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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: organisational

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  • The Organisational Organ Known As The Team Is Becoming More And More Apparent In Todays Dynamic Business World Increasingly M - 1,367 words
    The organisational organ known as the team is becoming more and more apparent in today's dynamic business world. Increasingly managers are searching for a means to improve production and keep their organisation competitive in the global market. A lot of these managers have turned to the team as a means for achieving this improvement. Quality circles were looked at to fulfil this role. However, this form of team is being phased out and may have posed as incubator for the current trend; self - managed work teams (Klein, 1995). These teams are increasingly being looked at today to solve many an organisation's production problems and inefficiencies, and in the process are both badly failing and ...
    Related: business world, dynamic, organ, organisational, project team, successful team, team building
  • The Organisational Organ Known As The Team Is Becoming More And More Apparent In Todays Dynamic Business World Increasingly M - 1,326 words
    ... (1998:12) suggests, ...paying attention to how the team is settling in. Another factor of team building is reminding the team members how important their roles are and the importance of their contribution to the organisation as a whole. As Magee (1997:27) suggests, management should ...help people develop an appreciation of the importance of everyone in accomplishing the ultimate organisational goals. Reminding the team members know of this will raise their exceptance of the team environment and will make their feeling of importance much better, helping team development. In addition to this, an establishment of a team mission could also increase the feeling of importance and direction a ...
    Related: business world, dynamic, organ, organisational, team building, team leader, team member
  • What Is The Nature And Substance Of Organisational Culture To What Extent Can It Be Changed - 1,322 words
    What Is The Nature And Substance Of Organisational Culture? To What Extent Can It Be Changed? Culture, the acquired knowledge that people use to interpret experience and generate social behaviour (Spradley, 1979, p. 5), provides people with a way of seeing the world. It categorizes, encodes, and otherwise defines the world in which they live. Whenever people learn a culture, they are to some extent imprisoned without knowing it. Anthropologists talk of this as being culture bound--i.e., living inside a particular reality. References to culture have long abounded in professional literature. However, it is only fairly recently that the literature shows references to culture as a lens through w ...
    Related: organisational, organizational culture, substance, organization management, brace jovanovich
  • B2b In Smes: Perspectives And Future Challenges, - 1,928 words
    B2b In SmeS: Perspectives And Future Challenges, Chapter 1 Introduction 1.1 Purpose and Content The Forrester report (Feb. 2000) in an article entitled eMarketplaces Boost B2B Trade. Predicts that B2B (business to business) e-Commerce will reach $2.7 trillion in 2004. While Internet trade between individual partners will continue to flourish, eMarketplaces will fuel most of the growth reaching 53% of all online business trade in five years. These figures would suggest that it is imperative that SMEs embrace the e-commerce world that is unfolding around them, to ignore it, could be the business equivalent of hara-kiri. In this dissertation entitled B2B in SMEs: Perspectives and Future Challen ...
    Related: future challenges, transaction costs, electronic data, value added, collaboration
  • Ben And Jerrys Marketing Stratgies - 1,292 words
    ... push the industry profits down in the process. Ben & Jerrys competitive structure seems to be consolidated. The more commodities like an industrys product the more vicious will be the price war. The nature and intensity of rivalry in their industry is much more difficult to predict. As the companies are interdependent competitive actions of one company will directly effect the profitability of others. Companies sometimes seek to reduce this (price war) by following the price lead set by the dominant company in the industry. The demand conditions also affect the intensity of internal rivalry between companies. Growing demand tends to reduce rivalry as companies can sell more without takin ...
    Related: marketing, marketing plan, global environment, ice cream, comfort
  • Bookreport - 1,222 words
    BOOKREPORT by Maximilian Schreder Malcolm X The Autobiography as told to Alex Haley Introduction When Malcolm X was murdered in the Audubon Ballroom in Harlem on February 21, 1965, he was world-famous as the angriest black man in America. By that time he had completed his autobiography, so we have now the opportunity to get information of this both hated and loved Afro-American leaders life at first hand. The book The Autobiography of Malcolm X, which he wrote with the assistance of Alex Haley, was first published in 1965. The Two Authors Malcolm X did not write his autobiography on his own, but he told his life to the journalist and novelist Alex Haley. Haley had already interviewed Malcolm ...
    Related: afro american, politics and religion, american struggle, desperate, joining
  • Changing Job Roles - 3,044 words
    Changing Job Roles Introduction This paper is the result of research into and reflection on the roles carried out by those who are responsible for managing the 'people' function within organisations. Whether these incumbents are called personnel or HR managers is not necessarily important; it is however critical to give recognition to the complexity of the task that faces those who have to take responsibility for this function. This paper raises two inter-related issues. First, in what sorts of activities do personnel managers decide to invest time and energy? Are the old reliables of recruitment, training and employee relations the key tasks of the 1990s or are other issues more important? ...
    Related: management role, global information, private sector, career development, evaluation
  • Changing Job Roles - 3,019 words
    ... ust be able to motivate people to accomplish aggressive objectives within defined time constraints. Extensive travel within the European region as well as to the US is expected. European language skills, in particular German, will be a distinct advantage. Remuneration and Benefits Manager Coupled with being a good communicator, you will have excellent analytical skills, in addition to a demonstrable strategic perspective in relation to the development and implementation of policies. The models identified by Tyson and Fell have also be found in Irish organisations (Shivanath, 1986; Monks, 1992/3). Monks, from a study of 97 Irish organisations, identified four types of personnel practice: ...
    Related: business environment, current practices, poor management, developer, retaining
  • Chinese Democracy Movements - 2,363 words
    Chinese Democracy Movements In 1978, stimulated by the opening of China to the West and also by the "reversal of verdicts" against the 1976 Tiananmen protesters (These demonstrations against the gang of four had been condemned as counter-revolutionary at the time but were now declared a revolutionary act), thousands of Chinese began to put their thoughts into words, their words onto paper and their paper onto walls to be read by passers by. The most famous focus of these displays became a stretch of blank wall just to the west of the former forbidden city in Beijing, part of which was now a museum and park and part the cluster of residences for China's most senior National leaders. Because o ...
    Related: chinese, chinese people, chinese revolution, democracy, science and technology
  • Collective Bargaining In The Workplace - 2,241 words
    ... d by the parties to be a legally enforceable contract unless the agreement - (a) is in writing, and (b) contains a provision which (however expressed) states that the parties intend that the agreement shall be a legally enforceable contract (2) Any collective agreement which does satisfy these conditions in subsection (1)(a) and (b) above shall be conclusively presumed to have been intended by the parties to be a legally enforceable contract.' There are four main advantages claimed for the legal enforcement of collective agreements: (a) collective agreements would have to become both more comprehensive and more precise in defining the rights and obligations of each party if their meaning ...
    Related: bargaining, collective, collective bargaining, workplace, different levels
  • Computer Virus Technology - 1,778 words
    Computer Virus Technology 2.0 Introduction The wind of change came on 26th March in the form of an email cyclone called Melissa. Moreover, during 1999 numerous changes in the level of computer virus technology were seen, Armstrong (May 2000, p1). From an organisational point of view, societies around the world are just learning about the level of importance that computer security against virus attacks and the critical significance of cybercrime. Companies around the world lost vast amounts of time, money and resources due to the lack of defense systems and lack of knowledge. Companies must ensure that the all data processing equipment like computers, routers and networks are robust and secur ...
    Related: computer security, computer virus, technology, virus, operating system
  • Contents 1 Introduction 2 What Is Business Ethics 3 The 10 Benefits Of Business Ethics 4 Case Study On Nestle 41 The Impact O - 1,791 words
    Contents 1. Introduction 2. What is Business Ethics? 3. The 10 Benefits of Business Ethics 4. Case Study on Nestle 4.1. The Impact of Business Ethics on Nestle 4.2. Nestle's view on Business Ethics 4.3. The Implications of Business Ethics on Stakeholders 5. Conclusion Introduction Businesses have power through their ability to spend vast amounts of money. They have the ability to enhance or change situations that the common individual does not. As organisations affect many people, they have obligations to their employees, consumers, community and the world. They have a responsibility to conduct business in a way that is not harmful and which positively benefits as many people as possible and ...
    Related: business environment, business ethics, case study, ethics, nestle
  • Ecommerce An Introduction - 2,186 words
    E-commerce an Introduction In the broadest sense, electronic commerce (e-commerce), is the buying and selling of products and services over the Internet. It has included the handling of purchase transactions and funds transfers over computer networks. According to the Forrester Research Study Sizing Intercompany Commerce, total U.S business-to-business Internet trade in 1998 is $7.7 billion, compared to a total global e-commerce of $21.8 billion, dramatically increasing from $2.5 billion in 1997. By the year 2002, according to the report, there will be $328 billion worth of e-commerce. Electronic Commerce (e-commerce) Electronic commerce is the ability to perform transactions involving the e ...
    Related: ecommerce, business transactions, customer satisfaction, world wide web, portion
  • Employee Empowermet - 758 words
    Employee Empowermet Debate #2: Employee Empowerment is the Only Way The selected passage discusses the idea of teaching people to lead themselves in the work place, or empowering employees to make decisions that will affect the running of the organisation, and ultimately, their careers. The passage asserts that organisations function best when the top management holds paramount decision-making power because it focuses this power to the only body truly capable of making educated, goal-achieving decisions. This view stands open to much criticism. The article states that a specific organisational body must be given ultimate decision-making power so that important decisions cannot be passed off ...
    Related: employee, point of view, information source, effective teamwork, management
  • Employee Selection - 1,219 words
    ... ection method. Therefore, the information provided by the application form is insufficient. The information provided by the application form needs to be further proved. There are at least two probabilities that will influence the reliability. One is whether all the information of the forms is true. Evidently, not all applicants are honest. It is possible that the information was magnified, omitted or even not existed. The other is whether the selector misunderstands the information of the form. Because the selection only based on the data without confirmed, then the selectors use some models or logic make some conclusions. It is probably to misunderstand. Application form cannot get feed ...
    Related: employee, employee training, selection, brief history, individual development
  • Ethics And Organizational Development - 1,884 words
    Ethics And Organizational Development For many organisations 'ethics' is something to be defined and managed by senior executives. Consider the arguments for and against this control-oriented position. In today's world it is all too prevalent to see more and more people hungry to gain success at an ever-increasing rate. Modern culture can and indeed is labelled 'greedy' and 'thoughtless'. Through my relatively short time spent in business, I have encountered many of these types of people. But who are they hungry for? Who benefits from their thoughtlessness, and why do they do what they do? More importantly, who is to blame when things don't go according to plan? These are all questions asked ...
    Related: code of ethics, ethics, organizational, business world, best approach
  • Fordism And Scientific Management - 1,966 words
    Fordism And Scientific Management FORDISM, SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT AND THE LESSONS FOR CONTEMPORARY ORGANISATIONS Fordism and Scientific Management are terms used to describe management that had application to practical situations with extremely dramatic effects. Fordism takes its name from the mass production units of Henry Ford, and is identified by an involved technical division of labour within companies and their production units. Other characteristics of Fordism include strong hierarchical control, with workers in a production line often restricted to the one single task, usually specialised and unskilled. Scientific management, on the other hand, "originated" through Fredrick Winslow Ta ...
    Related: management, management techniques, scientific management, scientific study, human cost
  • Greek Independence - 341 words
    Greek Independence Greek Independence The Greek war of Independence was the result of several factors. One of the most important events was the Orlov Rebellion of 1778-79. Inspired by the belief that Russias war with the Turks that countries were ready to liberate all the Christians in the Ottoman Empire, a short-lived uprising took place in the Peloponnesus, in the beginning of 1778. This venture however failed because of poor organisation, but it set a model for violent resistance to Ottoman rule. The Orlov Rebellion also urged brutal measures by the Sublime Porte (the Ottoman government) which increased anger against the empire. The intellectual basis of nationalism came form the rich and ...
    Related: greek, greek state, ottoman empire, napoleon bonaparte, leadership
  • Hrm : A Comparison Of Hrm Strategies In Two Local Companies - 1,005 words
    Hrm : A Comparison Of Hrm Strategies In Two Local Companies 1 Introduction It is widely acknowledged and accepted in business that the sources of sustained competitive advantage lie not only in access to finance or capital, but within the organisation, in people and processes capable of delivering business strategies such as customer satisfaction or rapid innovation. (Lundy, 1994). A strategic approach to human resource management (HRM) ensures that a firms human capital contributes to the achievement of its business objectives. Various influential writers have expressed differing opinions on the importance of employees as a direct influence on an organisations competitive advantage. Althoug ...
    Related: business strategies, comparison, financial performance, resource management, influential
  • Human Resource Management : How Groups Behave Differently From Individuals - 1,873 words
    Human Resource Management : How Groups Behave Differently From Individuals ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR AND ANALYSIS COURSE ASSIGNMENT QUESTION 2 IN WHAT WAYS DO GROUPS BEHAVE DIFFERENTLY FROM INDIVIDUALS? This essay will attempt to answer the above question by not only studying the conduct of individuals and groups in a work context, but also by looking at the causes of behaviour. Organisational behaviour theories, experiments and case studies will be used to investigate the behaviour of first the individual and then the group in a work environment. The term group for the purposes of this assignment as been defined as a formal group which has been established by an organisation at a point in ti ...
    Related: behave, differently, group member, human behaviour, human resource management, individual differences, management
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