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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: palsy

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  • Cerebral Palsy - 908 words
    Cerebral Palsy Katherine Dillon Child Psychology Cerebral Palsy (CP) is a term used to describe disorders of movement that result from injury to the brain. It is a problem of muscle coordination. The muscles themselves are not effected but the brain is unable to send the appropriate signals necessary to instruct the muscles when to contract or relax. Cerebral Palsy can be caused by numerous problems occurring in the prenatal period, prematurity, labor and delivery complication in the newborn period due to genetic or chromosomal abnormality to the brain may not develop in the typical way. Some environmental factors such as drugs metabolic problems, and placental dysfunction may also lead to C ...
    Related: cerebral, cerebral palsy, palsy, technical support, resource center
  • Tommy Is An Eighteen Yearold Male Who Was Born With Cerebral Palsy And Mild Mental Retardation He Is Diagnosed As Right Hemip - 434 words
    Tommy is an eighteen year-old male who was born with Cerebral Palsy and Mild Mental Retardation. He is diagnosed as right - hemiparetic which effects his right leg, arm and hand. Tommy is ambulatory, however, his gait is short and uneven which manifests in a noticeable limp and the dragging of his right leg. He has trouble lifting over ten pounds and walking up stairs but can sit, stand and bend without pain for long periods of time. Tommy is a full-time student at the Hungerford school where he will remain until he is twenty-one. Tommy says he really enjoys school and most subjects, however, he does not enjoy reading and writing. He tells me that those are his weak areas but that he really ...
    Related: cerebral, cerebral palsy, diagnosed, eighteen, mental retardation, mild, palsy
  • Alternative Education - 612 words
    Alternative Education Alternative education caters to multifarious groups of students or unprofessional classified according to their needs and circumstances in life. Alternative education programs were designed because of pressures from concerned parents, teachers, students and government officials to ameliorate substandard education and dangerous environment in most public schools. Seeing its benefits, educators and educational institutions broaden the scope of this alternative to promote education and extend it to working adults to further their training and professionalism. Its main goal is to provide opportunities for millions of students, achievers or not, across the United States to m ...
    Related: alternative education, education programs, home schooling, safe schools, esteem
  • Bioethics - 2,379 words
    ... bes, where it travels to the uterus (Leone, Reproductive 13). Another method, "gamete intrafallopian transfer" (GIFT), is done by injecting sperm and an unfertilized egg into a fallopian tube, at which time conception and implantation will occur (Leone, Reproductive 13). Lastly is the "zona cracking" method. This technique involves piercing the outer layer of the egg and placing a single sperm cell within the egg, then embedding the fertilized egg into the woman (Leone, Reproductive 13). There is yet another well-known fashion for infertile couples to conceive a child - surrogate motherhood. In this process, the fertilized egg of one woman is allowed to develop in the womb of another. Su ...
    Related: national bioethics advisory, handicapped children, bill clinton, human life, agony
  • Bioethics - 2,379 words
    ... bes, where it travels to the uterus (Leone, Reproductive 13). Another method, "gamete intrafallopian transfer" (GIFT), is done by injecting sperm and an unfertilized egg into a fallopian tube, at which time conception and implantation will occur (Leone, Reproductive 13). Lastly is the "zona cracking" method. This technique involves piercing the outer layer of the egg and placing a single sperm cell within the egg, then embedding the fertilized egg into the woman (Leone, Reproductive 13). There is yet another well-known fashion for infertile couples to conceive a child - surrogate motherhood. In this process, the fertilized egg of one woman is allowed to develop in the womb of another. Su ...
    Related: national bioethics advisory, human race, down syndrome, kurt vonnegut, barrier
  • Cerebral Pasy Vs Muscular Dystrophy - 780 words
    Cerebral Pasy Vs. Muscular Dystrophy Muscular dystrophy is a rare inherited muscle disease in which the muscle fibers are unusually susceptible to damage. The muscles, primarily the voluntary muscles, become progressively weaker. In the late stages of muscular dystrophy, muscle fibers often are replaced by fat and connective tissue. There are several types of muscular dystrophy. The various types of the disease affect more than 50,000 Americans. Many are associated with specific genetic abnormalities.The most common muscular dystrophies appear to be due to a genetic deficiency of the muscle protein dystrophin. These types of the disease are called dystrophinopathies. They include: Duchenne' ...
    Related: cerebral, cerebral palsy, dystrophy, muscular, muscular dystrophy
  • Dementia - 1,524 words
    ... syndrome in DS (Beach, 1987). Later it was discovered that EOAD and DS share a common genetic pathology on chromosome 21 (see risk factors). Research in dementia began to revive in the early sixties. New causes of the dementia syndrome were recognized including progressive supranuclear palsy and normal pressure hydrocephalus. Prior to the 1960s dementia was still viewed as a chronic, irreversible and untreatable condition (Mahendra, 1984, P. 14). Accordingly, in the 1960s several writers in Europe called for a revision of the concept and emphasized that irreversibility should not be viewed as an essential feature of dementia. Another important change that took place in the 1960s concerne ...
    Related: dementia, transmitted diseases, based research, higher level, miscellaneous
  • Dementiaa - 4,130 words
    Dementiaa IntrodWhat is Dementia ?uction Dementia is an organic brain syndrome which results in global cognitive impairments. Dementia can occur as a result of a variety of neurological diseases. Some of the more well known dementing diseases include Alzheimers disease (AD), multi-infarct dementia (MID), and Huntingtons disease (HD). Throughout this essay the emphasis will be placed on AD (also known as dementia of the Alzheimers type, and primary degenerative dementia), because statistically it is the most significant dementing disease occurring in over 50% of demented patients (see epidemiology). The clinical picture in dementia is very similar to delirium, except for the course. Delirium ...
    Related: thyroid disease, higher level, alzheimers disease, staining, remaining
  • Health Maintenance Organizations - 928 words
    Health Maintenance Organizations Throughout history, America has always strived for freedom and quality of life. Wars were fought and people died to preserve these possessions. We are now in a time where we may see these ideals crumble like dust in the wind. Health Maintenance Organizations, HMOs are currently depriving millions of people from quality health acre and freedom of choice. This is occurring because people who are enrolled in HMOs are unable to choose the doctor that they want. Also patients lose the quality of care because HMOs interfere with the health care providers decisions. The Health Maintenance Organization has been proven to"sometimes interfere with physicians exercise o ...
    Related: health, health care, health maintenance, health plan, maintenance, maintenance organization, organizations
  • Imagine Waking Up Every Morning And Knowing That You Have Been Infected With - 1,464 words
    Imagine waking up every morning and knowing that you have been infected with the AIDS virus, and could die in a couple of years. What if their was something you could do to slow the affects of the virus to live a longer life expectancy? Would you inhale a joint of marijuana, even if it was prescribed by a physician? I believe the majority of people would take the chance to live longer, especially if it meant that they could see a new smiling face each day, another pleasant cheer of laughter to be heard, and a bright colorful sunset to be seen. "Marijuana is a relatively mild, nonaddictive drug with hallucinogenic properties, obtained from the flowering tops, stems, and leaves of the hemp pla ...
    Related: infected, waking, life expectancy, aids epidemic, lethal
  • Kim Campbell, Canadas First Female Prime Minister, Rose Quickly In Her Political Standings Reaching, What She Would Find To B - 731 words
    Kim Campbell, Canada's first female Prime Minister, rose quickly in her political standings reaching, what she would find to be the height of her career only seven years after entering politics. It appeared like the loss of the 1993 election and the all around destruction of the Progressive Conservative party was completely Kim Campbell's fault however actually was a joint effort by Brian Mulroney and Kim Campbell. Kim Campbell rose so quickly in her political status that she did not have the experience that most of the others MPs had at her level. The Tories were finishing their second term in power and the people of Canada were displeased with Brain Mulroney by the time of his resignation. ...
    Related: prime, prime minister, american company, canadian encyclopedia, palsy
  • Life Or Death: Who Chooses - 2,215 words
    ... e death for another while life is all we ourselves know? Methods are being developed to diagnose certain defects in the infants of mothers at risk before the infant is born. The fluid around the fetus can be sampled and tested in a very complicated fashion. If we kill infants with confidential defects before they are born, why not after birth, why not any human being we declare defective? It is no surprise of course for many of us to learn that in hospitals across North American Continent such decisions affecting the newborn and the very elderly or those with incurable disease, are being made. What is a defect, what is a congenital defect? Hitler considered being 1/4 Jewish was a congeni ...
    Related: right to life, informed consent, women in canada, north american, declare
  • Lyme Disease Lyme Arthritis Lyme Disease Is A Ticktransmitted Inflammatory Disorder Characterized By An Early Focal Skin Lesi - 1,265 words
    Lyme Disease Lyme Arthritis ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Lyme disease is a tick-transmitted inflammatory disorder characterized by an early focal skin lesion, and subsequently a growing red area on the skin (erythema chronicum migrans or ECM). The disorder may be followed weeks later by neurological, heart or joint abnormalities. Symptomatology ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ The first symptom of Lyme disease is a skin lesion. Known as erythema chronicum migrans, or ECM, this usually begins as a red discoloration (macule) or as an elevated round spot (papule). The skin lesion usually appears on an extremity or on the trunk, especially the thigh, buttock or the under arm. This spot expands, often with central clearing, to ...
    Related: arthritis, characterized, disorder, focal, inflammatory, lyme, rheumatoid arthritis
  • Marijuana - 3,171 words
    ... ation, dyspepsia, heart burn, and ulceration. These are only the gastrointestinal effects. There are hair effects, skin effects, and muscle and nerve effects to these drugs. Drugs administered to treat the side effects of nausea, and vomiting are mostly ineffective. However, there are reports that state that THC, taken in a capsule or in a cigarette, does reduce nausea and vomiting. The controversy is that some patients experienced hallucinations while taking the drug. The hallucinations were experienced perhaps because too much of the drug was taken at one time. The question that is brought up is How much is an effective dose? First, the way the drug is taken varies on the individual. S ...
    Related: legalize marijuana, legalizing marijuana, marijuana, medical use of marijuana, human behavior
  • Medicinal Marijuana - 985 words
    Medicinal Marijuana Marijuana when used in the medical sense is beneficial to not only the patients health but to their financial status as well. In this report youll see many reasons why we believe this. Medical marijuana is used in many treatments. We are not obviously the only people who believe this either. In the last 20 years, 36 states have passed some form of legislation recognizing the medical value of marijuana. In 1996, voters in both Arizona and California passed laws allowing the medical use of marijuana. In 1998 Alaska, Washington and Oregon passed medical use marijuana laws, and in 1999 Maine passed a similar law (Grinspoon, 5). The chronic effects of marijuana are of greater ...
    Related: marijuana, marijuana laws, medical marijuana, medical use of marijuana, medicinal, medicinal marijuana
  • Music Therapy - 1,527 words
    Music Therapy Music Therapy During the past thirty years, concepts in the mental health profession have undergone continuous and dramatic changes. A relatively new type of therapy is musical therapy, which incorporates music into the healing process. Music therapy also is changing, and its concepts, procedures, and practices need constant reevaluation in order to meet new concepts of psychiatric treatment. The idea of music as a healing influence which could affect health and behavior is as least as old as the writings of Aristotle and Plato. The 20th century discipline began after World War I and World War II when community musicians of all types, both amateur and professional, went to Vete ...
    Related: american music, background music, music, music therapy, therapy
  • Nicholas G - 956 words
    Nicholas G. B.D. 5-3-82 Eighth Grade Examiner: Suzan Carter Testing Dates:7-13-97, 7-19-97, 7-23-97 The purpose of this report is to give Mr. and Mrs. G., Nicholas G.s parents, a more complete and up to date picture of Nicks academic skill levels. Nick is a neighbor of the examiner, and both parents and examinee have cherrfully volunteered Nick as testing subjuect for the examiners Diagnostic Testing class. Nicholas has been in the Special Day Class Program, attending Santa Barbara public schools since kindergarten. Nicholas is developementally delayed and has mild cerebral palsy. Nick's parents report that he has made good academic and social skills progress, especially in the past two year ...
    Related: nicholas, cerebral palsy, first grade, academic achievement, achievement
  • Parkinsons Disease - 699 words
    Parkinsons Disease Parkinson Disease Damage to Broca's area in the frontal lobe causes difficulty in speaking and writing, a problem known as Broca's aphasia. Injury to Wernicke's area in the left temporal lobe results in an inability to comprehend spoken language, called Wernicke's aphasia. Cerebral palsy is a broad term for brain damage sustained close to birth that permanently affects motor function. The damage may take place either in the developing fetus, during birth, or just after birth and is the result of the faulty development or breaking down of motor pathways. Cerebral palsy is non-progressive that is, it does not worsen with time. During childhood development, the brain is parti ...
    Related: parkinson disease, parkinson's disease, childhood development, side effects, temporal
  • People With Disabilities - 521 words
    People With Disabilities My Left Foot, The Elephant Man, and Mask are all movies about people with disabilities. These three movies depict the lives of three men and the way society treats them and their disabilities. My Left Foot is about a man who can only use his left foot because of cerebral palsy and alcoholism. The Elephant Man is about a man who has very large, severe tumors on his whole body. Mask is about a young man who has a very large face that looks almost like he's wearing a mask. Society doesn't realize how important the little things are to people with disabilities. The Elephant Man, John Merrick, was displayed in a freak show as a beast. He was really a very gentle man who l ...
    Related: cerebral palsy, funny, beast, draw
  • Psychology: Use Of Language - 1,225 words
    Psychology: Use Of Language Jennifer Mull Psychology Human speech makes possible the expression and communication of thoughts, needs, and emotions through vocalization in the form of words. It is a process whose specialized adaptations differentiate it from the mere making of sounds--a capacity humans share with most animals. In addition to the capacity for laryngeal production of sound (which some animals also possess), speech requires a resonance system for modulation and amplification of that sound and an articulation process for the shaping of that sound into the communally established word-symbols of meaning that constitute the language of a given culture. (Dean Edell) The use of langua ...
    Related: cerebral palsy, hearing loss, mental retardation, parental, dystrophy
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