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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: pacifism

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  • Pacifism And Christianity - 804 words
    Pacifism And Christianity Jesus spoke of it, Kahlil Gibran wrote about it, Mahatma Ghandi demonstrated about it, The Beatles sang about it and most importantly is has been shown through the ages by humble deeds - Peace that is. The way to peace is through love. Love cannot be forced and it cannot be found through sloth therefore for peace to flourish it must be wanted and acted upon accordingly by the people who will grow under it. However to have peace there must be only peace, it cannot be interrupted by acts of violence or aggression and it especially cannot exist when those who are supposedly working for it also engage in violent acts on the side. In other words pacifism is the only way ...
    Related: christianity, pacifism, john lennon, ten commandments, catholicism
  • A Philosopher Of Nature - 1,482 words
    A Philosopher Of Nature A PHILOSOPHER OF NATURE December 1, 1998 Paper # 2 Intro to Philosophy Fifty years ago the single greatest philosopher walked upon this earth. How can I be so dauntless as to refer to one man as The Greatest philosopher? The answer is simple. All philosophers ask questions. Few of these questions will produce earth-shattering revelations and even fewer will change the world. Out of the handful of philosophers who have made a difference in the world I can think of only one who has, by use of an amazing mind and knowledge of complex mathematics, changed the world forever. Albert Einstein was born in Ulm Germany on March 14, 1879, and spent his youth in Munich, where his ...
    Related: philosopher, franklin d roosevelt, general theory, second world, fascination
  • A Rose, By A Vulcan Name, Would Smell As Sweet - 1,201 words
    A Rose, By A Vulcan Name, Would Smell As Sweet A Rose, By a Vulcan Name, Would Smell as Sweet. Social commentary is dangerous. In addition to risking social and political censure, the commentator must carefully convey the message. In directly addressing a problem, one risks alienating an audience before making one's point. If one indirectly approaches said problem, one may appear to lack conviction or a point. Star Trek: the Original Series takes a third path, that of allegory. Unfortunately, as the television series belongs to the science fiction genre, its social significance is often disregarded. However, upon examination, it is clear that the veiled nature of commentary in Star Trek is v ...
    Related: smell, sweet, time magazine, social situations, intolerance
  • Albert Einstein - 1,216 words
    Albert Einstein Albert Einstein Albert Einstein was one of the greatest brains ever to come to the 20th century. Einstein contributed to the 20th century more than any other scientist ever. His theory of relativity is held as the highest quality of a human thought ever to come. Albert Einstein was born on March 14, 1879 in Ulm, Wurttemberg, Germany. His family moved from Ulm to Munich and had an unsuccessful business that made them move later to Milan, Italy. His parents were dealing with electrical apparatus. At this time Albert left his German citizenship. He persuades an exam that would give him the opportunity to study electrical engineering in Zurich Polytechnic but failed to pass it. A ...
    Related: albert, albert einstein, einstein, general relativity, secondary school
  • Albert Einstein - 1,498 words
    Albert Einstein Einsteins early life; Einstein was born in Ulm, Germany on Mar. 14, 1879. Einstein's parents, who were non observant Jews, moved from Ulm to Munich when Einstein was an infant. The family business was the manufacture of electrical parts. When the business failed, in 1894, the family moved to Milan, Italy. At this time Einstein decided officially to relinquish his German citizenship. Within a year, still without having completed secondary school, Einstein failed an examination that would have allowed him to take a course of study leading to a diploma as an electrical engineer at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. He spent the next year in nearby Aarau at the continual ...
    Related: albert, albert einstein, einstein, early life, white house
  • Albert Einstien - 1,742 words
    Albert Einstien Men and Women of Science Albert Einstein Early Life Einstein was born in Ulm, Germany on Mar. 14, 1879. Einstein's parents, who were non observant Jews, moved from Ulm to Munich, Germany when Einstein was an infant. The family business was the manufacture of electrical parts. When the business failed, in 1894, the family moved to Milan, Italy. At this time Einstein decided officially to end his German citizenship. Within a year, still without having completed secondary school, Einstein failed an examination that would have allowed him to pursue a course of study leading to a diploma as an electrical engineer at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. He spent the next year ...
    Related: albert, albert einstein, men and women, theoretical physics, slightly
  • Barrons Book Notes - 5,371 words
    BARRON'S BOOK NOTES ERICH MARIA REMARQUE'S ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT ^^^^^^^^^^ERICH MARIA REMARQUE: THE AUTHOR AND HIS TIMES Born Erich Paul Remark on June 22, 1898, he grew up in a Roman Catholic family in Osnabruck in the province of Westphalia, Germany--a city in the northwest part of what is now West Germany. He adored his mother, Anna Maria, but was never close to his father, Peter. The First World War effectively shut him off from his sisters, Elfriede and Erna. Peter Remark, descended from a family that fled to Germany after the French Revolution, earned so little as a bookbinder that the family had to move 11 times between 1898 and 1912. The family's poverty drove Remarque as a ...
    Related: book notes, notes, prisoners of war, west germany, volunteer
  • Buddhism A Way To Salvation - 1,262 words
    Buddhism A Way to Salvation "Buddhism has the characteristics of what would be expected in a cosmic religions for the future: it transcends a personal God, avoids dogmas and theology, it covers both the natural and spiritual, and it is based on a religious sense aspiring from the experience of all things, natural and spiritual, as a meaningful unity." (Albert Einstein) Known as one of the worlds great religions, it is professed by over 3500,000,000 people, most of whom live in the Far East. Buddhism is based on the teachings of Siddharta Gautama, who is more commonly known as Buddha, the "Enlightened One". It was developed during the fifth and sixth centuries BCE around 535 BCE, which was t ...
    Related: buddhism, salvation, right speech, right effort, confusion
  • Causes Of War And Threats To Peace - 1,034 words
    Causes Of War And Threats To Peace War or Peace Causes of War and Threats to Peace War is one of the responses by which one society tries to reduce the capacity of another society to obtain its objectives, when one or several of these are conflicting with those of the first society. By this response, society A tries to get the society B to do what is not convenient for B, but of convenience to A. In other words, A tries to get B to do something unnatural, namely NOT to try to reach its own objectives. This is in direct contradiction with the definition of an intelligent system of a human being, and resisted by B. Societies, since they are intelligent systems (IS), always act as best they see ...
    Related: social darwinism, human history, social development, propaganda, violation
  • Dorthy Day - 1,726 words
    ... d that, in contrast with most charitable centers, no one at the Catholic Worker set about reforming them. A crucifix on the wall was the only unmistakable evidence of the faith of those welcoming them. The staff received only food, board and occasional pocket money. The Catholic Worker became a national movement. By 1936 there were 33 Catholic Worker houses spread across the country. Due to the Depression, plenty of people needed them. The Catholic Worker attitude toward those who were welcomed wasn't always appreciated. These weren't the deserving poor, it was sometimes objected, but drunkards and good-for-nothings. A visiting social worker asked Day how long the clients were permitted ...
    Related: christian life, twentieth century, catholic church, machine, japan
  • Gandhifighter Without A Sword - 631 words
    Gandhi-Fighter Without A Sword Gandhi Fighter Without a Sword Gandhi, one of the worlds greatest figures, has already become a legend. In this book Jeanette Eaton shows him as a human being. While still a young man, Gandhi adopted the austere way of living that was until the day he died. He did not want comforts and luxuries when so many of his countrymen lived in terrible poverty. He ate only the most frugal diet and in his later years wore a peasants costume. But he himself was anything but austere. Laughter was to him lifes most healing gift, even when it was directed against himself. When young Indian children become a certain age and their body is mature enough they are allowed to get m ...
    Related: sword, small town, british empire, british army, burma
  • Integrating Care And Justice: Moral Development - 2,683 words
    Integrating Care and Justice: Moral Development Matchmaker.com: Sign up now for a free trial. Date Smarter! Integrating Care and Justice: Moral Development Part One: The criticisms of Kohlberg's moral development stages seem to center around three major points, his research methods, the "regression" of stage four, and finally his goals. The first criticism that I would like to address is that of his research methods. Kohlberg is often criticized for not only his subject selection, but also the methods by which he tries to extricate data from those subjects. His initial study consisted of school boys from a private institution in Chicago. The problem with this is fairly obvious, that this doe ...
    Related: development stages, integrating, moral development, moral dilemma, everyday life
  • Little White Lie - 1,904 words
    Little White Lie Orwell & Marx Animalism vs. Marxism Every line I have written since 1936 has been written, directly or indirectly, against totalitarianism, quotes George Orwell in the preface to the 1956 Signet Classic edition of Animal Farm. The edition, which sold several millions copies, however, omitted the rest of the sentence: and for democratic Socialism, as I understand it. It is in Animal Farm, written in 1944 but not published until after World War Two in 1945, which Orwell offers a political and social doctrine whose ideas and ideols can be seen in all of his proceeding works. In an essay published in the summer of 1946 entitled Why I Write, Orwell claimed to have been motivated ...
    Related: boxer rebellion, human life, democratic socialism, orwell, josef
  • Mandela - 1,128 words
    Mandela Nelson Mandela Nelson Mandela's greatest achievements were that of turning around the African National Congress and winning the Nobel Peace prize for his fight to abolish the Apartheid system in South Africa. The African National Congress was established in 1912, and in 1919 they organized their first public action, though unfortunately it resulted in the arrest of several hundred people. Nelson Mandela joined the African National Congress in 1944, at a time when the abolishment of the Apartheid was just talk. Also in 1944, in hopes to pull younger people into the African National Congress the ANC youth league was formed. de Klerk unbanned a number of organisations including the ANC ...
    Related: mandela, nelson mandela, political rights, national congress, viable
  • Qa: Legalization Of Marijuana - 1,458 words
    Q/A: Legalization of Marijuana "Prohibition . goes beyond the bounds of reason in that it attempts to control a man's appetite by legislation and makes a crime out of things that are not crimes. "A prohibition law strikes a blow at the very principles upon which our government was founded." - Abraham Lincoln December, 1840 This pamphlet was researched and produced as a public service by the Family Council on Drug Awareness, P.O. Box 71093, LA CA 90071-0093 Q. What is Marijuana? A. "Marijuana" refers to the dried leaves and flowers of the cannabis plant,1 which contain the non-narcotic chemical THC at various potencies. It is smoked or eaten to produce the feeling of being "high." The differe ...
    Related: legalization, legalizing marijuana, marijuana, marijuana prohibition, columbia university
  • The Rise Of Hitler - 1,075 words
    The Rise Of Hitler The Rise of Hitler I. Introduction Exactly how did Hitler come into power? What drove him to become the way he was? Why did he kill all those people? In this report, Ill examine these questions and many others. II. The early years Hitler was born on April 20, 1889 at Branau am Inn in Austria-Hungary. He went by his mother's last name Schicklegruber until 1876 when he took the name Hitler. He spent much of his childhood in upper Austria linz. He had a terrible record in school. He stayed in school until 1905 when he was 16 years old. He aspired to become an artist and applied for entrance into the Vienna academy but was rejected for lack of talent. Hitler's mother passed aw ...
    Related: adolph hitler, hitler, breast cancer, german army, expanding
  • The Slaughter House Five - 5,306 words
    The Slaughter House Five THE NOVEL - THE PLOT - Billy Pilgrim, like Kurt Vonnegut, was an American soldier in Europe in the last year of World War II. If you come to know a combat veteran well- a veteran of that war, of the Korean War, or of the war in Vietnam- you will almost always find that his war experience was the single most important event in his life. The sights and scars of war remain with the soldier for the rest of his days, and his memories of death and killing help to shape whatever future career he may make. The same is true for Billy Pilgrim. What he saw and did during his six months on the battlefield and as a prisoner of war have dominated his life. Slaughterhouse-Five show ...
    Related: slaughter, slaughter house, adam and eve, brave new world, flea
  • Thesis One: In Principle A Case Can Be Made On Moral Grounds Both Supporting And Opposing Capital Punishment - 1,311 words
    Thesis One: In principle a case can be made on moral grounds both supporting and opposing capital punishment. Thesis two: Concretely and in practice, compelling arguments against capital punishment can be made on the basis of its actual administration in our society. Two different cases can be made. One is based on justice and the nature of a moral community. This leads to a defense of capital punishment. The second is based on love and the nature of an ideal spiritual community. This leads to a rejection of capital punishment. JUSTICE AND THE NATURE OF MORAL COMMUNITY A central principle of a just society is that every person has an equal right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness ...
    Related: capital punishment, moral community, opposing, punishment, supporting, thesis
  • Thomas Jefferson: Against His Republican Ideals - 436 words
    Thomas Jefferson: Against His Republican Ideals While Thomas Jefferson was President of the United States, some of his actions conflicted his beliefs and the beliefs of his supporters in the Republican party. For example, he was elected as a highly pacifistic President, but he ended up leading the country toward war. War came about when more money was being given to piratical Algiers than it would have cost to fight a war. This caused Jefferson to rethink his ideas about involving the nation in war. The showdown finally came in 1801. The Pasha of Tripoli declared war on the United States indirectly, and Jefferson was forced to make a decision against his own beliefs - his pacifism, his criti ...
    Related: republican, republican party, republican president, thomas jefferson, president jefferson
  • Upton Sinclair - 835 words
    Upton Sinclair 20 September, 1878-25 November, 1968 "Why should some people be rich and others be poor?" -Upton Sinclair Socialism refers to an ideology and the state of government based on that ideology. Socialists claim to stand for the values of equality, social justice, cooperation, progress, individual freedom, and happiness. They seek to realize these values by the abolition of the private-enterprise economy, also called capitalism, and its replacement by "public ownership," a system of social or state control over production and distribution. The basis of socialism also lies on the abolition of the conflict of the social classes. Throughout history, the poor have always been oppressed ...
    Related: sinclair, upton, upton sinclair, public ownership, pulp fiction
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