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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: organisms

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  • Cognitive Science, In The Study Of How Organisms Process Information As Well Carry Out Life Functions The Study Of Cognitive - 369 words
    Cognitive science, in the study of how organisms process information as well carry out life functions. The study of Cognitive science is said to have been originated in the 1940's and 1950's when researchers in various fields of science began to develop theories on the mind based on complex representations and computational procedures (Thagard, Cognitive Science). There are numerous branches of science whose theories contributed to the development of Coginitive Science. These subdivisions include cybernetics, theoretical computer science, linguistics, experimental pyschology, and neuroscience. Cybernetics, a term used by Norbert Wiener is the study of control and communication in animals as ...
    Related: cognitive, cognitive science, organisms, scientific study, social systems
  • Comparison Of Organisms In Different Microhabitats - 581 words
    Comparison Of Organisms In Different Microhabitats A Comparison of Organisms in Different Microhabitats Jessica Hilkey Meeker High School, Meeker, CO 81641 Abstract: On September 12 we started a long-term study of the foothills zone north of the Meeker High School. We evaluated the different organisms in different microhabitats, and studied to see if the habitats were significantly different. Our conclusion was that there was not a significant difference between the different habitats. Introduction September 12, 2000 and several other mornings in September we ventured out to the North Ridge, north of Meeker High School. We asked what organisms lived in the different microhabitats and if the ...
    Related: comparison, different types, organisms, school district, future research
  • Darwins Theory Of Evolution Can Be Explained Like This The Environment Acts As A Selective Agent, Weeding Out Organisms Less - 375 words
    Darwins theory of evolution can be explained like this; the environment acts as a selective agent, weeding out organisms less able to survive. Darwin described natural selection as a process in which organisms become better adapted to their environment. The organisms that evolved with beneficial variations are more likely to survive and reproduce, they pass on the favorable genetic material. Over time, the genetic composition of the species may become better able to escape being eaten or to capture prey. Do to such high demand for antibiotics around the world people have created their own antibiotic resistance and became immune to antibodies. At least half of the human use of antibiotics in ...
    Related: evolution, organisms, selective, theory of evolution, natural selection
  • Genetically Modified Organisms In Our Food - 1,375 words
    Genetically Modified Organisms In Our Food Tomatoes, soy beans and McDonalds French fries- what all of these things have in common? They are all some of the most commonly genetically modified foods on the market today. With scientists in the race to invent newer and better everythings, genetically modified organisms, or GMOs have become a hot topic of research in just the past 10 years. By using the genetic information from one organism, or the DNA and splicing it with the DNA of another, scientists can make food crops grow bigger, stay fresh longer, or even create their own pesticides. In this case however, and often with any case involving genetic modification, the technology has exceeded ...
    Related: genetically, genetically modified, modified, modified organisms, organisms
  • More Than One Celled Organisms Grow By Way Of Mitosis And The Cytoplasmic Division Of Body Cells On The Other Hand, Meiosis O - 1,541 words
    More than one celled organisms grow by way of mitosis and the cytoplasmic division of body cells. On the other hand, meiosis occurs only in germ cells, which are put aside for the formation of gametes (sperm and egg). Reproduction by meiosis allows for species survival and it increases genetic variability. The process, during which the germ cells are generated is called meiosis. It represents nature's solution to the problem of chromosome doubling that would occur, if two diploid cells, i.e. two cells with a double set of chromosomes would fuse. Accordingly does meiosis produce haploid germ cells, with maternal and paternal germ cell fusing at fertilization and thus generating a diploid fusi ...
    Related: cell division, division, meiosis, mitosis, organisms
  • Opposing Genetically Modified Organisms - 485 words
    Opposing Genetically Modified Organisms As a result of biotechnology and its wake of controversy that follows, a number or organizations have voiced their concerns toward the corporate driven discipline. As a product of biotechnologies carelessness, or motives, activist groups have risen throughout the world opposing the novelty of genetically modified organisms. The intent of biotech companies is to market and eventually sell these innovations, eventually increasing their profits and stock prices so new products can be funded while the shareholders line their pockets. Opposing organizations which see biotechnologies incentives as a danger to society and the many other life forms that exist ...
    Related: genetically, genetically modified, modified, modified organisms, opposing, organisms
  • The Role Of Transport Proteins In Eukaryotic Organisms And Their Potential Exploitation In Genetically Modified Plants - 1,228 words
    The role of transport proteins in eukaryotic organisms and their potential exploitation in genetically modified plants There are three major types of membrane transport proteins (Lodish, et. al, 1995). ATP-powered pumps derive the energy required for energetically unfavorable transport of ions or molecules via the hydrolysis of ATP. Channel proteins engage in passive transport, moving particular ions, or water down their respective concentration gradients. Transporters use the slowest mechanism for transport binding only one or a few substrate molecules for transport at a time. All three of these types of molecules contribute to the amazing selectivity of plasma membranes and are, thus, crit ...
    Related: eukaryotic, exploitation, genetically, genetically modified, modified, organisms, plant species
  • Transgenic Organisms - 283 words
    Transgenic Organisms Releasing a Transgenic Organism into Nature In the midst of our society's ever advancing biological technology, scientists have created a plant that is herbicide and pesticide resistant. The question of whether the public should have access to this controversial plant raised many bioethical questions. Farmers encouraged the sale of the plant because it would assist them financially and spare them unnecessary additional labor. They wouldn't have to worry about spraying their crops with herbicides and pesticides because the crops would already be equip to fight away bothersome weeds and pests. Environmentalists are split on the topic. Many strongly believe that the use of ...
    Related: organisms, transgenic, mother nature, evolve, controversial
  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases - 875 words
    A major question facing many teenagers is whether or not to have sex. A result of having sex is contracting sexually transmitted diseases. Sexually transmitted diseases, or venereal diseases affect 10 to 12 million Americans each year. (Daugirdas 75) In the United States, sexually transmitted diseases strike an average of one person every 1.5 seconds. (76) About half of STD patients are under the age of twenty-five. (Landers 45) Nearly 2.5 million teenagers are infected with these deadly diseases. (Welsh A-5) A few types of sexually transmitted diseases are gonorrhea, herpes, chlamydia, syphilis, etc. These diseases can be fatal if not attended to. In addition to those epidemic diseases alre ...
    Related: sexually, sexually transmitted disease, sexually transmitted infections, transmitted, transmitted diseases
  • None - 262 words
    To investigate the abiotic factors which affect the biodiversity of invertebrate organisms in a series of 6 ponds over a period of 2 months. By Contents Page Abstract Contents page Introduction Hypothesis Method Results Conclusions Limitations Reliability Sources of error Modifications Appendix Bibliography Footnotes Acknowledgements Abstract For this investigation I visited 6 ponds and a spring, at each location I recorded the following data: Temperature Turbidity Colour and appearance of water pH of water Nitrate level of water Ammonia levels of water Oxygen levels of water Number and species of life present in the pond I will use shop brought chemical tests for many of the chemical analys ...
    Related: chemical analysis, abstract, species, pond
  • A Introduction - 1,026 words
    A. Introduction During the last twenty years, industrial livestock farms have been replacing the traditional family size farms that once raised most of the nations swine. The number of livestock animals produced in the United States has grown modestly in the past two decades, but the number of farms raising them has slunk dramatically because large producer now dominate the market. The large increase in industry farming has led to large quantities of manure. B. Problem Definition The over abundance of manure has become a problem that leads to problem with Pollution, heated debates between the industries and societies (people of the community), ways to try and find solutions for the pollution ...
    Related: dissolved oxygen, problem definition, real estate, solid, dairy
  • A Parasite Is Defined As An Organism That Lives In Or On Another Organism, Called A Host 2 If The Parasite Has The Capacity T - 1,538 words
    A parasite is defined as an organism that lives in or on another organism, called a host (2). If the parasite has the capacity to cause disease in the host then the parasite is called a pathogen. Disease in the host is caused by the infection of the parasite. The interaction between the host and parasite is complex. Both the pathogen and the host strive for survival in some of the cases. The pathogen divides within or on the host in an attempt to keep its species alive while the hosts defense mechanisms simultaneously attempt to eliminate the pathogen. The extent of the battle for survival varies depending on the relationship. This paper discusses the disease state of Chlamydia; how the orga ...
    Related: capacity, host, organism, parasite, upper saddle
  • Abortion - 974 words
    Abortion Abortion is one of the most controversial issues discussed in todays society. This issue has caused a great deal of turmoil in the world. Some protestors have even killed other human beings over the issue. Peoples religion has had some input on this issue, but this should not be the only factor when looking at this serious controversial debate. There are many questions that one must ask him or herself when deciding to be either for or against abortion. In this position paper I am going to talk about some issues that may not be black and white. My position on this issue is against abortion, and I am going to attempt to show that. Abortion is wrong in many instances. It is wrong anyti ...
    Related: abortion, birth control, human beings, self awareness, sperm
  • Acid Rain - 1,289 words
    Acid Rain Pollution comes in various forms. Whether its toxic waste, CFCs, or sewage, they are all hazardous, to the earth. These can deplete the earth and its inhabitants of resources, causing a harmful change. A product of pollution is acid rain. We shall see that acidification is harmful to all forms of life. Acid rain is any form of precipitation that is polluted by sulphur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxides (NOX). This acid precipitation can be in the form of rain, snow, sleet, fog, or cloud vapors. The acidity of substances dissolved in water are measured by their pH levels. Normal precipitation pH levels fall between 5.0-5.6.2 When levels fall below these numbers, then the precipitati ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, human activity, food supply
  • Acid Rain - 1,829 words
    ... . These particles collect on the leaves of the tree, and studies have shown that when these particles contain acid they can cause damage to the leaves. The leaves are the part of the tree that help make food, hence any damage to the leaves will result in harm to the health of the entire tree. Coniferous trees are vulnerable to the harmful effects of acid rain as well. The tree's needles are designed to nourish the tree after they fall to the ground. Each needle houses whole colonies of microscopic bacteria and algae that help the tree change nitrogen into food at the roots. Acid rain will often burn away this material, thereby reducing adequate food supply, and weakening the tree's healt ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, rain, eastern canada, human health
  • Acid Rain And North America - 1,891 words
    Acid Rain And North America In the past century, one of the greatest threats to North America's aquatic ecosystem has been the widespread acidification of hundreds of thousands of waterways. Acid rain has effected plant and animal life within aquatic ecosystems, as well as microbiologic activity by affecting the rates of decomposition and the accumulation of organic matter. What causes this poisonous rain, and what can be done to improve North America's water quality and prevent future catastrophes? To answer these questions, we must first examine the cause and formation of acid rain, as well as understand ways to decrease or prevent its formation. Formation of acid rain. Acid deposition, mo ...
    Related: acid, acid rain, america, north america, rain
  • Aging Theories - 1,709 words
    Aging Theories This report outlines the main theories of how the process of aging works. Since researchers have not discovered a universally-accepted theory of aging, the theories discussed are potential explanations of how we age. The likelihood of each hypothesis is considered roughly equal. The different theories discussed focus on the workings of different parts of the body, from the molecular level of DNA mutations and replication, to the organism level of becoming "worn out." Aging is a very complex and gradual process, and its ongoing operation is present to some degree in all individuals. It is a journey to the maturity, as well as to the degeneration of the body. Because aging affec ...
    Related: aging, aging process, cell division, free radicals, gradual
  • Aids - 1,103 words
    Aids Aids Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), suppresses the immune system related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A person infected with HIV gradually loses immune function along with certain immune cells called CD4 T-lymphocytes or CD4 T-cells, causing the infected person to become vulnerable to pneumonia, fungus infections, and other common ailments. With the loss of immune function, a clinical syndrome (a group of various illnesses that together characterize a disease) develops over time and eventually results in death due to opportunistic infections (infections by organisms that do not normally cause disease except in people whose immune systems have be ...
    Related: aids, deficiency syndrome, human immunodeficiency, acquired immune, bacterial
  • Aids - 1,140 words
    ... f the mouth by the fungus Candida Albicans, is common in the early symptomatic phase of AIDS. Other infectious fungi include species of the genus Cryptococcus, a major cause of Meningitis in up to 13 percent of people with AIDS. Also, infection by the fungus Histoplasma Capsulatum affects up to 10 percent of people with AIDS, causing general weight loss, fever, and respiratory complications or severe central nervous system complications if the infection reaches the brain. Viral opportunistic infections, especially with members of the Herpes virus family, are common in people with AIDS. One Herpes family member, Cytomegalovirus (CMV), infects the retina of the eye and can result in blindn ...
    Related: aids, blood cells, nervous system, human cells, nose
  • Aids In Detail - 2,050 words
    AIDS In Detail Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Today, despite the continuing production of better antibiotics since the discovery of penicillin, we are facing an infectious disease against which all these drugs are virtually powerless. This disease is spreading inexorably, killing more people and more people each year. AIDS does not know no national boundaries and does not discriminate by race or sex. It is rampaging not only throughout the United States, but also through Africa, India, China, Russia, Europe, South America, and the Caribbean countries. Even infants and children are at risk. AIDS is similar to the bubonic plague or the "BLACK DEATH" that killed perhaps one-third in ...
    Related: aids, aids epidemic, infectious disease, human immunodeficiency, purple
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