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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: old english

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  • 16th Century Poetry - 1,273 words
    16Th Century Poetry Part I: 1. Name three of the Germanic tribes that brought to England the dialects that make up the basis of the language we now call Old English. The Germanic tribes that brought the dialects were the Angles, the Saxons, and the Jutes. 2. Give an example from Beowulf of three of the following poetic devices: alliteration, the kenning, variation (repetition of appositives), or the litote (understatement). There are several examples of alliteration in lines 3079-3084, "Nothing we advised could ever convince the prince we loved, our land's guardian, not to vex the custodian of the gold, let him lie where he was long accustomed, lurk there under earth until the end of the wor ...
    Related: century poetry, poetry, wife of bath, queen guinevere, repetition
  • Alfred The Great - 1,744 words
    Alfred The Great King Alfred the Great King Alfred the Great was born at Wantage, in 849, on a royal manor of his father's holding, a family estate which long afterward he himself would leave in legacy to his wife. Alfred was the youngest of five children, four sons and a daughter, born to Ethelwulf by his wife Osburh. When Alfred was four years old, his father, the king, who by now had long despaired of getting to Rome in the present state of things, decided to send Alfred there, to at least receive the blessing of the Holy Father. The pope at the time, Leo the IV, gave Alfred the blessing to become king. Alfred's time came in the year mid-April 871, when King thelred died. Only a king of f ...
    Related: alfred, first great, present state, last year, preface
  • Beowulf - 784 words
    Beowulf The Sale of Christianity When reading Beowulf, one must carefully consider the time era with which it is associated with. Consider, if you will, a life that has been based upon numerous fictitious Gods and Goddesses. Your life was truly fated to be whatever the Gods wanted it to be, anything could be blamed on, fate. The afterlife could have been possibly the hardest bit to swallow. Only soldiers dying in battle could gain admission to their form of salvation, named Valhalla, which was only a place to sit and wait for the coming of the end of everything. You die to get somewhere, and then when you get there you just have to sit and wait until the infamous battle comes that will event ...
    Related: beowulf, christian elements, anglo saxon, english literature, demons
  • Beowulf - 776 words
    Beowulf Annonymous The epic poem Beowulf, written in Old English by Christian monks around 750 AD, is a wonderful adventure story about a warrior who kills ferocious monsters. The use of description and imagery enlivens the story, making it possible for a reader to really see in his or her mind the characters and events. Metaphors, exaggeration, and alliteration are three devices that together allow the reader to experience this poem which is quite different than most other poetry. A metaphor is a figure of speech in which a word or phrase that ordinarily means one thing is applied to another thing to suggest a likeness between the two. Metaphors are used extensively throughout the poem to p ...
    Related: beowulf, modern fiction, grendel's mother, hard facts, prince
  • Beowulf Analysis Of The Epic - 990 words
    Beowulf - Analysis of the Epic The Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf is the most important work of Old English literature, and is well deserved of the distinction. The epic tells the story of a hero, a Scandinavian prince named Beowulf, who rids the Danes of the monster Grendel, a descendent of Cain, and of his exploits fighting Grendels mother and a Dragon. Throughout the epic, the Anglo-Saxon story teller uses many elements to build a certain depth to the characters. Just a few of the important character elements in Beowulf are Wealth & Honor, Biblical & Paganistic, and Man vs. Wild themes. Many of the characters in Beowulf are, like in most epics, defined by their status. But, in addition to statu ...
    Related: beowulf, epic, grendel beowulf, modern times, english literature
  • Beowulf Is One Of The Oldest Existing Poems In The English Language Originally Written In Anglosaxon, It Has Been Translated - 728 words
    Beowulf is one of the oldest existing poems in the English language. Originally written in Anglo-Saxon, it has been translated to give readers the opportunity to enjoy this colorful, heroic poem of Englands epic age. It has been declared as a heroic-elegaic poem because of the various characteristics it clearly possesses. An epic consists of a hero who is larger than life. Beowulf is unquestionably a perfect example of this hero because of the amazing acts of heroism he commits. Epic characters also give numerous speeches that revel something about the past or the speakers characteristics. Beowulf does not give many, but from those he gives, the reader leans about his character traits. The l ...
    Related: beowulf, english language, old english, oldest, poems
  • Beowulf: Not Just A Kids Story - 1,651 words
    Beowulf: Not Just A KidS Story When you compare Beowulf to any modern novel or movie, Beowulf seems childlike at best. Beowulf is told in a straightforward, uncomplicated manner very unlike many of todays works, which contain complex plots and themes. What makes Beowulf readable to an adult and not just children? Why do people find stories such as Beowulf so intriguing? Why is Beowulf, or any myth, significant? Beowulf, the story of the young Beowulf sent by fate to save a kingdom plagued with a nightmarish monster, a rather basic plot synopsis especially for a story that has been around for more than one thousand years. However Beowulf contains far more long-standing impact than a slew of t ...
    Related: first battle, belief system, good and evil, decipher, desirable
  • Book Report: Around The World In 80 Days - 259 words
    book report: around the world in 80 days subject = english title = book report: around the world in 80 days The book I read was Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne. The main characters were Phileas Fogg, and Jean Passeportout. The setting was all around the world. The summary of the plot was simple. Mr. Phileas Fogg bet twenty thousand pounds that he could make it around the world in eighty days. Well, the whole story was about Mr. Fogg and his butler, Jean Passeportout, trying to get around the world in eighty days. They traveled around the world by every possible means, and to make things worse, the cops thought that Mr. Fogg took some bank notes from the Bank of England. Becaus ...
    Related: book report, bank of england, old english, jules verne, butler
  • Bradstreet Heritage - 1,032 words
    Bradstreet Heritage Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672), although born in England, is considered to be the first American poet. She is also revered as the first woman to be published. Married to Simon Bradstreet at age sixteen, she ventured with her family to the Massachusetts colony. Simon, the governor of Massachusetts colony, served a major role in her life and her literary career. He was the subject in many of the poems included in the two volumes Bradstreet had published. A Puritan all her life, Bradstreet led a simple life guided by principles of grace, plainness, and divine missions. In "To My Dear and Living Husband", she shows her devotion to her husband in a smooth and simple manner. We ca ...
    Related: anne bradstreet, bradstreet, heritage, loving husband, old english
  • Chivalry In Chaucers Canterbury Tales - 791 words
    Chivalry in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales In his Canterbury Tales, Chaucer fully explicates the cultural standard known as curteisye through satire. In the fourteenth century curteisye embodied sophistication and an education in French international culture. The legends of chilvalric knights, conversing in the language of courtly love, matured during this later medieval period. Chaucer himself matured in the King's Court, and he reveled in his cultural status, but he also retained an anecdotal humor about curteisye. One must only peruse his Tales to discern these sentiments. In the General Prologue, he meticulously describes the Prioress, satirically examining her impeccable table manners. In t ...
    Related: canterbury, canterbury tales, chivalry, the canterbury tales, courtly love
  • Christian Elements In Beowulf - 1,052 words
    ... n the mere, just as any rational soul would prefer death to eternal damnation. Beowulfs last monstrous foe is designated by the word wyrm meaning a serpent or worm, and the word draca meaning dragon. In the Old English poetry, the worm and dragon represent enmity to mankind. The worms who devour mans corpse after death, the dragons and serpents who receive his soul in hell, and the dragon of sin and mortality who rules over earth until Christ cancels for all time the work of the tempest. The Grendel kin and the dragon share some of the descriptive words and epithets used for monsters in the poem such as slayer, enemy, and evil destroyer. They all live in demonic halls. Some poets believe ...
    Related: beowulf, christian, christian elements, old english, medieval literature
  • Comitatus - 813 words
    Comitatus The concept of comitatus is important for understanding the actions and attitudes of a thane and his relationship to his lord. A band of thanes pledged themselves to a feudal lord who was known for his bravery and generosity. They swore to defend him to their death, and they considered it shameful to leave the battlefield if their chief was slain. According to their loyal code, if their leader was killed, his life must be avenged. He was their lord, and they were his loyal, proud retainers. They were known for their courage, bravery, recklessness, and foremost, for their loyalty. In return the lord provided them with protection and shared his weapons and wealth with them. The Battl ...
    Related: comitatus, american society, anglo saxon, english army, wiser
  • Comparison Of Beowulf And Street Gangs - 846 words
    Comparison Of Beowulf And Street Gangs We often think of the Old English time as an era filled with mighty pagan warriors gathered in a dark wooden room, drinking ale to celebrate their victory in a brutish bloody battle. Or maybe we picture brawny Vikings with dirty faces wearing animal skins while sailing in large wooden ships. You may even imagine the crude but lovable Hagar the Horrible from the popular comic strip. Regardless to which of these views you take, we always think of the Old English as a time far in the past. Even though we may not notice, the strong brutal men of this past era infiltrate our everyday lives. These barbaric warriors are found in our society as street gangs. Al ...
    Related: beowulf, comparison, gang violence, high school, old english
  • Death In The Dream Of The Rood - 1,506 words
    Death In The Dream Of The Rood The crucifixion of Christ is treated differently within the bodies of Old English and Middle English literature. The values of each era's society are superimposed on the descriptions of the sacrifice of Christ on the cross. Christ is depicted either as the model of the hero, prevalent in Old English literature, or as the embodiment of love and passion, as found in Showings by Julian of Norwich. Old English literature establishes the elements of the heroic code, to which its society ascribed. A man must live, or die, by his honor. In The Dream of the Rood the crucifixion of Christ is depicted as the ultimate symbol of heroism, as all mankind bewailed Christ's de ...
    Related: dream, rood, norton anthology, english literature, beowulf
  • Domestic Violence: Theory, Effects Interventions - 2,884 words
    Domestic Violence: Theory, Effects & Interventions The female is, as it were, a mutilated ... a sort of natural deficiency. It is not appropriate in a female character to be manly or clever. The male is by nature superior and the female inferior. Introduction Domestic violence has been present in our society and an accepted practice of many cultures for hundreds of years. Up until the late 1800's, a man in this country had the right to chastise his wife until the practice was declared illegal in two states (Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence Manual, p. B-8). Old English Common Law allowed husbands to beat their wives provided that the stick they used was not thicker than his th ...
    Related: domestic abuse, domestic violence, intervention strategies, battered women, loving husband
  • England Latin Anglia, Political Division Of The Island Of Great Britain, Constituting, With Wales, The Principal Division Of - 4,616 words
    England (Latin Anglia), political division of the island of Great Britain, constituting, with Wales, the principal division of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. England occupies all of the island east of Wales and south of Scotland, another division of the United Kingdom. Established as an independent monarchy many centuries ago, England in time achieved political control over the rest of the island, all the British Isles, and vast sections of the world, becoming the nucleus of one of the greatest empires in history. The capital, largest city, and chief port of England is London, with a population (1991 preliminary) of 6,378,600. It is also the capital of Great Britai ...
    Related: church of england, division, great britain, latin, principal, southern england
  • English Literature In 16th - 971 words
    English Literature In 16th Although the literature of England during the Middle Ages may hardly seem comparable to the more elegant literature present during the Renaissance, England=s early literature actually paved the way for the poems and plays of the 16th century. In this respect, English literature of the Renaissance may be seen as a refinement of its earlier works, helped in part by the collapse of the universal church and the rebirth of Greek and Roman ideas. Many of the things written about during this period-- the issues addressed in The Canterbury Tales for example-- were not entirely new subjects, but instead ones that been suppressed by the church or upper-class in previous work ...
    Related: english literature, literature, old english, century women, roman catholic
  • Family Abuse - 1,802 words
    Family Abuse ALTHOUGH DOMESTIC VIOLENCE INCLUDES SIBLING ABUSE AND ELDER ABUSE, AND CHILD ABUSE THE FOCUS OF MY ESSAY IS ON SPOUSE ABUSE. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HAS MANY NAMES; FAMILY VIOLENCE, BATTERING, WIFE BEATING, AND DOMESTIC ABUSE. ALL THESE TERMS REFER TO THE SAME THING, ABUSE BY A MARITAL, COMMON LAW, OR A DATING PARTNER IN AN INTIMATE RELATIONSHIP. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IS NOT LIMITED TO PHYSICAL BEATINGS. IT IS ANY BEHAVIOUR THAT IS INTENDED TO SUBJUGATE AND CONTROL ANOTHER HUMAN BEING THROUGH THE USE OF HUMILIATION, FEAR, AND PHYSICAL OR VERBAL ASSAULTS. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IS VERY IMPORTANT ISSUE IN TODAY'S SOCIETY BECAUSE IT HAS SUCH A PROFOUND NEGATIVE AFFECT ON THE ABUSED, MENTALLY AND ...
    Related: abuse, child abuse, domestic abuse, emotional abuse, family violence, sexual abuse
  • Gangs - 1,599 words
    GANGS OVERVIEW OF GANGS Originally the word gang had no negative connotation. In Old English, gang simply referred to a "number of people who went around together-a group." Today a gang can be defined in four basic ways: an organized group with a leader a unified group that usually remains together during peaceful times as well as times of conflict a group whose members show unity through clothing, language a group whose activities are criminal or threatening to the larger society. Gangs are one of the results of poverty, discrimination and urban deterioration. Some experts believe that young people, undereducated and without access to good jobs, become frustrated with their lives and jo ...
    Related: gang violence, street gang, civil rights movement, civil rights, ghetto
  • Gangs - 1,599 words
    GANGS OVERVIEW OF GANGS Originally the word gang had no negative connotation. In Old English, gang simply referred to a "number of people who went around together-a group." Today a gang can be defined in four basic ways: an organized group with a leader a unified group that usually remains together during peaceful times as well as times of conflict a group whose members show unity through clothing, language a group whose activities are criminal or threatening to the larger society. Gangs are one of the results of poverty, discrimination and urban deterioration. Some experts believe that young people, undereducated and without access to good jobs, become frustrated with their lives and jo ...
    Related: gang violence, street gang, abuse neglect, old english, kentucky
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