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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: ovid

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  • Ovid The Poet - 1,742 words
    Ovid the Poet Not exactly considered a "serious" poet or author, Publius Ovidius Naso, or Ovid as he is more commonly called, captured the spirit of Greek and Roman mythology in his most noted work The Metamorphoses. The stories told in this work are commonly thought of as not serious enough for adults. Therefore, many of these stories have been "dumbed down" and transposed into child book form. Though most of these stories are very serious, many do not see them as sophisticated literature. True as this is, his works are still great and reflect much of the attitude and culture of his time. Behind his fables, Ovid was a fantastic storyteller and a master at capturing the spirit of the ancient ...
    Related: ovid, poet, ancient rome, late middle, ordinary
  • Alighieri, Dante The Divine Comedy - 1,760 words
    Alighieri, Dante The Divine Comedy The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri (1265 - 1321) Type of Work: Allegorical religious poem Setting Hell, Purgatory and Paradise; A.D. 1300 Principal Characters Dante, the Pilgrim Virgil, the Poet, and Dante's guide Beatrice, Dante's womanly ideal and religious inspiration Story Overview Prologue: Dante, realizing he has strayed from the "true way,. into worldliness, tells of a vision where he travels through all the levels of Hell, up the mount of Purgatory, and finally through the realms of Paradise, where he is allowed a brief glimpse of God. The traveler sets out on the night before Good Friday, and finds himself in the middle of a dark wood. There he e ...
    Related: comedy, dante, dante alighieri, divine, divine comedy
  • Botticellis Spring - 995 words
    ... is concept really came into play during the third century of Rome. It is partly based on the Greek mythological logic and religion with many newer Christian aspects added upon it. This is an ever-changing subject with many different sects of views and new ideas forming all the time (3:2). Botticellis Allegory of Spring was painted in 1480 with tempura on canvas. This pre-Christian piece was one of the largest panel paintings with mythological themes. This painting has been in the Uffizi art museum in Florence, Italy since 1919 and was recently restored in 1982. Botticelli painted this in honor of the marriage of Lorenzo Pierfranceso de Media and Seriramide Appiani. Most likely this paint ...
    Related: spring, true meaning, florence italy, italian renaissance, underlying
  • Canterbury Tales By Chaucer - 1,862 words
    ... ink the wine, that he has poisoned, and also die. Fragment VII The Shipman's Tale: a fabliau in which a merchant's wife offers to sleep with a monk if he gives her money; he borrows the money from the merchant, sleeps with the wife, and later tells the merchant (who asks for his money on returning from a journey) that he has repaid it to his wife! She says that she has spent it all, and offers to repay her husband through time together in bed. The tale seems written to be told by a woman, perhaps it was originally given to the Wife of Bath? The Prioress's Prologue and Tale: a religious tale, in complete contrast to the Shipman's. A little boy is killed by wicked Jews because he sings a h ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, chaucer, the canterbury tales, the pardoner
  • Faustus: Renaissance Martyr Or Tragic Hero Faustus Died A Death That Few - 1,566 words
    Faustus: Renaissance Martyr or Tragic Hero Faustus died a death that few could bear to imagine, much less experience. After knowing for many years when exactly he would die, he reached the stroke of the hour of his destiny in a cowardly, horrid demeanor. Finally, when the devils appeared at the stroke of midnight, tearing at his flesh as they draw him into his eternal torment, he screams for mercy without a soul, not even God Himself, to help him. However, what to consider Doctor John Faustus from Christopher Marlow's dramatic masterpiece The Tragical History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus is a very debatable issue. For example, one can see that he threw his life away for the sake o ...
    Related: doctor faustus, dr. faustus, faustus, renaissance, tragic, tragic hero
  • Human And Divine - 1,465 words
    Human And Divine 1) Introduction Through out history, as man progressed from a primitive animal to a "human being" capable of thought and reason, mankind has had to throw questions about the meaning of our own existence to ourselves. Out of those trail of thoughts appeared religion, art, and philosophy, the fundamental process of questioning about existence. Who we are, how we came to be, where we are going, what the most ideal state is....... All these questions had to be asked and if not given a definite answer, then at least given some idea as to how to begin to search for, as humans probed deeper and deeper into the riddle that we were all born into. As time passed, the works of many thi ...
    Related: divine, divine powers, human beings, human life, human race, human society
  • Immortal Gods - 2,631 words
    ... western look through deed and action that Ovid so poetically portrays them. I believe that our gods would of made great bandits, bank robbers and local heroic marshals. No mater how, or who they may have been, I see a convincing comparison between the two. If you were to strip away Jove's power and authority, and replace it with a six-piece shooter, money, and a political office; you would make him a hero, or feared tycoon with power. Take away Media's clothes and power, place her in the cage of her saloon and dress her in the skimpy clothing, that bears a little more than needed, and then give her the title of the head mistress. Take Perseus, give him a six-piece shooter, a badge, and a ...
    Related: immortal, in the cage, common sense, real estate, movies
  • Inferno - 1,234 words
    Inferno On Good Friday 1300 AD, in Dante's thirty-fifth year, he goes astray from the straight road into the Dark Wood of Error. Seeing the Sun (Divine Illumination) lighting the Mount of Joy in the Distance, he attempts to climb up the mountainside but is blocked by three beasts of worldliness: the Leopard of Malice and Fraud, the Lion of Violence and Ambition, and the She-Wolf of Incontinence. When his hope is nearly lost, the shade of the Roman poet Virgil (a symbol of Human Reason) appears to him. Virgil has been sent by Beatrice in Heaven to lead Dante from error; he explains that to defeat the beasts it is necessary to take the harder route through Hell (where sin is recognized), Purga ...
    Related: inferno, ancient world, before christ, the monster, stars
  • Lockouttagout - 1,224 words
    ... two workers and killed one. In addition, in Dec. 1995 an Explosion injured 14 workers (27-9). These incidents happened at the same company. According to NIOSH Alert, out of the 152 fatalities investigated in 20 states during the years 1982-1997, the factors that contributed to these deaths were: Failure to completely de-energize the power source was 82% of the 152 deaths, failure to Lockout/Tagout was 11% of the 152, and failure to check to make sure all power sources were locked out/ tagged out were 7% of the 152 fatalities (Preventing Worker Deaths 99-110). Before the Lockout/Tagout standard went into effect, numerous injuries and fatalities occurred in the workplace that could have be ...
    Related: personal interview, annotated bibliography, medical center, isolating, occurring
  • Organized Crime Has For Nearly One Hundred Years Held An Unseen Control Over The United States Running Both Illegal And Legal - 1,454 words
    ... o get the investigator off Luciano's back for the votes but the deal turned bad (Jacobs, p. 72). As soon as Roosevelt had secured his winning of New York, he immediately turned against the mobsters to win a public appeal. Luciano soon afterwards became public enemy number one. Now he was in the public eye which was against his own wishes. Luciano then redirected his criminal activities to less violent measures. The mob was soon highly involved with gambling, both legal and illegal. Luciano saw an untapped market in the Caribbean and Cuba where he set up casinos. Until he was ran out of Cuba by a new head of power, Fidel Castro, Luciano was without many troubles (Jacobs, p. 74). All the w ...
    Related: crime, illegal, organized crime, unseen, j edgar hoover
  • Pygmalion - 1,022 words
    Pygmalion I chose the archetype "The prostitute with a heart of gold". An archetype is defined as a universal idea that can take many forms, appearing"spontaneously, at any time, at any place, and without any outside influence" (Pygmalions Word Play, Carl Jung, p. 82). When present in the unconscious, an archetype shapes thoughts, feelings, moods, speech, and actions. The prostitute with a heart of gold originated in early Greek mythology as the story of Pygmalion. Next, a more modern version called My Fair Lady was written and performed in the 1950s. Then in the 1980s the movie Pretty Woman came out, which has the same story line as the other two, although it is a lot more modernized and th ...
    Related: pygmalion, fair lady, early greek, pretty woman, flower
  • Raging Inferno By Dante - 1,175 words
    Raging Inferno By Dante Dante Alighieri was born in Florence, Italy in 1265. In his life, he composed two major books of poetry: Vita Nuova and The Divine Comedy. The Vita Nuova is composed of love poems, sonnets, and lyrics. The Divine Comedy, is an epic poem segmented into three books, each of which recounts Dantes travels through hell, purgatory, and heaven. The first section of The Divine Comedy, Dante's Inferno, is a narrative with a man named Virgil as his guide. Dante narrates his descent and observation of hell through the various circles. One part of this tale is his descriptions of the various punishments that each of the different sinners has received. The various punishments that ...
    Related: dante, dante alighieri, dante's inferno, inferno, raging
  • Roman Religion - 1,516 words
    Roman Religion Roman Religion in A Romans Everyday Life vs. Religion's Effects on Today We Romans, said Cicero, owe our supremacy overall other peoples to our piety and religious observances and to our wisdom in believing that the spirit of the gods rules and directs everything. Roman rites and observances took two main forms. One was the domestic reverence of the spirit or genius of the family. The other was the public attitude to the gods and goddesses by whom the destiny and welfare of the Roman people as a whole were supposed to be guided and controlled. During the Classical period, religious observance accompanied all important private and public events and transactions and, no successf ...
    Related: religion, roman, roman empire, roman religion, roman society
  • Rome, History Of The Accounts Of The Regal Period Have Come Down Overlaid With Such A Mass Of Myth And Legend That Few Can Be - 2,893 words
    ... life in 79 BC. In addition to proscription, Sulla employed confiscation of lands as a method of suppressing his political enemies. Confiscated lands were either given to the veterans of his legions, who neglected them, or abandoned to become wasteland; Rome's former rich agricultural economy began to decline, and thenceforth more and more of the city's food was imported, Africa becoming the major source of Rome's grain supply. The Rise of Caesar In 67 BC the statesman and general Pompey the Great, who had fought the Marian party in Africa, Sicily, and Spain, cleared the Mediterranean of pirates and was then put in charge of the war against Mithridates. Meanwhile his rival Gaius Julius C ...
    Related: history, legend, myth, regal, roman world
  • Rousseaus Discourse On The Arts And Sciences - 1,902 words
    Rousseau's Discourse On The Arts And Sciences Rousseau's Discourse on the Arts and Sciences Jean-Jacques Rousseau has been called both the father of the French Revolution and a rascal deserving to hunted down by society (Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson, p. 462). His works, controversial in his lifetime, have lost little of their ability to inspire debate in the seceding two hundred years. Although much of this debate has focused on Rousseau's political theories, his works on morality have not been exempted from the controversy. Much of the controversy surrounding his Discourse on the Arts and Sciences relates to Rousseau's self-proclaimed role of societal critic. In this Discourse, Rouss ...
    Related: arts, discourse, jacques rousseau, jean jacques rousseau, common sense
  • Shakespeare Overall Essay: History And Effects On History - 1,629 words
    Shakespeare Overall Essay: History And Effects On History SHAKESPEARE Let me tell you a story of two young lovers torn apart by the wrath of their parents oh, you've heard this one already? How about the story of the evil villain plotting to overthrow his king? Heard that one too? Surprisingly enough, these stories came into creation over two hundred years ago. The wonder lies not in the stories, but in the man behind them. William Shakespeare is really the defining icon for modern literature. Because of his plays, prose, and poems; the works of Shakespeare are considered to be some of the finest literature ever written. His stories established a foundation off which thousands of dramas, rom ...
    Related: history, john shakespeare, little history, shakespeare, william shakespeare
  • The Comic Scenes Of Dr Faustus - 1,099 words
    The Comic Scenes Of Dr. Faustus When I first began reading Dr. Faustus I did not even realize that there were comic scenes. Only after being told and after watching the movie did I realize that there were comic scenes. Many critics say that Christopher Marlowe did not even write these scenes, but instead say that they were written later by other playwrights. After realizing that there was in fact comedy in the play, I began to ponder why it was in the play. My first thought was that they were there to lighten the mood of such a dark and serious play. Any good playwright knows that you can't hold an audience's attention with hours of serious, deep and emotional content without also having som ...
    Related: comic, dr. faustus, faustus, deadly sins, point of view
  • The Human And The Divine - 856 words
    The Human And The Divine 1) Introduction Through out history, as man progressed from a primitive animal to a human being capable of thought and reason, mankind has had to throw questions about the meaning of our own existence to ourselves. Out of those trail of thoughts appeared religion, art, and philosophy, the fundamental process of questioning about existence. Who we are, how we came to be, where we are going, what the most ideal state is....... All these questions had to be asked and if not given a definite answer, then at least given some idea as to how to begin to search for, as humans probed deeper and deeper into the riddle that we were all born into. As time passed, the works of ma ...
    Related: divine, divine powers, human beings, human life, human race, human society
  • The Life And Works Of Shakespeare - 675 words
    The Life And Works Of Shakespeare William Shakespeare is the world's most admired playwright and poet. He was born in April, 1564 in Stratford-upon-Avon, about 100 miles northwest of London. According to the records of Stratford's Holy Trinity Church, he was baptized on April 26. As with most sixteenth century births, the actual day is not recorded but people are guessing that he was born on April 23. Shakespeare's parents were John and Mary Shakespeare, who lived in Henley Street, Stratford. John, the son of Richard Shakespeare, was a maker, worker and seller of leather goods like purses, belts and gloves and a dealer in agricultural commodities. He served in Stratford government successive ...
    Related: john shakespeare, shakespeare, william shakespeare, work environment, most admired
  • Thomas More: Utopia - 2,972 words
    Thomas More: Utopia The historical Thomas More, the author of Utopia, was an extraordinarily complicated man who tied up all the threads of his life in his heroic death. The Utopia is the sort of complicated book that we should expect from so complicated a man. It is heavy with irony, but then irony was the experience of life in the Sixteenth Century. Everywhere--in church, government, society, and even scholarship--profession and practice stood separated by an abyss. The great difficulty of irony is that we cannot always be sure when the ironic writer or speaker is being serious and when he is being comical. We find that difficulty in Utopia. Edward Hall, the great chronicler of English his ...
    Related: thomas hobbes, thomas more, utopia, human beings, family relationship
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