and state, public transportation, music
  • Antigone And Creon - 1,144 words
    Antigone And Creon Issue of male authority and challenges to that authority in the play "Antigone". In the play "Antigone" by Sophocles, Creon and Antigone have distinct conflicting values. Antigone first demonstrates feminist logic when she chooses to challenge a powerful male establishment. This establishment is personified by her uncle Creon, who is newly crowned as the King of Thebes. Creon poses to be a major authority figure in a patriarchal society. Creon's regard for the laws of the city causes him to abandon all other beliefs. He feels that all should obey the laws set forth by him, even if other beliefs, moral or religious, state otherwise. Antigone, on the other hand, holds the be ...
    Related: antigone, creon, sophocles antigone, death sentence, first person
  • Antigone By Sophocles - 1,163 words
    Antigone By Sophocles Name: Nilima R. Patel Student Number: 9714937 T.A.: Nanette Morton Professor: Anne Milne. Date: 26th July, 2000. Issue of male authority and challenges to that authority in the play Antigone. In the play Antigone by Sophocles, Creon and Antigone have distinct conflicting values. Antigone first demonstrates feminist logic when she chooses to challenge a powerful male establishment. This establishment is personified by her uncle Creon, who is newly crowned as the King of Thebes. Creon poses to be a major authority figure in a patriarchal society. Creon's regard for the laws of the city causes him to abandon all other beliefs. He feels that all should obey the laws set for ...
    Related: antigone, sophocles, sophocles antigone, first person, point of view
  • Awakening By Kate Chopin - 1,585 words
    Awakening By Kate Chopin "Every step which she took toward relieving herself from obligations added to her strength and expansion as an individual" (93) The Awakening by Kate Chopin introduces the reader to the life of Edna Pontellier, a woman with an independent nature, searching for her true identity in a patriarchal society that expects women to be nothing more than devoted wives and nurturing mothers. In this paper I will describe Ednas journey of self-discovery and explain why her struggle for independence is no easy task. I will also discuss the relationship Edna has with two other main women characters and describe how these women conform or rebel against a society with many social co ...
    Related: awakening, chopin, kate, kate chopin, the awakening
  • Betham - 1,157 words
    Betham The story of Doctor Faustus is a familiar myth, in which the main character sells his soul , makes a deal with the devil, for something he speciously holds more valuable. There are many versions of this story in our culture, and it would take quite a time to make note of them all. Most people will have seen or heard one of the various stories in the for of a book, play, movie, or television show. The original story of Doctor Faustus, as created by Christopher Marlow, was prevalent to society at the time because it spoke to people's growing dizzy awareness of their possibilities and capabilities at this time. By that explanation it seems that the classic Marlow play, Doctor Faustus, wo ...
    Related: marilyn monroe, main character, power over, persona, societal
  • Billy Budd Criminal Without A Crime - 1,317 words
    Billy Budd - Criminal Without a Crime How would you feel if you were told you cheated on a test, that you really did not, by a teacher who hated you, and will be expelled because of it? Herman Melvilles Billy Budd relates an allegory of the righteous versus the reprobate by symbolizing Billy Budd, John Claggart, and Captain Vere as Jesus Christ, Lucifer, and God. The protagonist in the novel is Billy Budd. The experiences that Billy undergoes throughout the novel parallel what Jesus Christ endured in his life. Melville characterizes Billy Budd as an innocent man physically and mentally. The first feature sailors would notice about Billy were his schoolboy features, with blond hair and blue e ...
    Related: billy, billy budd, budd, crime, criminal
  • Bradstreet Feminism - 673 words
    Bradstreet Feminism As a female in a highly patriarchal society, Anne Bradstreet uses the reverse psychology technique to prove the point of her belief of unfair and unequal treatment of women in her community. Women who wrote stepped outside their appropriate sphere, and those who actually published their work frequently faced social censure. Compounding this social pressure, many women faced crushing workloads and struggled with lack of leisure for writing. Others suffered from an unequal access to education, while others were dealing with the sense of intellectual inferiority offered to them from virtually every authoritative voice, that voice usually being male. Bradstreet was raised in ...
    Related: anne bradstreet, bradstreet, feminism, women's rights, declaration of independence
  • Changing Job Roles - 3,044 words
    Changing Job Roles Introduction This paper is the result of research into and reflection on the roles carried out by those who are responsible for managing the 'people' function within organisations. Whether these incumbents are called personnel or HR managers is not necessarily important; it is however critical to give recognition to the complexity of the task that faces those who have to take responsibility for this function. This paper raises two inter-related issues. First, in what sorts of activities do personnel managers decide to invest time and energy? Are the old reliables of recruitment, training and employee relations the key tasks of the 1990s or are other issues more important? ...
    Related: management role, global information, private sector, career development, evaluation
  • Chinese Society - 1,573 words
    Chinese Society China Paper CHINESE SOCIETY Even since the dramatic post-1949 changes in China regarding the role of women, China has remained paternalistic in it's attitudes and social reality. The land reform, which was intended to create a more balanced economic force in marriage, was the beginning of governmental efforts to pacify women, with no real social effect. Communist China needed to address the woman question. Since women wanted more equality, and equality is doled out from the hands of those in power,capitalism was examined. The economic issues of repressed Chinese women were focused on the Land Act and the Marriage Act of 1950. The Land reform succeeded in eliminating the exten ...
    Related: chinese, chinese society, chinese women, family member, birth control
  • Coming Out Of Gay Men And Lesbians - 1,147 words
    Coming Out Of Gay Men And Lesbians "Coming Out" of Gay Men and Lesbians "Coming out" is a means of identifying one's sexual orientation as gay, lesbian, or bisexual. At its most basic, "coming out of the closet," means being honest with those around you - friends, family, colleagues, and so forth - about your sexual orientation, about whom you are. It also means acknowledging one's sexual orientation to self. Such disclosure is an ongoing, lifelong process rather than a one-time event. New personal, social, and professional situations require gay men and lesbians to make decisions about the degree to which they can be open about their sexual orientation (Morrow, 1996). Sexual orientation is ...
    Related: mental health, identity development, psychological adjustment, abuse, turbulent
  • Coming To The New World - 1,119 words
    Coming To The New World Coming to the New World was a major advancement in the lives of many Spanish, French, and English people between the years of 1942-1629. The migration effected the lives dramatically. They will come to see that in the coming years almost everything will change from religion to their types of settlement. The role of religion was very important, for it had an immense power over the European society. Christianity converted all of Europe including the Spanish, French, and English. Christian doctrine provided a common understanding of God. The church provided authority and discipline in the society. Every village had a church, which thought that Satan constantly challenged ...
    Related: religious conversion, catholic church, king phillip, aztec, netherlands
  • Conventionality Vs Instinct In Daisy Miller And The Awakening - 1,540 words
    Conventionality Vs. Instinct In Daisy Miller And The Awakening. Second Term Essay Henry James's Daisy Miller and Kate Chopin's The Awakening were first published twenty-one years apart, the former in 1878 and the latter in 1899. Despite the gap of more than two decades, however, the two works evince a similarity of thought and intent that is immediately evident in their main themes. Both works display characters whose lives have been governed almost solely by the conventions of their respective societies. Furthermore, both works also attempt to demonstrate to the reader what happens when these conventions are challenged by individual instincts, which more often than not are in direct contrad ...
    Related: awakening, daisy, daisy miller, instinct, miller, the awakening
  • Conventionality Vs Instinct In Daisy Miller And The Awakening - 1,562 words
    ... gin to make themselves felt. She begins to feel an attraction towards Robert Lebrun, and this becomes the catalyst for her internal struggle between conventionality and instinct. It is unthinkable for Edna, a married woman, to become involved with Robert. Her duty is to her husband and children. Her attraction for Robert, however, is too strong to allow her to simply dismiss him. She begins to contemplate the unthinkable, and thus begins the struggle between the conventions of her world and her new-found instincts. Her rebellion against conventionality does not end with her feeling for Robert, however, but spills over into other facets of her life. Thus Robert becomes the means through w ...
    Related: awakening, daisy, daisy miller, instinct, miller, the awakening
  • Dead White Males Essay - 1,362 words
    Dead White Males Essay Q1. The two opposing ideologies in this play are liberal humanism and post-structuralism. How are they represented? How does the play operate to position the audience to finally prefer one above the other? Dead White Males is a play about a sexually deprived lecturer, Dr Grant Swain, who attempts and almost succeeds in bedding one of his students, Angela Judd, by utilising his position in the university, and by imbuing his views upon his students. Alongside this plot is the conflict between two ideologies, liberal humanism and post-structuralism. Angela, the main character of the play is compelled to make a choice between post-structuralism represented by Dr Swain, and ...
    Related: happy marriage, opening scene, main character, dislike, casting
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