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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: obligation

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  • Catholic Obligation To The Poor - 434 words
    Catholic Obligation To The Poor Christians have an obligation to care for the poor because it is what should come through as their works from their beliefs and their faith. Christians are to follow the examples set by God and Jesus. The Lord and Jesus' teachings of helping the poor can be seen through the scripture in the Gospels. In the gospels Jesus brings salvation to the poor exemplifying his theme of universalism. Jesus gave the message of helping those whom ask of one's help to his disciples in order for them to teach to Christian. This message can be seen through this excerpt from the Gospel, "Give to everyone who begs from you; and if anyone takes away your goods, do not ask for them ...
    Related: catholic, obligation, good news, intention, quotation
  • 1994 Baseball Strike - 1,617 words
    1994 Baseball Strike On August 12, 1994 professional baseball players went on strike for the eighth time in the sports history. Since 1972, negotiations between the union and owners over contract terms has led to major economic problems and the absence of a World Series in 1994. All issues were open for debate due to the expiration of the last contract. Until 1968, no collective bargaining agreement had ever been reached between the owners and the players (Dolan 11). Collective bargaining is the process by which union representatives for employees in a bargaining unit negotiate employment conditions for the entire bargaining unit (Atlantic Unbound). Instead, the players were at the mercy of ...
    Related: baseball, baseball players, league baseball, major league baseball, strike
  • A Rose For Emily - 1,941 words
    A Rose For Emily The Factors that Form the Character Emily Grierson The characters in a work of literature are not only formed by their characteristics, but also by the story. There are many factors in a story which shape the characters. These may include the setting, mood, and theme. In William Faulkners A Rose for Emily, the conflict between past and present, chronological order and generations, her physical appearance and the grotesque mood affect the way the reader views Emily Grierson. In the small town of Jefferson, somewhere in the south, lived a woman named Miss Emily. After her father died, the Colonel pardoned her taxes. This caused conflict as she got older since there was no writ ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, emily grierson, rose for emily, an encounter
  • A Rose For Emily - 531 words
    A Rose For Emily Letting Go Many people hate to let things go. People find security and comfort in their possessions and the company they keep. If all this is ripped away from a person, it can have a very negative effect on that persons life. In Faulkners short story, A Rose for Emily, everything that a person knows is gradually taken away from her gradually leading to her madness. Miss Emily, the main character in this short story, is an example of a time that once was. Miss Emily had been a tradition, a duty, and a care; a sort of hereditary obligation upon the town(362). Not only is her appearance a symbol of the past but the place that she called home is also very old fashioned. Miss Emi ...
    Related: a rose for emily, emily, rose for emily, homer barron, short story
  • A Rose, The Universal Symbol Of Love - 637 words
    A Rose, the Universal Symbol of Love In William Faulkner's A Rose for Emily, Miss Emily Grierson is a lonely old woman, living a life void of all love and affection; although the rose only directly appears in the title, the rose surfaces throughout the story as a symbol. In contemporary times, the rose also symbolizes emotions like love and friendship. The rose symbolizes dreams of romances and lovers. These dreams belong to women, who like Emily Grierson, have yet to experience true love for themselves. Throughout the life of Emily Grierson, she remains locked up, never experiencing love from anyone but her father. She lives a life of loneliness, left only to dream of the love missing from ...
    Related: true love, rose for emily, william faulkner, contemporary times, teaches
  • A Separate Peace: Chapter 1 - 5,644 words
    ^^^^^^^^^^A SEPARATE PEACE: CHAPTER 1 Have you ever in your life gone through an experience so intense, so joyful, so painful, or just so important at the time, that you could only understand much later what truly happened? Isn't it a fact that when we're in the middle of an experience, we are often unable to think clearly about it because we're too busy feeling the moment's thrill or sadness to stop and come to sensible conclusions? Our high school years are just such a time: of quick growth and self-discovery, of forging as well as breaking friendships, of proving ourselves to others, in the classroom and on the sports field, and a time when we want very much to be individuals and to stick ...
    Related: separate peace, competitive edge, power over, john knowles, legs
  • A Sick Man's Precious Life - 1,043 words
    A Sick Man'S Precious Life Technology has been a part of everyone's life. It can be found everywhere, in homes, in education and even in the field of medicine. Technology lead to the further development of healing and curing. Because of it, doctors can cure patients more easily and effectively. However, technology is not always an advantage. It has brought several unacceptable ideas, one of which is the ending of a suffering patient's life. This is more popularly known as euthanasia. Euthanasia, from its Greek origin meaning easy death or dying well, is an action or omission which of itself or by intention caused death in order that all suffering may be eliminated. Euthanasia is more than ki ...
    Related: human life, precious, quality of life, holy book, nazi germany
  • A Sufis Connection To The World - 647 words
    A Sufi's Connection To The World A Sufis Connection to the World 11/18/99 The attributes of the followers of the Sufi tradition are attributes that serve to loosen their connection to the world while bringing them closer to God. The attributes they have distinguish them from ordinary people. According to Teachings of the Sufis, by Carl Ernst, they are strict followers of a master, strive to be humble, and try to live without worldly possessions and desires. At the core of the practice of Sufism is reliance on the truth of God. It is very important that this reliance is maintained, otherwise the follower will become distracted by worldly things and ideas. The Sufi master Abu Ali al-Daqqaq sai ...
    Related: ordinary people, satan, reliance, tree
  • Abe And Isaac - 777 words
    Abe And Isaac Having never even stepped on church grounds, besides for a wedding, this is the first time I have heard of the story of Abraham and Isaac, let alone having read it. After reading the passage I must confess that I was quite surprised and confused. My initial reaction was that of many questions. Why does Abraham obey God? What kind of sick test is this? Why should anyone be this scared of God that they would be driven to kill their only son? What would the consequence have been had Abraham said no? With these questions bearing on my mind I moved on to Adams' "Abraham's Dilemma." Adams' chapter on this situation provided insight on some of my questions while also enlightening me w ...
    Related: isaac, divine command, command theory, offering, consequence
  • Abortion - 1,138 words
    Abortion Abortion has been one of the topics of hot debate for the last three decades in our nation. Since the Roe v/s Wade decision in 1973, some Americans feel the need to ponder whether aborting fetuses is a moral action. On the one hand, some people feel that abortion should be legal because a woman has a right to choose whether she wants to continue a pregnancy or not. It's her body. On the other hand, some feel that fetuses have no advocates and deserve a right to live, so it is immoral to abandon their rights and kill them. This issue is not only at the center of political debate, but philosophical debate as well. In this paper, I will examine and critique Mary Anne Warren's On the Mo ...
    Related: abortion, hierarchy of needs, moral status, right to life, personhood
  • Abortion In Utilitarian Terms - 1,387 words
    Abortion In Utilitarian Terms Abortion This essay is an analysis of abortion in utilitarian terms. Compared to some writings on abortion, it is very short. And it is short for good reason: utilitarianism really has very little to say on this issue. Intuitionists will predictably take this as proof of the inadequacy of utilitarianism. The utilitarian, however, after noticing the various muddles produced by the intuitionist - the arguments over whether the fetus is a person, whether one person has the right to the use of another's body and/or whether someone has the right to determine what occurs in their own body (and in the case of both, the interminable debates as to what is to be done abou ...
    Related: abortion, utilitarian, animal abuse, high cost, poorer
  • Abortion Paper - 1,933 words
    Abortion Paper The coexistence of opposite and conflicting feelings about abortion is centuries old. Disagreements between public policy, morality and individual behavior on this issue existed even at the time of Plato and Aristotle. In the past few decades abortion issue has been brought into sharper focus and has been vigorously debated. A number of factors are responsible for this but perhaps the major one has been that associated with the sexual revolution which accentuates freedom in all matters sexual and in spite of or even because of the tremendous and indiscriminate increase in the distribution of contraceptives. Judges have ruled, politicians have legislated, but the controversy on ...
    Related: abortion, death sentence, welfare programs, the bible, metal
  • Abortion Prolife View - 1,104 words
    ... oved by God who has a distinct plan for their lives. It denies the child the right to live and society the privilege of the childs gift and contributions to the world. "God hears the new life in the womb, the heart within the heart, the anguish cry of hostage child sobbing in the dark." Many times after having an abortion, a woman will become emotionally unstable. Post-abortion syndrome describes the trauma of the woman who finally feels guilty, understands the repercussions of her actions, and regrets her previous decision. Statistics show that 92% feel less in touch with their emotions or feel a need to suppress their emotions. 82% had greater feelings of loneliness or isolation and 86 ...
    Related: abortion, human nature, moral responsibility, senate judiciary committee, rage
  • Abortion Prolife View - 1,093 words
    ... the right to live and society the privilege of the childs gift and contributions to the world. God hears the new life in the womb, the heart within the heart, the anguish cry of hostage child sobbing in the dark. Many times after having an abortion, a woman will become emotionally unstable. Post-abortion syndrome describes the trauma of the woman who finally feels guilty, understands the repercussions of her actions, and regrets her previous decision. Statistics show that 92% feel less in touch with their emotions or feel a need to suppress their emotions. 82% had greater feelings of loneliness or isolation and 86% had increased tendency toward anger or rage. 53% increased or began use ...
    Related: abortion, online available, united states senate, pro-life movement, minute
  • Absolute Poverty - 1,934 words
    Absolute Poverty Peter Singers characterization of absolute poverty is defined by using the criteria given by World Bank President, Robert McNamara. McNamara states that absolute poverty is, a condition of life so characterized by malnutrition, illiteracy, disease, squalid surroundings, high infant mortality and low life expectancy as to beneath any reasonable definition of human decency. This form of poverty affects human life on all levels of existence. A comparison is given between the relative poverty of industrialized nations versus the absolute poverty of developing nations. Relative poverty means that some citizens are poor, relative to the wealth enjoyed by their neighbors. Absolute ...
    Related: absolute, absolute poverty, poverty, relative poverty, save lives
  • Abstract Of Bill Joys The Dark Side Of Technology - 308 words
    Abstract Of Bill Joy's The Dark Side Of Technology In his speech, The Dark Side of Technology, Bill Joy addresses the pros and cons of three new technologies: genetic engineering, nanotechnology, and robotics. Though optimistic about the benefits of these quickly developing and promising technologies, referred to as GNR for short, Joy expresses his concerns about them. Joy is primarily concerned with the self-replicating abilities they potentially possess and the widespread availability of them to those who may misuse them. Joy discusses the fact that unlike threats in previous generations such as nuclear devastation, threats created by GNR will be even more harmful and prevalent due mostly ...
    Related: abstract, dark side, technology, sun microsystems, genetic engineering
  • Accounting 2 - 949 words
    Accounting 2 PRINCIPLES of ACCOUNTING II (AC202) CHAPTER 12 CURRENT AND LONG-TERM LIABILITIES LIABILITIES DEFINED: A probable future payment of assets or services a company is presently obligated to make as a result of past transactions or events. Fundamentally liabilities are measured by the cost principle however: Liabilities are comprised of known obligations of a definite amount and known obligations of an estimated amount (i.e. warranties) CURRENT LIABILITIES: Obligations expected to be paid using current assets or by creating other current liabilities LONG-TERM LIABILITIES: Obligations not expected to be paid within one year. Includes long-term notes payable; mortgages payable; warra ...
    Related: accounting, working capital, time value, notes payable, principal
  • Adventures Of Huck Finn - 1,238 words
    Adventures Of Huck Finn Ever since it was written, Mark Twains Huckleberry Finn has been a novel that many people have found disturbing. Although some argue that the novel is extremely racist, careful reading will prove just the opposite. In recent years especially, there has been an increasing debate over what some will call the racist ideas in the novel. In some cases the novel has even been banned by public school systems and censored by public libraries. The basis for the debate is how Jim, a black slave and one of the main characters, is depicted. However, if one was to look at the underlying themes in the novel, they would realize that it is not racist and could even be considered an a ...
    Related: finn, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn, public school
  • Advertising And Media - 1,437 words
    Advertising And Media The evolution of the mass media is very interesting subject of study that presents variations according to different circumstances. One of these is the place where this evolution takes place. Because media as institutions are part of society, are influenced from any particular characteristic that each society has. In the case of Greece, it's really interesting to see how the evolution of a medium like radio, has been affected by the particular characteristics of Greek society and more specifically by Greek politics. The particularity of the Greek case, as Papathanassopoulos points up, is that the Greek state is hyper centralized because of the dictatorial periods that G ...
    Related: advertising, broadcast media, mass media, media, radio station
  • Affirmative Action - 1,025 words
    Affirmative Action The idea that different subcategories of humans exist, and that depending on one's point of view, some subcategories are inherently inferior to others, has been around since ancient times. This concept eventually gained the label of "race" in 1789, a "zoological term... generally defined as a subcategory of a species which inherits certain physical characteristics that distinguish it from other categories of that same species." (Tivnan 181). Although slavery has been by and large eliminated in virtually every part of the modern world, the concept used to rationalize its implementation, "racism", still plagues most modern cultures. Races that were once enslaved, or are mino ...
    Related: affirmative, affirmative action, education system, equal rights, inherently
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