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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: olympic

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  • Cultural Imperialism And The Olympic Games - 1,540 words
    Cultural Imperialism And The Olympic Games Cultural Imperialism and the Olympic Games Virtually since their resumption in 1896, every four years the press is filled with complaints about the intrusion of power politics into the Olympic games. David B. Kanin has commented that while we are told that international Olympic system idealizes and promotes fair play and sportsmanship and ameliorates struggle, hatred, and petty jealously through structured competition and international goodwill, the realist is that international sport thrives on the very politics Olympic publicists decry (Kanin 1). Nevertheless, the games are more or less 'political', than anything else. Ninety-five percent of the p ...
    Related: cultural imperialism, cultural values, imperialism, international olympic, olympic, olympic games
  • Multicultural Participation In Olympic Movement - 455 words
    Multicultural Participation In Olympic Movement Multicultural Participation The goal of the Olympic Movement is to contribute to building a peaceful and better world by educating youth through sport practised without discrimination of any kind and in the Olympic spirit which requires mutual understanding, friendship, solidarity and fair play. Multiculturalism is a policy based on rights and responsibilities, which has been endorsed by Australian governments for managing a unified nation, which is culturally diverse. It is a policy that relies on mutual respect, whereby members of Australia's diverse communities respect each others' differences. Sydney's Bid for the 2000 Olympic Games promote ...
    Related: multicultural, olympic, olympic games, participation, english speaking
  • Olympic - 2,403 words
    Olympic Games The Olympic Games, an international sports competition, are held once every four years at a different site, where athletes from different nations compete against each other in a wide variety of sports. There are two classifications of Olympics, the Summer Olympics and the Winter Olympics. Through 1992 they were held in the same year, but beginning in 1994 they were rescheduled so that they are held in alternate even-numbered years. For example, the Winter Olympics were held in 1994 and the Summer Olympics in 1996. The Winter Olympics were next held in 1998 in Nagano, Japan, while the Summer Olympics will next occur in 2000 in Sydney, Australia. The Olympic Games are administere ...
    Related: international olympic, international olympic committee, olympic, olympic committee, olympic games
  • Olympic - 2,384 words
    ... a single race of 200 yards, approximately the length of the stadium"(Gorman 84) The race was called the "Stade" from which our word "stadium" was derived. The first recorded victor in 776 B.C. was "Coroebus of Elis, a cook"(Gorman 84). The athletes of Elis maintained an unbroken string of victories until the 14th Olympiad at which time a second race of two lengths of the stadium was added. In the 15th Olympiad, an endurance event was added in which the athletes "went 12 times around the stadium, about 4 1/2 kilometers"(Gorman 85). The athletes competed in groups of four, which were determined by "drawing lots with the winners meeting the other winners until a final race was run"(Gorman 8 ...
    Related: olympic, olympic committee, olympic games, olympic village, satellite communications
  • Olympic Games - 650 words
    Olympic Games The first Olympic games took place in the ancient civilization Greece. Like today, they were brutal competitions of skill and athleticism. In Greece the Olympics were thought as the ultimate in. They were not looked at as being merely a sport, but life. Today however, we do not see them as such. The Olympics are still very important To be in the Olympics and succeed is still the life goal of many athletes. Today people compete in the Olympics for the honor of their country, on a team; whereas a long time ago people fought only for the purpose of bringing glory and success to themselves. The original Olympics included a mere six event categories: boxing, equestrian events, pankr ...
    Related: olympic, olympic games, long distance, more violent, aforementioned
  • Olympic Games Still Capture Gold - 892 words
    Olympic Games Still Capture Gold The Olympic Games still Capture the Gold It is a shame the Olympic Games last only one month every two years. The Olympic Spirit represents all that is good in the world. The games have set the standard, in addition to athletic excellence, for global harmony. It is inspiring to see the fans who attend and the spirit of the athletes that continue to compete, in the face of a fundamentally insecure environment, and an insecure world. The Olympic Games are a celebration of world-wide pride, fair international competition and, human excellence made possible through cultural unity. The Olympic Spirit is resiliant and really does live within ordinary people. The Ol ...
    Related: capture, olympic, olympic games, ordinary people, global business
  • The Olympic Games - 1,287 words
    The Olympic Games The Olympic Games are a tradition of athletic events that take place every four years. They are a custom that was started many years ago, but are currently taken for granted. People from all over the world tune their televisions and radios to watch and listen to the events, but never question their existence. When were the Olympic games started? What was the first event? How did it grow? Where were the first games held? Why did they start? Did they have any political, social, or religious meanings? The games started about 3,500 years ago in the country of Greece. The first games were not called the Olympic games but the Classical games. They were held every four years as th ...
    Related: olympic, olympic games, works cited, city state, athens
  • A Day In The Life Of An Ancient Athenian - 1,174 words
    A Day in The Life of an Ancient Athenian jenn neff A day in the life of an ancient Athenian Welcome to Athens, the marvel of Greece! The city which is the fountainhead of beauty, wisdom and knowledge. Even as your ship approaches the Athenian harbor Piraeus, you can see the marble monuments of the Acropolis and the shining golden edge of the spear, which belongs to the gigantic statue of the goddess Pallas Athene. This is one of the greatest works of the sculptor Phidias, and symbolizes both the power and justice of the "violet city" as it was called by his contemporaries. Athenian women had virtually no political rights of any kind and were controlled by men at nearly every stage of their l ...
    Related: ancient athens, ancient greeks, athenian, athenian women, family life
  • Above The Law - 1,177 words
    Above The Law Above the law The flashing lights of the police cars are blinding to you in your inebriated state. Through your drunken haze, the events leading up to now start to unfold. You were pulling ninety miles an hour in your SUV, when you collided with the bus full of blind orphans. The resulting crash sent the bus careening off the overpass, and onto a passing group of nuns and the governor, killing all of them instantly. The total body count is so far unknown. If you were an average person, you could expect the electric chair without question. Of course, you're far from average. You're a former Olympic champion who stars in the number one rated show in America, and whose movie has w ...
    Related: last year, walk away, preferential treatment, rehab, stiff
  • Aids As An Invader - 1,827 words
    Aids As An Invader Acquired immune deficiency syndrome, also known as AIDS, is a silent invader. The first cases of this disease were reported in the early 1980s. AIDS is caused by the infection known as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which is a microscopic organism that can grow and multiply inside living cells. HIV attacks and disables the bodys immune system. The immune system is the system that usually fights off illnesses. When the immune system breaks down, a person with AIDS will develop life-threatening illnesses. (Flynn & Lound, 6) The invasion of the AIDS virus in an individuals body leaves the body open to an invasion by many other different infections, called opportunistic d ...
    Related: aids, western europe, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, saharan africa, infected
  • Alcohol Abuse Among College Students And Possible Solutions - 1,076 words
    ... accidents is probably the biggest cause of deaths among the 300,000 college students that will eventually die because "drinking and driving has been reported by 60% of college men and 50% of college women who are binge drinkers" (The College Experience, 2001). Also "75% of male students and 55% of female students involved in acquaintance rape had been drinking at the time" (Drinking: A Students Guide, 2001). "Between 75% and 90% of all violence on campuses is alcohol related" (Marcus, 2000, p. 53). "Alcohol is a factor in 66% of student suicides and 60% of all sexually-transmitted diseases" (Marcus, 2000, p. 53). Besides just misfortunes and deaths among college students who abuse alcoho ...
    Related: abuse, alcohol, alcohol abuse, alcohol consumption, college students, college women, female students
  • Alcoholism Is A Wideranging And Complex Disease That Heavily Plagues Society Drinking Is Defined As The Consumption Of A Liqu - 1,066 words
    Alcoholism is a wide-ranging and complex disease that heavily plagues society. Drinking is defined as the consumption of a liquid, and/or the act of drinking alcoholic beverages especially to excess. Every year alcohol is responsible for 1/2 of all murders, accidental deaths, and suicides; 1/3 of all drowning, boating, and aviation deaths; 1/2 of all crimes; and almost 1/2 of all fatal automobile accidents (Overview 1). Alcohol is a potent nonprescription drug sold to anyone over the national legal drinking age, 21. Unlike carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, which can be manufactured by the body, alcohol is a substance that is not made within the body. It is a food, because it supplies a conc ...
    Related: alcoholism, binge drinking, consumption, drinking, drinking age, drinking coffee, heavily
  • Anabolic Steroids - 1,862 words
    Anabolic Steroids Anabolic Steroid Use in the Olympics Canadian track star Ben Johnson was denied his gold medal in the 1988 Olympics after he tested positive for anabolic steroids. This incident sparked worldwide attention to the extent of anabolic steroid use. To date, the International Olympic Committee has barred the use of seventeen anabolic steroids. Other organizations, including The National Football League, National Collegiate Athletic Associations International Amateur Athletic Federation, and the International Federation of Body Builders have followed suit. Athletes and non-athletes alike are still abusing anabolic steroids to excel in sports. Anabolic steroids belong to a group o ...
    Related: anabolic, anabolic steroids, steroid use, steroids, works cited
  • Ancient Greek Civilisation - 701 words
    Ancient Greek Civilisation The earliest Greek civilization thrived around 4,000 years ago. Some of the things that they had that we still use today are the arts, science, math, literature, and politics. The Greeks were known for their great intelligence, military strategies, and their buildings. All Greek's spoke the same language. This made it easier to trade and to communicate between different parts of the country. All Greeks believed in the same gods and also shared some common heritage. The Greeks believed that there was a god for everything on earth. A few examples of these gods are Zeus, ruler of the gods. Posidon was the god of the ocean and Hades, god of the under world. The Greek g ...
    Related: civilisation, greek, greek civilization, wives and daughters, different ways
  • Ancient Olympics - 1,441 words
    Ancient Olympics Games of the Ancient Olympics The Olympics began in ancient Olympia Greece, which lies 10km east of Pirgos, in a valley between Mt. Kronos, the Alfios river, and the Kladeos. This area was inhabited by the Pisans, whose King was Oinomaus. His daughter Hippodameia had married Pelops, and it has been said that the first games were held in their honor around 1000 B.C. Through the years the games began to attract interest in nearby towns. In 776 B.C. , the leader of the Eleians, Iphitos, rededicated the games to the honor of Zeus, (the most important god in the ancient Greek pantheon). As a result of the religious nature of the games, all wars would cease during the contests. Th ...
    Related: ancient mythology, olympics, left hand, greek mythology, archeological
  • Ancient Olympics - 1,392 words
    ... e athlete could grip it. Varying in weight, their main purpose was to increase the length of the jump. On one side of the fifty foot jumping pit, there was a fixed point called the bater. This was a point from where all jumps were measured. By swinging the halteres and getting a running start, the athlete would then jump and hold onto the weights until the end of his flight, then throw them backwards. He then came down onto the soil with his feet together, with his jumped being measured with a wooden rod called a kanon. A good jumper needed quick acceleration within the limited runway. Coordination and power was essential in using the bater for proper spring in their jump. It all had to ...
    Related: ancient greece, olympics, true meaning, vice versa, agility
  • Androstenodione - 718 words
    Androstenodione This past year a lot of things have happened in the world. President Clinton could possibly be impeached. Our government tried to once again take over Sadaam Hussein. And Mark McGwire hit 70 home runs to break Roger Maris record of 61. During this extraordinary event in the baseball world, one item of skepticism clouded the entire accomplishment. During an interview that he was giving next to his locker, a reporter noticed a bottle on the top shelf. This bottle was filled with a nutritional pill titled androstenedione, a legal dietary supplement that is a testosterone-producing drug that helps the body repair itself after workouts. This repairment, in turn, helps the person t ...
    Related: documentary evidence, olympic committee, international olympic committee, apply, clinton
  • Archery - 868 words
    Archery The National Archery Association of the United States had its origin as a result of our own country's history. After the Civil War, Confederate soldiers were not allowed to own firearms. Two brothers, J. Maurice and William H. Thompson, learned to hunt with the bow and arrow and became accomplished archers. They were both founding members of the N.A.A. in 1879 at Crawfordsville, Indiana. Archery tournaments, as we know them today, can also be traced back to England. Competitions were held as part of community festivals as early as the 17th century. Archery became an official event in the modern Olympic Games in 1900 and was also featured in 1904, 1908 and 1920. International rules ha ...
    Related: archery, different ways, high tech, training program, bare
  • Article Summaries - 1,075 words
    Article Summaries Article 1- Excavating Egypt (Newsprint) This article tells of a typical working day for an archaeologist in Egypt. It tells of an experienced archaeologist named, Dr. David OConnor. He speaks of his working site, Abydos, and tells of what he has discovered since he started working on the site. In his 30 years of working there, he has uncovered 12 wooden boats, each about 60 feet long encased in 96-foot graves. He has also found the remains of an entire settlement covering about 16 acres. He annually spends up to $150,000 to pay of his fellow archaeologists and his laborers. He does receive funds from private institutions and government agencies to help support his effort in ...
    Related: assembly line, henry ford, ancient civilizations, uncovered, fixed
  • Athletes As Role Models - 1,023 words
    ... eion, but he never really liked that part of him so he changed his ways. Deion spent hours passing out food to the people in his community. Sanders is faithful to his community and he is also faithful to God. Deion is a dedicated Christian (Baker 1D). This shows how caring, giving, and unselfish he is as a person. Our society needs these types of role models for people to look up to. One issue that seems to come up quite often with the mention of athletes is Drugs. Of all the major athlete drug testing programs, only the NBA does not test for marijuana, because the NBA drug policy does not include marijuana in its list or banned drugs(Athletes With). This is probably the main reason they ...
    Related: professional athletes, role model, drug testing, peer pressure, incident
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