Live chat

Research paper topics, free example research papers

Free research papers and essays on topics related to: auto industry

  • 24 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2
  • Abc Electric Company - 1,293 words
    Abc Electric Company Introduction ABC Electric has been in business since 1970. The company makes hand-held arc welders its primary customers are construction firms, shipbuilders, auto-repair shops, and "self-help" amateurs. The company has 30% of the current market share along with four other competitors it has an annual sales of $800 million. The company has a satisfied customer-base. Although, their products are priced above the competitors, customers prefer ABC's welders due to their superior finish, reliability, and durability. Recently, demand for hand-held welders in the U.S. was steadily growing at a rate of 7% rate annually but has currently drop. However, demands are growing in the ...
    Related: electric, electric company, auto industry, bargaining power, disastrous
  • Auto Competition - 1,007 words
    Auto Competition Auto Competition Intro When an auto manufacturer needs to cut costs it will sometimes look for help from another manufacturer. This process results in a merging between companies in order to benefit one another. Companies may merge to be cost efficient or even to gain entry into another market segment. Either way, manufacturers try to gain instant results by merging. Auto manufacturers compete with each other to give consumers the state of the art safety systems that they demand. Parents are becoming more concerned about their family's safety with the lifesaving abilities of airbags. Consumers are looking at airbags as a very important option when making a vehicle purchasing ...
    Related: auto, auto industry, ford motor company, automotive industry, combining
  • Auto Competition - 1,034 words
    ... ince buyers that it can produce quality cars in another particular market segment. By merging with another company, a company can build upon it's know reputation. Ford says Lincoln stands for American luxury; Volvo means thoughtful and understated, Jaguar suggests refined power, and Aston Martin is a most exclusive club (Holstein). Ford is looking to these names to catapult them to the rank of the world's dominant maker of luxury vehicles. In 1998 Ford sold 250,000 luxury vehicles worldwide and Volvo sold about 400,000. If Jaguar continues to expand and the numbers from Ford and Volvo are combined, Ford should be able to sell about 1 million luxury cars per year soon after 2000 (Holstein ...
    Related: auto, auto industry, aston martin, automotive industry, item
  • Automobile Industry - 1,153 words
    Automobile Industry There is no industry more present in the world-wide community than the automobile industry. The automobile has changed the lives, culture, and economy of the people and nations that manufacture and demand them. Ever since the late 1800s when the first "modern" car was invented by Benz and Daimler in Germany, the industry has grown into a billion dollar industry affecting so many aspects of our lives. There are more than 400 million passenger cars alone on the roads today. During the early part of the twentieth century, the United States was home to more than 90 percent of the worlds automotive industry, but has shrunk to about 20 percent in todays world. This drastic chan ...
    Related: auto industry, automobile, automobile industry, automotive industry, great lakes
  • Automobile Industry - 1,083 words
    ... industry. Consumers are now demanding lower prices and more luxuries in their cars. To deal with this consumer demand, auto manufacturers have begun by lowering employee pay rolls, replacing employees with machines and more capable workers to improve productivity, and many times merge with other companies to better compete in the market. Production growth has been about 2-3 percent for the past few years in the auto industry, and hopefully will continue by implementing new cost efficient procedures. American industries, competing in the international markets, face the problem of a strong dollar compared to the weaker currencies of foreign nations. This means that American cars to foreign ...
    Related: auto industry, automobile, automobile industry, carbon monoxide, global positioning system
  • Crimes Of Cia And Opec In 1975 - 1,515 words
    Crimes Of Cia And Opec In 1975 The Crimes Of The CIA OPEC Stalling On New Price Oil 1. Intro A. Why the events were important B. The basic problems that came with these events C. Why they could have happened 2. Paragraph 1 A. Rockefeller Papers B. How it influenced the people about the accusations 3. Paragraph 2 A. CIA incidents B. What they were accused of C. The accusations 4. Paragraph 3 A. OPEC B. Describe the events that lead up to this C. Why OPEC decided to do this D. US response to the oil prices 5. Paragraph 4 A. How these tie together or how they don't B. Influences on society C. Over all reactions 6. Conclusion A. Bring together all thoughts B. How some of this could have been sol ...
    Related: opec, government officials, south east, washington post, till
  • Employee Benefits Required By Law - 3,418 words
    Employee Benefits Required by Law Employee Benefits Required by Law The legally required employee benefits constitute nearly a quarter of the benefits package that employers provide. These benefits include employer contributions to Social Security, unemployment insurance, and workers compensation insurance. Altogether such benefits represent about twenty-one and half percent of payroll costs. Social Security Social Security is the federally administered insurance system. Under current federal laws, both employer and employee must pay into the system, and a certain percentage of the employees salary is paid up to a maximum limit. Social Security is mandatory for employees and employers. The m ...
    Related: employee, employee benefits, security benefits, working women, federal government
  • History Of The Automobile - 788 words
    History of the Automobile History of the Automobile Automobiles are one of the most important and prominent inventions possibly ever created. Without automobiles our lives would be completely changed and different. Automobiles changed the way people traveled and lived. Without cars there would be no drive-ins, drive-thru fast food restaurants, and shopping centers. People depend on their cars whether they're earning their living, or traveling to their dream vacation spot. The United States is the leading producer of automobiles and is often called the "Nation On Wheels." The U.S has become very dependent on cars for transportation. Racing automobiles is also a very popular sport which attrac ...
    Related: automobile, history, electric cars, food restaurants, manufacture
  • Identity Crisis - 1,155 words
    Identity Crisis The American people have a serious identity crisis. Its rare while in the country to hear someone say that they are American. People say that they are Irish, Scottish, German, Italian, African, English, West Indian, etc. Often people are a combination of these. For black Americans it becomes even more complicated. Many want to identify as African but others would never dream of such a thing because its so foreign to them. I was speaking to a man at a party I had at my apartment. He was telling me about how he plays African drums, traveling around to different towns and performing. He had even been to my part of Cape Cod, Wellfleet. I asked him if he was African and his reply ...
    Related: black identity, crisis, identity crisis, federal government, black students
  • Labor Issues - 2,199 words
    ... e people asked felt that unions are no longer necessary in todays American society. Furthermore, one in five of the sample population taking part in this survey were union members, and of these, 25% agreed that unions are no longer important (American Labor, 1998). The disparity in conclusions between these reports only begins to show the uncertainty facing the labor movement. Who Benefits From Unions? Before accounting for the decline in union enrollment, it suffices to consider who is impacted by todays unions? Literature is consistent in that members of strong unions tend to make more money and receive better benefits than non-union workers in the same jobs (Dessler, 1997). While unio ...
    Related: american labor, issues relating, labor, labor issues, labor movement, labor unions, organized labor
  • Labor Relations - 1,210 words
    ... fight this latest trend. Management Approach Corporations and the management teams that run them, exist for the primary purpose of making a profit. These corporations are not social entities who exist for the betterment of there work force. Rather they are business entities that exist for the financial betterment of the owners and share holders. The interest of the business in many cases goes against the interest of the union. One is concerned about maximizing profits to the business the other is concerned about maximizing profits to its members. Wages While it is true that union workers have better wage scales than their non union counterparts, it must also be understood, at what cost ...
    Related: fair labor, fair labor standards act, labor, labor movement, labor relations
  • Monopolies A Case Study - 1,106 words
    ... . They were led by Lenin on the one hand and Kautsky on the other. Though Lenin was the radical and the latter the moderate, Kautsky set forward his theory of "hyper imperialism" by which he stated that the monopolization of capital would lead to a more direct takeover of the state apparatus. He predicted that all monopolists from every industry would unite and directly run the state from a quasi-democratic government. Although essentially political in nature the theory reflect in today terms, the phenomenon of merger. It would not stop here for Kautsky, who went on to theorize that the phenomenon would reach international proportions. A "One World" economy and government would be create ...
    Related: case study, auto industry, raw materials, less developed countries, export
  • Napster - 1,340 words
    Napster If you want to know where a Silicon Valley-ite stands in the ongoing war for the soul of the Internet, just ask him or her what the buzzword is these days. Many will tell you it is "B2B," a backslapping shorthand for e-schemes directed to the "business to business" market. But those who still believe that the Internet revolution is still a seething, evolving, paradigm-busting phenomenon will offer a different buzzword: "Napster" (Levy 68). This new term pertains to a specific digital-music program, the start-up company built around the free software and the full effect brought about by its crazy popularity (Ante 197,198). 19-year-old Shawn Fanning began writing the code so he could s ...
    Related: napster, free software, internet revolution, musical composition, library
  • Rivethead Social Issues Of Work - 1,685 words
    Rivethead; Social Issues Of Work Introduction Ben Hampers book Rivethead; Tales From The Assembly Line is a gritty in your face account of a factory workers struggles against his factory, his co-workers, and the time clock. Hamper makes no apologies for any of his actions, many of which were unorthodox or illegal. Instead he justifies them in a way that makes the factory workers strife apparent to those who have never set foot on an assembly line and wouldnt have the vaguest idea how much blood, sweat and tears go into the products we take for granted everyday. Rivethead is an account of the entire life of Author Ben Hamper, from his long family lineage of shoprats and his catholic school up ...
    Related: social issues, human soul, manufacturing process, auto industry, tasks
  • Tax Increment Financing: Contrasting Effects - 2,134 words
    Tax Increment Financing: Contrasting Effects suburbanization in america Limmer (1) AHousing is an outward expression of the inner human nature; no society can be understood apart from the residences of its members.@ That is a quote from the suburban historian Kenneth T. Jackson, from his magnificent piece on suburbanization Crabgrass Frontier. Suburbanization has been probably the most significant factor of change in U.S. cities over the last 50 years, and began 150 years ago. It represents Aa reliance upon the private automobile, upward mobility, the separation of the family into nuclear units, the widening division between work and leisure, and a tendency toward racial and economic exclusi ...
    Related: contrasting, increment, interstate highway, beverly hills, component
  • The Current Oil Crisis And How It Is Affecting The Economy - 2,581 words
    The Current Oil Crisis And How It Is Affecting The Economy Report on the Current Oil Crisis, How it is Affecting the Economy, and Some Possible Outcomes November 14, 2000 With the current spike in oil prices, many American consumers have asked, "what is going on?" In order to fully understand the current situation and how it is affecting the economy one must look at a variety of factors including: the history of oil crisis in the United States, causes of the current situation, and possible outcomes for the future. It is only after meticulous research in these topics that one is prepared to answer the question, "what is the best possible solution to the oil crisis?" Although many critics have ...
    Related: affecting, crisis, current situation, economy, issues involved
  • The Industrial Revolution Was Dawning In The United States At - 2,336 words
    ... day-to-day welfare of their members and should not become involved in politics. He also was convinced that socialism would not succeed in the United States but that practical demands for higher wages and fewer working hours could achieve the goal of a better life for working people. This was known as "bread and butter" unionism. There was one outstanding exception to the pragmatic "bread and butter" approach to unionism which characterized most of American labor. This was the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), a revolutionary labor union launched in Chicago in 1905 under the leadership of Eugene V. Debs. The IWW the overthrow of capitalism through strikes, boycotts and sabotage. Par ...
    Related: communist revolution, industrial revolution, industrial workers, industrial workers of the world iww, states congress, united states congress
  • The Making Of Automobiles Started In The Year 1770 In 1770 A Man Named Nicholas - 998 words
    ... let and Ernest Archdeacon took a trip driving the steam tricycle. They drove for 286 miles in 15 days. And in 1891 Emile Levassor built a motor car with a mid-mounted Daimler engine, later to be laid out in the front and under the hood. Panhard et Levassor in 1892 began to sell their cars to the public. A four seated dog cart priced at L200, and a wagonette at L212. Solid rubber tires cost an extra L20. Charles Duryea began to build a one-cylinder automobile in the United States in 1893. In 1894 Karl Benz introduced a new four-wheeled vehicle called the Velo. Benz built 135 cars in 1895 over forty of them drove the streets of France. In 1896 Charles E. and J. Frank Duryea together found ...
    Related: first year, nicholas, energy crisis, ford motor company, viper
  • The Roots Of Affirmative Action Can Be Traced Back To The Passage Of The 1964 Civil Rights Act Where Legislation Redefined Pu - 1,735 words
    The roots of affirmative action can be traced back to the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act where legislation redefined public and private behavior. The act states that to discriminate in private is legal, but anything regarding business or public discrimination is illegal ("Affirmative" 13). There are two instances when opposing affirmative action might seem the wrong thing to do. Even these two cases don't justify the use of affirmative action. First is the nobility of the cause to help others. Second, affirmative action was a great starter for equality in the work place. The most promanite variable in deciding affirmative action as right or wrong, is whether or not society is going to ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, civil rights, civil rights act, legislation
  • The Technological Revolution - 1,062 words
    The Technological Revolution Technological Changes of the Past and Present The technology which surrounds almost everyone in the modern society, affects both work and leisure activities. Technology contains information that many would rather it did not have. It influences minds in good and bad ways, and it allows people to share information which they would otherwise not be able to attain. Even if a person does not own a computer or have credit cards, there is information on a computer somewhere about everyone. The technology which is just now beginning to be manipulated and harnessed is affecting the minds of small children and adolescents in ways that could be harmful. It is affecting our ...
    Related: technological, social relationships, natural resources, middle ages, amazing
  • 24 results found, view research papers on page:
  • 1
  • 2