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Free research papers and essays on topics related to: novels

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  • A Closed Family In Anne Tylers Dinner At The Homesick Restaraunt - 853 words
    A Closed Family In Anne Tyler's Dinner At The Homesick Restaraunt A Closed Family: Growth Through Suffering The novel Dinner at the Homesick Restaurant is one of Tyler's more complex because it involves not only the growth of the mother, Pearl Tull, but each of her children as well. Pearl must except her faults in raising her children, and her children must all face their own loneliness, jealousy, or imperfection. It is in doing this that they find connections to their family. They find growth through suffering. "Cody Tull, the oldest child and the one most damaged by the failure of his parents' marriage he becomes an aggressive, quarrelsome efficiency expert."(Voelker 126) He feels that it ...
    Related: anne, anne tyler, dinner, family business, family life, homesick
  • A Comparison Of Biographic Features In The Sun Also Rises And The Great Gatsby - 1,226 words
    A Comparison Of Biographic Features In The Sun Also Rises And The Great Gatsby Trevor Bender Mrs. Watkins AP Lit. and Comp April 12th, 2001 The writers F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway included biographical information in their novels The Great Gatsby and The Sun Also Rises that illuminated the meaning of the work. Although The Sun Also Rises is more closely related to actual events in Hemingway's life than The Great Gatsby was to events in Fitzgerald's life, they both take the same approach. They both make use of non-judgemental narrators to comment on the lost generation. This narrator allows Fitzgerlald and Hemingway to write about their own society. Fitzgerlald comments on the ja ...
    Related: comparison, gatsby, great gatsby, jay gatsby, sun also rises, the great gatsby
  • A Comparison Of Biographic Features In The Sun Also Rises And The Great Gatsby - 1,268 words
    ... doesn't.1) Gatsby is gullible for beliving Daisy when she tells him she loved him, when it is clear to both the reader and nick that her only concern is money and wealth. When she tells him that she loved Tom too, the words seemed to bite physically into Gatsby.2) This shows the romantic idealized views of Gatsby. Hemingway and The Sun Also Rises Like Fitzgerald's, The Great Gatsby, The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway contains autobiographical features that illuminate the work and add to the meaning of the novel. However, the plot behind The Sun Also Rises is more exactly based on actual events in Hemingway's life than The Great Gatsby was to Fitzgerald's life. Indeed, the entire plot ...
    Related: comparison, gatsby, great gatsby, sun also rises, the great gatsby
  • A Date With Kosinski - 1,590 words
    A Date With Kosinski A Date with Kosinski Being James Bond is every man's dream. The beautiful women, fancy cars, dangerous journeys, and beautiful women. Many men would love to be in his place where all the danger and excitement take place. We don't have that capability to become an international spy, but in the novel, Blind Date by Jerzy Kosinski, we are exposed to a life similar to that of James Bond. He goes through secret negotiations. Jerzy Kosinski's use of words greatly contributes to the novel's excellence. He forces the reader to imagine everything that happens in the novel using very descriptive words and phrases. The main character of the novel is George Levanter. He poses as an ...
    Related: young adult, nazi germany, world war ii, woman, philosophy
  • A Farewell To Arms - 534 words
    A Farewell To Arms A Farewell to Arms The novel A Farewell to Arms should be classified as a historical romance. Many people in reading this book could interpret this to be a war novel, when in fact it was one of the great romance novels written in its time. When reading this book you notice how every important event of the war is overshadowed by the strong love story behind it. The love story is circled around two people, Frederic Henry and Catherine Barkley. Frederic is a young American ambulance driver with the Italian army in World War I. He meets Catherine, a beautiful English nurse, near the front of Italy and Austria. At first Frederics relationship with Catherine consists of a game b ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, farewell, farewell to arms, frederic henry, world war i
  • A Farewell To Arms - 438 words
    A Farewell To Arms A Farewell to Arms The book A Farewell to Arms, written by Ernest Hemingway is about the love story of a nurse and a war ridden soldier. The story starts as Frederick Henry is serving in the Italian Army. He meets his future love in the hospital that he gets put in for various reasons. I thought that A Farewell to Arms was a good book because of the symbolism, the plot, and the constant moving of the main character. The symbolism in A Farewell to Arms is very much apparent. To the main character in novels, nights have always been a sign of death, or something negative to happen. Another one of the symbolisms in A Farewell to Arms is when Henry tries to escape from the Ital ...
    Related: a farewell to arms, farewell, farewell to arms, frederick henry, ernest hemingway
  • A Nobel Writing Style Reviewed - 997 words
    A Nobel Writing Style Reviewed Earnest Hemmingway is an accomplished author with a large audience. While short novels like The Old Man and the Sea have intrigued many, his war stories have won him a Nobel Prize. Hemmingway possesses a writing style all his own, his ability to write descriptively is unparalleled. His use of similar themes, symbolism, irony, and similar main characters is very profound. Hemmingways use of theme makes his writing style significant. In The Old Man and the Sea Santiago went through a lot of trouble to catch his magnificent fish and didnt want to loose it. The author writes, He did not want to look at the fish. He knew that half of him had been destroyed. This quo ...
    Related: nobel, nobel prize, writing style, open door, good night
  • A Tale Of Two Cities - 1,181 words
    A Tale Of Two Cities Resurrection in A Tale of Two Cities Resurrection is a powerful theme found throughout the plot of A Tale of Two Cities. Many of the characters in the novel are involved with the intertwining themes of love, redemption, and good versus evil. The theme of resurrection involves certain aspects of all of these themes and brings the story together. Dr. Manette is the first person to experience resurrection in A Tale of Two Cities. He is taken away from his pregnant wife and then imprisoned for eighteen very long years. Over the years, his condition deteriorates until he forgets his real name and mindlessly cobbles shoes to pass the time. In Book the First, he is released by ...
    Related: tale, tale of two cities, jerry cruncher, specific purpose, endanger
  • Abigail Adams Was A Unique Woman Because She Had An Education And An Interest In Politics She Learned How To Read And Write A - 756 words
    Abigail Adams was a unique woman because she had an education and an interest in politics. She learned how to read and write and enjoyed poems most. She was also very resourceful by helping her husband on difficult problems. Abigail was born on November 11 on the Julian calendar, or November 22 on the modern Gregorian calendar. Abigail had two sisters named Mary and Elizabeth or Betsy. She had one brother named William or Billy. Abigail's name was originally Abigail Smith. Each baby was baptized on the first Sabbath of its life and was recorded in their parish records. Abigail live in a comfortable house. When Abigail was sixteen, her father added a wing that was bigger than the original bui ...
    Related: abigail, abigail adams, john adams, woman, public affairs
  • Absurd - 1,347 words
    Absurd Theatre Influences on Theatre of the Absurd Big feet, stampeding rhinoceroses, and barren sets are typical of the theatre of the absurd. The dramatic content, symbolism, and spectacles are an amazing thing to see and an impossibility to comprehend. The philosophy of the absurd and the dawn of mankind influenced these plays in the twentieth century. The main proponents and works of the theater of the absurd and philosophy were influenced by the chaotic actions of the early and mid-twentieth century. These chaotic actions led them to search for something in literature and drama never seen before. A brief survey of the main proponents and works of the absurd philosophy and theater can le ...
    Related: absurd, human life, north africa, political power, cycle
  • Adventures - 1,781 words
    Adventures Of Huck Finn Critics Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Twain told the truth in great novels and memoirs and short stories and essays, and he became a writer of international renown still translated into 72 languages. He became, through the written and spoken word, America's greatest ambassador and its most perpetually quoted. Samuel L. Clemens was born in 1835 in a town called Florida, Mo., and before he became a famous writer under the pen name Mark Twain, he worked on a riverboat, as a prospector for gold, as a reporter, and at other enterprises( Twain 12). He was not a young man of excellent reputation - a conclusion reached by Jervis Langdon, an Elmira businessman who had been as ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, the adventures of huckleberry finn, runaway slaves, samuel langhorne clemens, conformity
  • Adventures - 1,850 words
    ... oint. They gave Huck 40 dollars in gold, but put it on a piece of wood so that they would not have to expose themselves to the disease. The feud between the Granger fords and the Shaped sons is a venue for many of the themes in Huck Finn( Compton`s Encyclopedia).While everyone around her thought she was very gifted, her poems are amateurish and overly depressing. This is Twain's belief about the romantics in general. Twain ridicules the honor system that binds the two families to slaughter each other for an act that no one can remember. He points to their hypocrisy in commenting favorably on a sermon of brotherly love, with their guns in hand. This feud adds to Huck's distaste for societ ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, the adventures of huckleberry finn, luther king, southern society, mistaken
  • Adventures Of Huck Finn - 1,238 words
    Adventures Of Huck Finn Ever since it was written, Mark Twains Huckleberry Finn has been a novel that many people have found disturbing. Although some argue that the novel is extremely racist, careful reading will prove just the opposite. In recent years especially, there has been an increasing debate over what some will call the racist ideas in the novel. In some cases the novel has even been banned by public school systems and censored by public libraries. The basis for the debate is how Jim, a black slave and one of the main characters, is depicted. However, if one was to look at the underlying themes in the novel, they would realize that it is not racist and could even be considered an a ...
    Related: finn, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn, public school
  • Adventures Of Huck Finn - 1,343 words
    Adventures Of Huck Finn The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was written by Mark Twain. Mark Twain, born Samuel Langhorne Clemens in 1835, led one of the most exciting and adventuresome of literary lives. Raised in the river town of Hannibal, Missouri, Twain had to leave school at age twelve to seek work. He was successively a journeyman printer, a steamboat pilot, a halfhearted Confederate soldier (no more than a few weeks), and a prospector, miner and reporter in the western territories. His experiences furnished him with a wide knowledge of humanity, as well as with the perfect grasp of local customs and speech, which exhibits itself so well in his writing. With the publication in 1865 of T ...
    Related: adventures of huckleberry finn, finn, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn, the adventures of huckleberry finn
  • Adventures Of Huck Finn And Morality - 664 words
    Adventures Of Huck Finn And Morality In every persons life at one point they will have to make a choice based on their moral beliefs. These decisions can show what a person believes in right from the start. In Mark Twains The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn the main character Huck, makes two very important moral decisions. The first being how he treats Jim when he first meets him at Jacksons Island and the second is to tear up the letter to Miss Watson out of his love for Jim. When Huck first runs away from Pap he goes to Jacksons Island and thinks that he is the only person there. He soon finds out that this is not true, and that "Miss Watsons Jim"(41) is taking refuge there as well. Many pe ...
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  • Adventures Of Huck Finn And Racism - 443 words
    Adventures Of Huck Finn And Racism There is a current debate that the description of Jim in the novel "Huckleberry Finn" is racist leading to some schools banning it from their libraries. Jims character is described as an uneducated and simple sounding; illiterate slave and some people have looked upon this characterization as racist. Jim is depicted as a slave in the south during a period when slavery was common place and widely accepted as the way of life. Slaves of this time period were not provided any formal education; never allowed any independent thought and were constantly mistreated and abused. The author in my opinion is merely describing how a slave spoke in those days and was try ...
    Related: finn, huck, huck finn, huckleberry finn, racism
  • Agatha Christie: Queen Of The Mystery Genre - 1,400 words
    Agatha Christie: Queen Of The Mystery Genre Agatha Christie: Queen of the Mystery Genre Agatha Mary Clarissa Miller was born to Mr. and Mrs. Fred Miller of Torquay, Devon, England. Researchers debate on the year in which she was born, but it was September 15 in either 1890 or 1891. Her father was an American who lived with his British wife in Torquay. At the time, her parents did not realize that their daughter would one day become a famous English author, writing an insatiable amount of novels and plays. Her focus was mainly on the mystery genre of literature. She was married two times, and bore one daughter by her first husband. In 1971, five years before her death, Christie was given the ...
    Related: agatha, agatha christie, genre, murder mystery, mystery, queen
  • Airframe - 1,100 words
    Airframe Airframe, a novel by Michael Crichton was a fairly good book that became very exciting towards the end. It is about the aviation industry and a fictional company named Norton Aircraft that manufactures planes. There is only one main character and the plot of the novel is about a secret plan to destroy the president of Norton. The book gets off to a slow start, but rapidly builds up pace in the last hundred pages. The main character of the novel is Casey Singleton. She is a divorced mother in her mid-forties. She is a vice president of the Quality Assurance Incident Review Team. Whenever anything goes wrong with a plane that was made by Norton, the Incident Review Team finds out what ...
    Related: airframe, goes wrong, lost world, main character, reporter
  • Aldous Huxley - 898 words
    Aldous Huxley Aldous Huxley Many talented twentieth century writers have been overshadowed by classical writers such as Charles Dickens and William Shakespeare. Novels dealing with classical topics are often more recognized than works that tackle controversial topics. Aldous Huxley defies this stereotype, for his controversial works gained great fame while influencing many people. Huxley was not just a successful writer; he was a complex person whose ideas and novels influenced many people. Aldous Huxley was born July 26, 1894 (Its Online-Aldous Huxley) in Godalming, Surrey, England (Aldous (Leonard) Huxley). Huxley was born into a prominent family. His grandfather, Thomas Henry Huxley, was ...
    Related: aldous, aldous huxley, huxley, brave new world, matthew arnold
  • Alexander Dumas - 309 words
    Alexander Dumas Alexander Dumas was a major playwright who helped to revolutionize French drama and theater. He was one of the best historical novelists, publishing more than two hundred novels. He was born on July twenty fourth, mille eighteen in the french town of Villers-Cotterets. His father was a general in Napoleon's army. His mother, Marie-Louise-Elizabeth was an innkeeper. His father died when he was four years old and his mother was not able to provide him with much education. As a young man, Alexandre Dumas worked as a clerc and moved to Paris. After seeing one of Shakesphere's plays, Hamlet, he had found the direction that he needed to go. The play had inspired him to become a pla ...
    Related: alexander, alexandre dumas, dumas, henry iii, three musketeers
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