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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: ordinary people

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  • Ordinary People By Judith Guest - 319 words
    Ordinary People By Judith Guest Ordinary People by Judith Guest is the story of a family having psychological problems, which relate to one another through superficial behaviors. They distort reality and hide their true emotions to reduce or prevent anxiety. The book opens with seventeen year old Conrad, son of upper middle-class Beth and Calvin Jarrett, comes home after eight months in a psychiatric hospital, because he had attempted suicide by slashing his wrists. His mother is a meticulously orderly person who despises him. She does all the right things; attending to Jared's physical needs, keeping a spotless home, plays golf and bridge with other women in her social circle but in her own ...
    Related: guest, judith, ordinary, ordinary people, attempted suicide
  • Ordinary People Ordinary People By Judith Guest Is The Story Of A Dysfunctional Family - 1,301 words
    Ordinary People Ordinary People by Judith Guest is the story of a dysfunctional family who relate to one another through a series of extensive defense mechanisms, i.e. an unconscious process whereby reality is distorted to reduce or prevent anxiety. The book opens with seventeen year old Conrad, son of upper middle-class Beth and Calvin Jarrett, home after eight months in a psychiatric hospital, there because he had attempted suicide by slashing his wrists. His mother is a meticulously orderly person who, Jared, through projection, feels despises him. She does all the right things; attending to Jared's physical needs, keeping a spotless home, plays golf and bridge with other women in her soc ...
    Related: dysfunctional, dysfunctional family, guest, judith, ordinary, ordinary people
  • A Sufis Connection To The World - 647 words
    A Sufi's Connection To The World A Sufis Connection to the World 11/18/99 The attributes of the followers of the Sufi tradition are attributes that serve to loosen their connection to the world while bringing them closer to God. The attributes they have distinguish them from ordinary people. According to Teachings of the Sufis, by Carl Ernst, they are strict followers of a master, strive to be humble, and try to live without worldly possessions and desires. At the core of the practice of Sufism is reliance on the truth of God. It is very important that this reliance is maintained, otherwise the follower will become distracted by worldly things and ideas. The Sufi master Abu Ali al-Daqqaq sai ...
    Related: ordinary people, satan, reliance, tree
  • A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning - 1,054 words
    A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Although the subject matter of A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning could be applied to any couple pending separation, John Donne wrote his poem for his wife on the eve of his departure for France in 1611.In the poem, the speaker pleads with his lady to accept his departure. The speaker defines and celebrates a love that transcends the physical and can therefore endure and even grow through separation. In arguing against mourning and emotional upheaval, Donne uses a series of bold and unexpected comparisons for the love between the speaker and his lady. Donne makes his first surprising analogy in the first stanza when he com ...
    Related: mourning, john donne, subject matter, ordinary people, refer
  • A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning - 1,305 words
    A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Intro to Poetry Oct 10 2000 Interpretation of A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Although that it may seem that the meaning of A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning could be applied to any couple awaiting separation, according to Izaak Walton, a seventeenth-century biographer, John Donne wrote his poem for his wife, Anne Donne, right before his departure for France in 1611 (Damrosch 238). However, even though the poem is not written to an audience, many of us can learn from what Donne is trying to convey to his wife. In the poem, Donne pleads with his lady to accept his departure. He defines and celebrates a love that transcends the physical realm and expresse ...
    Related: mourning, middle ages, true meaning, john donne, greek
  • Abuses Of The Medieval Catholic Clergy - 1,431 words
    Abuses of the Medieval Catholic Clergy The Dark Ages of Europe were called such for several reasons. One of the more notorious reasons was the state of the Catholic Church. In the years before the Reformation, members of the Catholic clergy had reached an all time low in terms of their morality. The abuses of clerical power and privileges by the medieval clergy spanned all parts of their daily lives. Members of the Catholic clergy were financially, politically and socially corrupt. Each of these corruptions made up the enormous religious corruption that was the logical result of such debauchery. Of the several grievances against the Church, [t]he first and sorest was that she loved money, an ...
    Related: catholic, catholic church, clergy, medieval, ordinary people
  • Afterlife - 1,117 words
    Afterlife There was a woman who had been diagnosed with cancer and had been given three months to live. Her Dr. told her to start making preparations to die (something we all should be doing all of the time.) So she contacted her pastor and had him come to her house to discuss certain aspects of her final wishes. She told him which songs she wanted sung at the service, what scriptures she would like read, and what she wanted to be wearing. The woman also told her pastor that she wanted to be buried with her favorite bible. Everything was in order and the pastor was preparing to leave when the woman suddenly remembered something very important to her. "There's one more thing," she said excite ...
    Related: afterlife, c. s. lewis, life after death, bible says, buried
  • Airline Safety - 1,052 words
    Airline Safety What Should the Regulations be Regarding Airline Safety? Introduction It was early in the morning, warm & sunny. We had the day off from school for some reason, but I can't remember why. I was riding my bike in the street with my friend, Mike, about 4 blocks from my home in the North Park area of San Diego when I heard a faint blast, looked up and saw a jetliner falling out of the sky on fire. I can't remember thinking anything except It's going to hit my house. Then I realized there were probably a lot of people on the plane, and was immediately so scared I began to cry. Then I didn't hear anything until the plane hit the ground. Watching that plane on impact is a sensation I ...
    Related: airline, safety regulations, charles de gaulle, paris france, likes
  • An Oral History Of A Young Jewish Women In World War Ii - 1,273 words
    An Oral History Of A Young Jewish Women In World War Ii It was 1940, I was 23, and there was a war going on. Everyone knew that Adolf Hitler, Germany's Fuhrer, was campaigning against several countries in Europe. He had started another war by invading Poland months earlier, and now it seemed that he was taking other countries as well1. It was being talked about, but not much was known specifically about what exactly was happening in Europe. The United States was not getting involved in another great war. There were so many lives lost from the first war, and the country was still feeling effects of the depression that we could not afford to get into another war so suddenly. After all, for Ger ...
    Related: history, jewish, jewish women, oral, oral history, world war ii
  • An Ordinary Outlook - 1,013 words
    An Ordinary Outlook The movie Ordinary People directed by Robert Redford is a very real life movie set in the suburbs of Illinois in the late 1970s. The movie begins early December and ends what seems to me like the following spring. I think the significance of the seasons is that December, representing a dreary lifeless mood, at least for the northwest region, symbolizes death. During this time, Conrad experiences many confrontations with this matter. He has recently witnessed the death of his brother and is struggling to make his appearance seem normal. When the weather begins to get warmer, setting a more renewed atmosphere, Conrad begins to understand his emotions and, therefore, deals w ...
    Related: ordinary, ordinary people, outlook, real life, hard times
  • Analysis Of The Underlying Social Psychology - 1,123 words
    Analysis of the underlying social psychology of the Holocaust March 9, 2000 The hate and prejudice that began the Holocaust went hand in hand with a political agenda that was fueled by the frustration aggression theory.(1) Hitler blamed the Jews for the loss of World War I and thus, instead of targeting political aspects of the Jewish community, he displaced his aggression towards ALL Jews, even the helpless. This, combined with religious anti-Semitism prejudice that had been present in Germany for 1500 years and the theory of eugenics, was the political and instrumental center of Hitler's political campaign.(5) He used a system of 'elimination of freedom', which he felt was necessary in the ...
    Related: psychology, social psychology, underlying, cognitive dissonance, jewish community
  • Analysis Of The Underlying Social Psychology - 1,161 words
    ... ople rescued others for various reasons. Some were motivated by a sense of morality. Others had a relationship with a particular person or group and thus, felt a sense of obligation. Some were politically driven and were adamantly opposed to Hitler. Other rescuers were involved at work as diplomats, nurses, social workers, and doctors, and thus were conditioned to continue their involvement beyond their professional obligation. This is where cognitive dissonance comes into effect in this instance. These people were raised to help, it was a part of their moral fabric. To go against that learned belief would cause dissonance, therefore, these people had it woven into them to rescue, to hel ...
    Related: psychology, social animal, social psychology, social workers, underlying
  • Anarchy - 1,764 words
    Anarchy Throughout the ages, man has toiled with various forms of government. From early day aristocracies to modern day democracies, man has developed theories of the ideal government. Of these governments, Anarchy has proven itself to be an unrealistic form of government. Anarchists pose different views of absolute liberty and the degree of government intervention as to the governmental figure of the times. Anarchy comes from the Greek word, anarchos, prefix an meaning 'not,' 'the want of,' 'the absence of,' or 'the lack of,' plus archos, meaning 'a ruler,' 'director,' 'chief,' 'person in charge,' or 'authority,' derived as 'having no government' or 'without rule' (Ask.com). Justice define ...
    Related: anarchy, working class, ancient china, self reliance, nonviolent
  • Anarchy - 1,645 words
    Anarchy Anarchism seems to be defined many ways by many different sources. Most dictionary definitions define anarchism as the absence of government. A leading modern dictionary, Webster's Third International Dictionary, defines anarchism briefly but accurately as, "a political theory opposed to all forms of government and governmental restraint and advocating voluntary cooperation and free association of individuals and groups in order to satisfy their needs." Other dictionaries describe anarchism with similar definitions. The Britannica-Webster dictionary defines the word anarchism as, "a political theory that holds all government authority to be unnecessary and undesirable and advocates a ...
    Related: anarchy, william godwin, working class, utopian society, empower
  • Antigone Tragism - 1,425 words
    Antigone Tragism Antigone, which was written by Sophocles, is possibly the first written play that still exists today (www.imagi... 1). There is much controversy between who the tragic hero is in the play. Some people say Antigone, some say Creon, others even say Heamon. I believe Creon displays all of the characteristics of a tragic hero. He receives compassion through the audience, yet recognizes his weaknesses, and his downfalls from his own self-pride, stubbornness, and controlling demands. He is the true protagonist. Though the audience notices how villainous Creon is, they still express sympathy towards him. They realize that he has brought all of his problems on himself and should hav ...
    Related: antigone, tragic hero, good leader, king creon, stanley
  • Archetyple Heros - 416 words
    Archetyple Heros In literature, the term archetype refers to a pattern or model of an action, a character type, or an image that recurs enough in life and literature to be considered universal. Medival heroes and modern ones share many characteristics; however, their approaches to dangers are quite different. First, the medival hero is thought to be brave. He goes out questing in search to set bad to good, rescue damsels in distress, and instore the chivalric code Might for Right. Next, the hero is often aided by the supernatural. He has the use of magical powers, wizardly weapons, and unearthly people. Sometimes in these stories, the supernatural being such as wizards, psychics, aurgers, an ...
    Related: famous women, james bond, religious practices, ordinary, rescue
  • Asian Variant Of Theatre - 393 words
    Asian Variant Of Theatre Asian theatre is comprised of more than one geographic area. It consists of India, China and Japan. Each brought their own uniqueness to Asian theatre. Asian theatre as it pertains to China will be discussed in this chapter. Ancient Chinese chronicles mention other theatrical activities such as skits, pantomimes, juggling, singing and dancing. This serves as an indication that there were early Chinese versions of popular entertainment. During the Yuan Dynasty, China was ruled not by a Chinese emperor but rather by a Mongol. There was an outbreak of drama in the Yuan Dynasty. Yuan drama was usually written in four acts. Usually the leading character sang all of the mu ...
    Related: asian, theatre, variant, ming dynasty, ancient chinese
  • Barrons Book Notes - 5,432 words
    ... ers in the front lines. His tactlessness makes Paul's first leave more miserable than it might otherwise have been. ^^^^^^^^^^ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT: FRAU (MRS.) BAUMER Paul's mother is a courageous woman who is dying of cancer. She is the most comforting person Paul finds at home. She alone does not pretend to understand what it is like at the front. Paul is in agony over her illness and is overwhelmed by the love she shows him by preparing his favorite foods and depriving herself in order to buy him fine underwear. ^^^^^^^^^^ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT: FRAU (MRS.) KEMMERICH Unlike Paul's quiet mother, Franz Kemmerich's mother tends to weep and wail. She had unreasonably exp ...
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  • Bonaparte Betrayed The Revolution - 1,936 words
    Bonaparte Betrayed The Revolution 'Bonaparte betrayed the revolution.' Do you agree with this statement? Justify your answer. Napoleon Bonaparte's attitude towards the French Revolution is one that has often raised questions. That the revolution had an influence on Bonaparte's regime cannot be denied - but to what extent? When one looks at France after Napoleon's reign it is clear that he had brought much longed for order and stability. He had also established institutions that embodied the main principles of the revolution. However, it is also evident that many of his policies directly contradict those same principles. Was Napoleon betraying the same revolution that gave him power, or was h ...
    Related: betrayed, bonaparte, french revolution, napoleon bonaparte, freedom of religion
  • Boston Tea Party Leads To Independence - 1,009 words
    Boston Tea Party Leads To Independence Boston Tea Party Leads to Independence The Boston Tea Party was an important and influential part of America becoming independent from Great Britain. America was formed on the basis of being a free country, however Great Britain held it back from being autonomous. Britain controlled everything about America. Though America was free of some things like religion and politics it was still taxed on many things. Following the Seven Years War, England went through a serious financial crisis as a result of which it was obliged to impose taxes on many products. Among them in particular were goods destined for the colonies, including wine, sugar, molasses, and t ...
    Related: boston, boston harbor, boston tea party, declaration of independence, financial crisis
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